#1
I'm starting a garage band with some of my friends. I have a line 6 spider 3 75 watt amp which only has one channel. The problem is that we need the amp for a micrphone. Is their any way to connect a guitar and a guitar in the same amp? Please respond ASAP. Thnx
#2
Its possible but it depends on what your goign to play on how / if it will work. If your goign to be playing the spider with the amps distortion then the microphone will have a distorted effect on aswell. If you run the amp clean then its possible.

You need an adapter jack. Basically you plug it into the input on the amp and then the other side of the jack will have two inputs. one for the guitar, the other for the microphone so yes, it can work.

Wether or not it will sound good is another story all together..
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#3
ive done it and it doesnt sound realy good, it plugged into this thing at the back of my amp. it sounded really tinny.
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#4
but isnt there some kind of preamp type thing (i dont know what its called) that can control the microphone seperately from the guitar?
#6
Doesn't that amp have a 1/8" CD input? You could get an adapter for the mic cable and plug it into that, I'm pretty sure you won't get distortion on the vox that way.

One thing to warn you, though, if you have a lot of gain on your amp settings and the mic's plugged into the regular input, it'll feedback like ****.
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#7
^It'll work with an adaptor, but as the ppl above me said, it will distort the sound.
I've heard of people talking about phase cancellation with adaptors though (kinda like what muso_ chris said), which would bugger up the sound/tone
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#8
You could do all that but it is gonna sound like CRAP!!! Buy another amp at pawn shop or something. I know you can scrounge up 50 - 100 bucks. If your not resourceful enough to do that you aint gonna make it in a band.
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#10
do NOT use a guitar amp. you'll end up blowing the speaker. IF you don't have the money for a PA setup then buy a used bass amp. the speakers in a bass amp are constructed to deal with a much wider frequency range than a guitar amp.
#11
Quote by z4twenny
do NOT use a guitar amp. you'll end up blowing the speaker. IF you don't have the money for a PA setup then buy a used bass amp. the speakers in a bass amp are constructed to deal with a much wider frequency range than a guitar amp.


Most guitar speakers actually cover a very big range. You aren't going to blow a speaker based on the frequencies you try and put through it. The way you blow a speaker is by overdriving the speaker with more power than it can handle. There seems to be this fear about running these "bad frequencies" through speakers and amplifiers and blowing them. The risk comes when the speaker cannot reproduce the frequencies as well and you need to turn them up louder than they should be to try and hear then.

As to the initial poster, you can do basically anything. However that probably won't sound great, its going to get very muddy sounding, and I don't think its worth the hastle. Also running a vocal microphone through an ordinary guitar or bass speaker cabinet will not sound too great as you will not have a tweeter, and will really lack in the highs because of that.
Last edited by take_it_t at Nov 8, 2007,
#12
Just buy a cheap mixer and a single pa amplifier., shouldn't be too expensive.
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