#1
So, I've went out and tried all the basses that I can in my price range, and it's pretty much between these two. I haven't tried the P yet, but I've played a MIM P-Bass and liked it a lot. However, I know the Squier will be different because of the different wood and pickups. I'm buying either an Ashdown Electric Blue 15 or an Ashdown MAG300 head with a 4x10 cab depending on how much money I get, and the music that I play is heavily influenced by Muse, Flyleaf, InMe and Daisy Chainsaw. I also use a Boss TU-2 Tuner, a Rocktron Zombie Distortion and an Electro-Harmonix Small Clone. The Zombie will be replaced by a Keely-modded Pro-Co Rat or a Russian Electro-Harmonix Big Muff. I've also tried Fenders (suprisingly, not as good as the Squier I played), Ibanezes (eewwww) and Peaveys (splinters!).

I currently have no other bass, seeing as my OLP MM2's broke. I'm currently borrowing my girlfriend's Westfield.

So, it's just between these 2. Which one wins?

Vintage Modified Precision

Vintage Modified Jazz
#2
i would say the jazz, they are two very different basses, and both sound good, but for me it comes to the jazz because it looks so f***ing nice, and is really nice to play. I'm normally a precision man, but i would choose the jazz over the precision in this case. That maple neck with block inlays is just the s**t
Quote by Freddy_Walker
stevo 192 lol mate u a beast! Such a rebel!!!


'90 Fender P-bass lyte
Squier P bass special
Trace Elliot Series 6 head and cabs
Fender American Stratocaster
Vintage Teisco electric guitar
Fender princeton 650 dsp amp
#3
That's half the problem- they both look amazing!

The P-Bass has that awesome Sid/Dee Dee look to it that I love, but the Jazz is gorgeous, too!

Urgh... difficult...
#4
Well, the tonal options should dictate the purchase here - what sound do you want? You can make a Jazz sound like a Precision more than you can make a Precision sound like a Jazz, but neither can get the other's tone.

Personally, I'd get the Jazz in a heartbeat - having a maple bodied bass with a maple fingerboard should provide clarity that just doesn't exist on basses of that price.

EDIT: PS about the body wood - my Warwick has a maple body, but there are no post $300-$400 basses with agathis bodies. Agathis is simply a lesser quality wood than what's on any Fender.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
Last edited by thefitz at Nov 6, 2007,
#5
Quote by thefitz
Well, the tonal options should dictate the purchase here - what sound do you want? You can make a Jazz sound like a Precision more than you can make a Precision sound like a Jazz, but neither can get the other's tone.

Personally, I'd get the Jazz in a heartbeat - having a maple bodied bass with a maple fingerboard should provide clarity that just doesn't exist on basses of that price.


I'm going for a clear, punchy tone and a Muse/Flyleaf distorted sound.
#6
Quote by Aidy Damage
I'm going for a clear, punchy tone and a Muse/Flyleaf distorted sound.

The Jazz will give you more clarity, and let's just say that... more of your tone will be used if you decide to get a Big Muff.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#7
Quote by thefitz
The Jazz will give you more clarity, and let's just say that... more of your tone will be used if you decide to get a Big Muff.


Used as in seeping into the distorted sound, or lost?

Also, the P-Bass is made from Agathis and I hear that it's not a good wood. True?
#8
Quote by Aidy Damage
Used as in seeping into the distorted sound, or lost?

Also, the P-Bass is made from Agathis and I hear that it's not a good wood. True?

Used as in heard in the distortion, not lost. Rumour has it that I'm not a fan of Big Muffs and that they totally nullify any true low end. I also have to sneeze *aaah* http://www.bassplayer.com/article/overdrives/Dec-06/24670 *choo*

Anyway, yes, like I said in the previous post, Agathis is not a good wood. It's only found on cheap guitars. I think it's better than plywood and low-grade basswood, but that's about it. I have maple on my $1000 bass.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#9
Quote by thefitz
Used as in heard in the distortion, not lost. Rumour has it that I'm not a fan of Big Muffs and that they totally nullify any true low end. I also have to sneeze *aaah* http://www.bassplayer.com/article/overdrives/Dec-06/24670 *choo*

Anyway, yes, like I said in the previous post, Agathis is not a good wood. It's only found on cheap guitars. I think it's better than plywood and low-grade basswood, but that's about it. I have maple on my $1000 bass.



