#1
e 5 (optional)
B 7
G 5
D 5
A 3
E XXXXXXX


I just wrote an arpeggio with this chord and it sounds good but can't find out the name of it.
#6
what the hell.... 1-you have gelly hands 2-cant tell wich chord it is , some kind of Csus4
#8
Quote by Donaldguitar
e 5 (optional)
B 7
G 5
D 5
A 3
E XXXXXXX


I just wrote an arpeggio with this chord and it sounds good but can't find out the name of it.


notes are (from bass to treble) C - G - C - F# (- A)
Notes are all in the scale of G, but there's no D which is the 5 th, so not many candidates there.

If you consider the scale of C you do have a 5th, the G, and the F# is a diminished 5th
So I would go for a C5 add b5 (add 6)

Sounds uhm... creative!
#9
Quote by Donaldguitar
It's a C Power chord with a Flat Six


its a C power chord ------OK
with a flat sixth------------OK
but does it have a 4th too or its not C?

edit: not 4th, i meant a diminished 5th
Last edited by swinghead at Nov 5, 2007,
#10
With the risk of making an idiot out of myself...

Could someone point me the flat 6th (which is an Ab in C) in this arpeggio please?

Could someone tell me how this could be a sus4 when there's no 4th (=F)?
#12
as for the 4th i just apologized, then a #4th is a diminished 5th, last but not least a C's 6th is A (on the E higher string in our case)
Last edited by swinghead at Nov 5, 2007,
#13
Quote by swinghead
as for the 4th i just apologized, then a #4th is a diminished 5th, last but not least a C's 6th is A (on the E higher string in our case)

Indeed so why did you say flat sixth then
#14
what context are you using it in? it's rather ambiguous on it's own but with no particular context i'd say Am13 (1st inversion)
#15
Quote by ElBarto2811
Indeed so why did you say flat sixth then


because i was replying to another post using a quotation

and i thought it didnt matter that much
Last edited by swinghead at Nov 5, 2007,
#16
Quote by Donaldguitar
It's a C Power chord with a Flat Six

yahhh as soon as u see that 355 pattern u know its some version of a power chord pretty much
#18
Quote by imposiitin
it's Cb5 add 6


Nah, if you're naming it from C the F# would be a #11...there's already a perfect 5th in the chord (G)
Am13 is the best/'cleanest' name for it imo especially given no context.
#19
Quote by Steve The Plank
Maybe you should just eliminate the idea of being a LEAD guitarist or a RHYTHM guitarist and just come to terms with being a guitarist.


Quote by Mike Huber
I used to steal legos from my friend. He always had the coolest pieces.
#20
Pretty much what Galvanise69 and a few people like him said. Working with the C as the bass note it's a C5addb12add13. I agree this looks messy, but I don't really think you can name it any other way, as the two C's and the G strongly suggest a C5 chord as the root that this chord is built around.
sig goes here
#21
Quote by Skater901
Pretty much what Galvanise69 and a few people like him said. Working with the C as the bass note it's a C5addb12add13. I agree this looks messy, but I don't really think you can name it any other way, as the two C's and the G strongly suggest a C5 chord as the root that this chord is built around.


From C it would be C5#11add13. the C & G can also easily be seen as strongly suggesting an Am tonality. to me it makes more sense to use Am13 instead of C5#11add13, but to each his own
#23
Why is it a #4 in this case? F# and Gb are the same note, so what is causing you to pick one over the other? To my mind it makes more sense to call it a flat fifth, since that's normally the sound people are going for more.

Stash Jam, please explain how you get an Am13. I'm not disagreeing with you, I just don't think I understand your thought process. I mean, you've got C G C, so I'd say that very strongly suggests a C-powerchord. So how do you come up with an A chord out of that?
sig goes here
#24
Quote by Skater901


Stash Jam, please explain how you get an Am13. I'm not disagreeing with you, I just don't think I understand your thought process. I mean, you've got C G C, so I'd say that very strongly suggests a C-powerchord. So how do you come up with an A chord out of that?


A C G F# = 1 b3 b7 13 = Am13

The 3rd and 7th of the chord are the key notes defining the quality of a chord (when prseesnt)
as far as naming this chord it's essentially a matter of preference given a random chord like this with no context/progression. Sure if there was only C and G you would definitely say C5, but the #11 and 13 added to the mix makes it somewhat of a pointless stretch to associate it all with C5 imo, but either way is technically valid, cool?
#25
Yes certainly cool. I normally go straight for the fifth when naming a chord, cause the fifth is the strongest, but in this case I agree that it leaves the ugly #11 and 13 notes, which are annoying to write and read. I agree with your naming it A, except for the fact that you're saying it's an Am13, but the other notes are below the A, not above it, and certainly not an octave up from it, so how can you say it's a 13? Shouldn't it be an add6 or something?
sig goes here
#26
Well the 5th is the same for paralell major and minor chords, so it's not a strong determinant of the chords quality, i.e. C major = C E G & C minor = C Eb G, see it's the 3rd thats making the chord major or minor.
Same deal with 7ths ...
Cmaj7 C E G B = E & B indicate Major7
Cm7 C Eb G Bb = Eb & Bb indicate Minor7
C7 C E G Bb = E & Bb indicate Dominant 7 chord.

See how C & G are constant in all those chords, and the 3rd & 7th are indicating the quality of the chord. This is helpful to know for playing lead as well.

And back to the Am chord, since the m7(G) is present you wouldn't use add to indicate the F#
#27
Quote by Skater901
Why is it a #4 in this case? F# and Gb are the same note, so what is causing you to pick one over the other? To my mind it makes more sense to call it a flat fifth, since that's normally the sound people are going for more.

There is already a perfect 5th in the chord.

-SD
#29
Like Stash Jam says C(#11) except any chord that goes into the 2nd 8ve should really have a b7 in it also in this case Bb. Some made up chords really aren't really worth naming, as notes must be related before they can be named. How do you finger that chord anyway you must have looooong fingers.
#30
Yeah fair enough Stash Jam. However, if you'll notice, the C and G, as you said, are the same throughout all those chords. Also, every chord is a C chord. The scale degrees that dictate what type of chord are, as you said, the third and seventh. So, considering that no matter what the third and seventh are, the chord is still a C because of the first and fifth, would you not therefore use the first and fifth to work out the base of the chord?

Thank you for clearing that up SilentDeftone. That makes perfect sense. Although, a query for you: what if you had both the fourfth and the fifth in the chord, and then the note in between? Not that I reckon it'd happen, but if it did, what would you call it?
sig goes here
#32
Quote by Skater901
Yeah fair enough Stash Jam. However, if you'll notice, the C and G, as you said, are the same throughout all those chords. Also, every chord is a C chord. The scale degrees that dictate what type of chord are, as you said, the third and seventh. So, considering that no matter what the third and seventh are, the chord is still a C because of the first and fifth, would you not therefore use the first and fifth to work out the base of the chord?



Well it depends, since the 5th is so neutral it's the most common tone to be omitted from chord voicings. Point being since chords often wont even have the 5th so you'll need to look elsewhere to find out what the chord is. This of course varies a bit between styles, so if you're into music that uses mainly power chords then sure the root and 5th are all you've got, but moving into more extended chords you won't be seeing the perfect 5th as much.
Last edited by Stash Jam at Nov 8, 2007,