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#1
I was wondering about whether ice floats in boiling water today.


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#2
Yeah but it melts away as it floats really fast...
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#7
most ice cubes have air inside them. so they should float. some might not, but the air bubbles that come up from the bottom will push up the ice, so either way it'd float.
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#8
Density doesn't change with the heat of the object or liquid in question.

Just the excitement of the atoms.
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#9
No. It melts.
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#12
why dont you go boil water and put an ice cube in it???
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#13
BEDEVERE:
What also floats in water?
VILLAGER #1:
Bread!
VILLAGER #2:
Apples!
VILLAGER #3:
Uh, very small rocks!
VILLAGER #1:
Cider!
VILLAGER #2:
Uh, gra-- gravy!
UG'er #1 (a.k.a. TS, a.k.a. geetarguy13):
Ice!

VILLAGER #1:
Cherries!
VILLAGER #2:
Mud!
VILLAGER #3:
Uh, churches! Churches!
VILLAGER #2:
Lead! Lead!
ARTHUR:
A duck!
CROWD:
Oooh.
BEDEVERE:
Exactly. So, logically...
VILLAGER #1:
If... she... weighs... the same as a duck,... she's made of wood.
BEDEVERE:
And therefore?
VILLAGER #2:
A witch!
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Last edited by DougC84 at Nov 4, 2007,
#14
ok im a good ug'er. im doing it right now i will get back to you soon
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#15
Quote by imnotastoner
why dont you go boil water and put an ice cube in it???

+1
don't be so lazy

EDIT: nvm
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#16
Quote by thejester
ok im a good ug'er. im doing it right now i will get back to you soon

cool. how much water are you using to boil?
#17
Quote by isuckhardcore
Density doesn't change with the heat of the object or liquid in question.

Just the excitement of the atoms.



yes it does because when the atoms are excited they move all crazily leaving more space between them thus making them less dense as opossed to colder temps which calms the atoms making them move together more making it more dense.

c'mon 7th sci FTW
#18
Quote by geetarguy13
cool. how much water are you using to boil?


enough so if the ice cube does sink it will be fully submerged
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#19
Quote by isuckhardcore
Density doesn't change with the heat of the object or liquid in question.

Just the excitement of the atoms.


Yes it is... that's why things expand... they are less dense-- same atom numbers, greater space to fill = less density.
i*[∂/∂t]*Ψt = -[∇^2]/2*(Ψt) (unitless form)


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#20
It Floats
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#21
Quote by The4thHorsemen
who says hot water is less dense than ice?

Can you walk through ice?
Can you move when you're in a hot tub?
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#22
Quote by Dimebag22
Can you walk through ice?
Can you move when you're in a hot tub?

what?

I don't think being a solid/liquid has as much to do with the densities as temperature when it comes to water.
#23
Quote by Dimebag22
Can you walk through ice?
Can you move when you're in a hot tub?


that's not neccessarily density. Ice is less dense then water hence why it floats on water.
#24
I like how you said

"today"

Like things have really changed since the world started.

No I'm pretty sure boiling water hasn't...

It's not like water adapted this secret ice eating gene....
#25
Quote by thejester
It Floats

well I guess that pretty much puts an end to this discussion...

it still doesn't seem right, though, maybe i'll go try it.
#26
Quote by Draken
that's not neccessarily density. Ice is less dense then water hence why it floats on water.

Hmm... Seems that I hadn't thought all this throughly.
Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day
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#27
Quote by geetarguy13
what?

I don't think being a solid/liquid has as much to do with the densities as temperature when it comes to water.


Density it the amount of matter inside an object, which can be made into a formula lik so: D= M/V

In conclusion, ice is more dense than water, no matter the temperature of the water.

7th/8th grade science FTW
#28
^Mass is the amount of matter inside an object.

Density is the amount of matter divided by the volume.

The question is whether the unique crystal lattice of the ice decreases its density as much as heating water to boiling.
#29
water is the only known substance that becomes less dense when it gets cooler, this is because of the hydrogen bonding. That means that water gets less dense as it gets warmer and cooler - its at its densest at something near room temp,just thought I'd give a chemistry lesson.

yes it floats
#30
Quote by Dimebag22
Hmm... Seems that I hadn't thought all this throughly.

just remember if it floats it's less dense then the fluid below it. Hence also why oil floats on water.
#31
Quote by isuckhardcore
Density doesn't change with the heat of the object or liquid in question.

Just the excitement of the atoms.

I know everyone else has pointed it out, but dear god kid...semi intelligent sounding sentences don't do anything for you.
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#32
^(zombie monster) no, it isn't. Ice floats in water. therefore it's less dense.

Most substances are more dense as a solid than as a liquid. Water, on the other hand, forms a crystalline solid such that solid water (ice, yes, it's a crystal) is less dense than liquid water. That's why ice floats in water. This is true for any liquid water.
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#33
Quote by Draken
just remember if it floats it's less dense then the fluid below it. Hence also why oil floats on water.

Yeah, thanks.

Also, a couple minutes research got me this.

Density of water:

1000 kg·m−3, liquid (4 °C)
917 kg·m−3, solid

But what would happen if you upped the temp?
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#34
Quote by zombie_monster
Density it the amount of matter inside an object, which can be made into a formula lik so: D= M/V

In conclusion, ice is more dense than water, no matter the temperature of the water.

7th/8th grade science FTW


i guess you failed the class then. Water is less dense of how do you explain the ice cubes in your coke or icebergs in the ocean.
#35
Quote by Dimebag22
Yeah, thanks.

Also, a couple minutes research got me this.

Density of water:

1000 kg·m−3, liquid (4 °C)
917 kg·m−3, solid

But what would happen if you upped the temp?


well the heat would cause the ice to melt due to the increase in temperature. But it would float as the boiling would create a marginal decrease in density i believe.
#36
^The change is pretty minuscule, I believe. Much less than the difference in density from solid to liquid.
Quote by Roger_Waters
^ wow i actually almost missed that hahaha iforgot your a genious


Don't blame us if we ever doubt you, you know we couldn't live without you.

I'm oedipus, bitch, the original balla
Bust out my 9, light up your Impala
fuck that police!
#37
Quote by iforgot539
^The change is pretty minuscule, I believe. Much less than the difference in density from solid to liquid.


indeed hence why i said it would still float, albiet until the heat caused the ice to melt.
#38
Quote by Draken
indeed hence why i said it would still float, albiet until the heat caused the ice to melt.

But lets just say it doesn't melt. It would still float, therefor is less dense than water.
Ticking away the moments that make up a dull day
You fritter and waste the hours in an offhand way
Kicking around on a piece of ground in your home town
Waiting for someone or something to show you the way
#39
WILL IT FLOOATT!

will it float

WILL IT FLOOATT!

will it float



IT FLOATS!
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#40
Quote by Dimebag22
But lets just say it doesn't melt. It would still float, therefor is less dense than water.


which is what i said but it's boiling water which mean the water not melting is a scientific impossibility as the water cannot defy the law of its own physics.
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