#1
Im just wondering, does metal (and it's sub genres) follow the basic Pentatonic rock scales. My band are having problems getting songs written and I think that knowing what scales are good to work from will help a great deal.
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#2
Yes.
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#3
A lot of the solos do, but the riffs for heavier stuff are more Aeolian (natural minor) and Phrygian, mixed with random chromatic and diminished bits. Sometimes they're just random notes, too, like a lot of Slayer songs. I just mess around w/ out necessarily sticking to particualr scale and write down anything I think sounds cool.
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#4
**** sounds better if u ask me if u dont use modes cuz a solo should use the entire neck just use a scale and dont worry about the mode
#5
in turn dosent rock use the blues scale

so technicly learn that?
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#6
Quote by natedapunk
**** sounds better if u ask me if u dont use modes cuz a solo should use the entire neck just use a scale and dont worry about the mode


Modes cover the entire fretboard. I think you must misunderstand modes and their usage.

If your band is holding an Am chord, and you're playing the C major scale over it, you're really playing A Aeolian. You can play this anywhere on the neck, not just starting on "A".


Threadstarter, you can use minor pentatonic if you want. Black Sabbath and Metallica would be great places to start if you want to see how it's used in metal.
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#7
^ is right. sabbath and metallica both have bits of pentatonics mixed with other kinds of scales and/or modeal usage. ALOT of metal uses pentatonics, the idea for me at least is to take the pentatonic scale and give it hell, really dig into it. when you're playing it lighter it can give it a kinda blues/rock/alt rock sound (actually theres a ton of different ethnic scales that use pentatonics) play it a little quicker and with a little more oomph if that makes sense. give it some balls
#8
Quote by aeon20k
in turn dosent rock use the blues scale

so technicly learn that?



Blues Scale = Pentatonic = Rock Scale

I was asking if Metal followed the same rules, which it seems to, thanks for the help guys.
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#9
The Blues scale is NOT the Minor pentatonic. The Blues scale has an added b5, which, in my opinion, can help with your metal riffs, because it can sound real evil.
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#10
Agreed. The minor pentatonic and blues scale, although very similar, are not exactly the same.

So. Scales and stuff. Well let me start off by saying that you can use whatever scale you want to write heavy riffs. However, as you guessed, some scales do sound better than others for writing heavy stuff.

The main one used for metal is the Aeolian, or natural minor. The pattern for that is TSTTSTT. The other one that's good is Phrygian, which is STTTSTT. The Locrian, STTSTTT can be good, but the flat fifth can get over-used, so I'd advise using the Phrygian and throwing in the flat fifth whenever you think it fits.

Anyway, there's some info there for you to work with. Just remember that at the end of the day you can write whatever you want. If it sounds good, put it in. You don't need to stick to the scale.
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#11
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think Enter Sandman has some blues scale elements in it. So does Dream Theater's Peruvian Skies. (DT managed to throw a random Sandman riff in one live version!) They don't sound very bluesy to me, the b5, or tritone, can really add a nice element. Try some b2 as well.

So, ignoring my rambling, pentatonics would be great for metal. But remember that it's not always the scale/notes used that makes things heavy.
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#12
The best example of the b5 in metal is definately Black Sabbath's self titled track.

The main riff is literally two notes: the low G, G an octave up and then C#. It's like a devil sandwich.

Phrygian is a great one. I use this for writing riffs more than solos. When it comes to soloing, I tend to use the Aeolian, Harmonic Minor and Minor Pentatonic.

And to a particular person above, solos are free expression. If someone wants to use just a couple of positions, that's up to them. One great guitarist of note who didn't use a lot of positions in his solos is Tony Iommi. Most of his really well-known solos occur in just a few positions, "octave positions" not included.
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#13
It is used, but I would certainly branch out from it. Randy Rhoads would be a good place to start looking at use of more modal composition in metal. There are also guys like Michael Romeo who dig using whole tone scales and other scales outside of the greek and church modes, but that's probably more advanced than you want right now.
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