You crack me the f*ck up Emmett Fitz-Hume. Taco says go for that vintage jazz, that thing looks sweet with that maple neck and rectangle inlays. And I totally agree with Fizitz about getting a jazz to sound closer to a P, than getting a P to sound like a Jazz.
Last edited by Sly Taco at Nov 6, 2007,
#11
It all depends. Jazzes can give a wider range of tones, and P basses have one tone, but that tone is never out of place.

Try them out and see.
Warwick freak of the Bass Militia. PM Nutter_101 to join

Quote by elliott FTW
Damn you and Warwickyness

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+1
#12
Quote by gm jack
It all depends. Jazzes can give a wider range of tones, and P basses have one tone, but that tone is never out of place.

Try them out and see.


I've tried them both, hence my confusion.
#13
Quote by Aidy Damage
I've tried them both, hence my confusion.

Again, I think the Jazz has better construction and overall tonal flexibility - and maple fretboards on cheap basses isn't that common.
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#14
Quote by thefitz
Again, I think the Jazz has better construction and overall tonal flexibility - and maple fretboards on cheap basses isn't that common.


Main thing I remember about that bass is how the fretboard was like wiping my arse with silk... sod it, I'm getting the jazz!
#16
Quote by Sly Taco
^ahahahahah you englishmen rule
get the jazz, thank us later


If you'd like that last post as a spoken soundclip, I'd be happy to do it.
#17
Jazz is a great bass. It's earned a place in my setup, super punchy, super clear, built as solid as a brick shithouse.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#18
Quote by Aidy Damage
Main thing I remember about that bass is how the fretboard was like wiping my arse with silk... sod it, I'm getting the jazz!

first time I read that I thought it said milk, I was sitting here thinking what the ****!

Anyway, I'm usually a P-Bass man but in this case I'd go for the jazz, it's a better bass all-round really for the price.
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Looks like you had a big bowl of Downs Syndrome for breakfast.



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#19
definitly made the right choice there mate, let us know how you find it...
Quote by Freddy_Walker
stevo 192 lol mate u a beast! Such a rebel!!!


'90 Fender P-bass lyte
Squier P bass special
Trace Elliot Series 6 head and cabs
Fender American Stratocaster
Vintage Teisco electric guitar
Fender princeton 650 dsp amp
#20
I just want to say one thing. I would recomend you buying a used Fender bass than a Squire. Squire just isn't quality stuff and I think a MIM Fender would still be better than a Squire. I know some people will disagree for reasons I am all too familiar with but hey, this is what I think.
Rhythm Harmony Melody
#21
Quote by SOCOOLITHURTS
I just want to say one thing. I would recomend you buying a used Fender bass than a Squire. Squire just isn't quality stuff and I think a MIM Fender would still be better than a Squire. I know some people will disagree for reasons I am all too familiar with but hey, this is what I think.


As a rule, yes, you're right. But the Vintage Modified Squiers are not your average run of the mill starter basses.

Squiers QC has improved dramatically with this new line, for starters. Much less duds, much better construction and wiring. Hardware is more durable. The tone pot actually acts as a tone pot, not a "treble frequencies allowed, y/n?" switch. Obviously an improvement on the Squier Affinity and Standard series.

The pickups - they're not proper Duncans, of course, but they're much better than Squier stock, and I'd say just as good as MIM stock. Extremely clear, punchy and tight sounding. You can get plenty of proper Jazz tones out of them, and the tight sounding, extremely solid maple body just adds to it.

The maple fretboard - the ONLY Fender style bass that offers this for less than £600.

The natural finish - again, it's not very common in entry level right up to mid range basses by Fender.

The fact that it is a brand new bass for half the price of your average MIM, and still less than you'd usually pay for a decent condition used MIM Fender.

Only real letdown is the lightweight bridge, but the stock Jazz bridge is notoriously shoddy throughout the Fender range. You only escape this if you either fit an aftermarket bridge to your bass, or you get one of the Fenders that offers a BadAss II as standard.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
#23
Quote by indie-bassist
first time I read that I thought it said milk, I was sitting here thinking what the ****!

So I'm the only one who wipes his arse with milk?
Quote by Cody_Grey102
I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..