#1
I'm not that new, but I also don't know that much.

What I want to know is any scale, say the minor pentatonic scale, say I play in G can I move up and down to any other keys? Do I have to return back to the key I started in, and end on the note I started?

And if I play a scale do I have to play the whole scale, or can I play some notes, but not every note on every string of that scale?

Thanks.
#2
well in reference to your 2nd question, not hitting every note or going up and down in the miuddle of the scale (from my understanding) is how solos are made. anybody correct me if im wrong, but im pretty sure abou that. but its not techinically called a scale, its just *based* on the scale. hope that helps.
#3
a scale consist of 8 notes for it to be a scale it must start and end on the same note sure u can play more notes u can go as far past ur root note as u want. but in theory a scale 8 notes must have a start and a finish

minor pentatonic
start at the g note

e----------------------------------3--6------------------
b---------------------------3--6-------------------
g--------------------3--5-----------------------------
d--------------3--5----------------------------------
a--------3--5-------------------------------------
E-3--6-------------------------------------------------

if u move it to a its in the scale of a if u move it to e its in the scale of e but theres lots of lessons to read for other scales u should really check them out
#4
yes a solo is only based on a scale. no song really has an actual scale played ascending or descending in it. for your first question - you always have to stay in key depending on what the rythem part behind the solo or lead part is doing. if your soloing by yourslef [a solo solo] them do whatever the **** you want - there is no need to stay in key in that situation
#5
metal metal head seems like a n00b. he cant really explain himself and inst using correct terminology
#6
You shouldn't think of scales as something that binds you, they should guide you. You can change keys, mix scales, and play out of scale notes and for your second question you play notes from a scale but not all of them ascending or descending that would sound very repeatative just pick different notes do some sliding, legato, bending and vibrato.
#7
Quote by ihatethischord
metal metal head seems like a n00b. he cant really explain himself and inst using correct terminology


dude if im wrong correct me but im pretty sure to call it a scale its got to have 8 notes lol and the dude wanted to know a scale im not going to give him a bunch of scales maybe u should give him one. chordhater
#8
Quote by metalmetalhead
dude if im wrong correct me but im pretty sure to call it a scale its got to have 8 notes lol


scales don't need 8 notes in fact the most used ones don't have 8. pentatonic=5 notes, major scale=7 notes
#9
Quote by SOAD_freak777
scales don't need 8 notes in fact the most used ones don't have 8. pentatonic=5 notes, major scale=7 notes


including the root the major has 8. its debatable i guess if that one counts but i see what your saying. so i guess as long as it has a "root" note its a proper scale
#11
like I said its debateable. why do ppl call playing scales in the 8th note or the 16th or the 32th you cant end the C major scale at B now can you?

If u want me to admit theres only 7 notes there fine..i stand corrected theres only 7 notes. but you hear 8 different notes in that scale from start to finish. so like i said its debateable
#12
sorry to say but theres actual 7 notes in the major scale. the 8th note you're thinking is the octave of the 1st note.

and the 8th 16th and 32th you are talking is rhythm. quarters notes 1 count per beat 8th notes 2 counts per beat and so on.

and i dont think theres actually any end to a scale its just a rule that people put up there.
#13
ok 7 notes 8 different sounds maybe i should have said that in the last reply. but what i mean is you do play 8 different frets. but the stuffs gotta be even 7 just doesnt sound right. i guess i should make sure i have no typos cuz of you ppl LOL but i do count the root in the scale..and i play it that way aswell
#14
Thanks for the help.

So is the lead guitarist always in the same key as the rhythm guitarist?

Also what do bands do with only one guitar player, like Muse? Do they just play anything, going into different scales and keys?
#16
Another question I have, is if you you put your guitar in say E flat tuning do you still play everything in the same positions as if it was in standard?
#17
Generally a song stays in 1 key, but it's not uncommon to find key changes in
certain parts of some songs. More typically in Jazz.

A scale is a collection of notes within an octave where each note is assigned,
sequentially, a scale degree.

If a rhythm guitarist and lead were to play in different keys, it would most likely sound
really bad. But, lead solo's can and frequently do use notes that are both in the
key (or scale) and go outside the key. A scale doesn't mean you HAVE to play
ONLY those notes. It's a structure that gives you a reference point to play around.