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#1
I know we all want to be as great as Steve Vai and Joe Satriani and John Frusciante etc, etc.

But I really want to be as great as them, and I'm going to be, but I need to figure out the journey to get there.

I know John Frusciante practiced 15 hours a day but WHAT did he practice?

Steve and Joe practiced 10 hours a day but I still don't know what he practiced

I definitely don't mind practicing that much I have before and I enjoyed it alot.

But I've made so much stride in my music that I'm really not looking at passing high school so I need to become as great a guitarist as I can.

I want to learn how to take the music out of my head and put it through my amp.

What can I practice/learn/play to become great?

I'm taking lessons and I'm taking beginning music theory next semester.

I know I will spend the rest of this life perfecting my music technique, but I want to be able to play the type of music John played when he was 20- when I'm 20

I don't know much else about Vai or Satch

any advice?
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#2
A good place to look is steve vai's ten hour work out. Don't feel like you need to spend that long though. There's a fine line between dedication and obsession.
#3
Quote by Spamwise
A good place to look is steve vai's ten hour work out. Don't feel like you need to spend that long though. There's a fine line between dedication and obsession.



Oh man I want to drop out so I can play guitar- I know I can't- but man I love guitar so much- you don't even know

It's the greatest thing in the world

I've checked out- but it's kind of "boring"...well it's repetitive....

But I really need to practice

right now I'm grounded from guitar
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#4
why john frusciante? he's definitely not in the same league at all with vai
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#5
Quote by jakekilgore666
why john frusciante? he's definitely not in the same league at all with vai


Because the music he writes, in my opinion is far better than Vai's and just amazing. The emotion, feel and energy he puts into his music is untouchable at present.

He's the modern Jimi Hendrix

I think he's on the same level though- he's finally getting his chops back

of course all of this is my opinion
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#6
Well, I support your "practice 10 hours a day" thing, but seriously, don't drop out of school to play guitar. Even if you do become the new (insert amazing guitarist's name here), you will still benefit from the knowledge you get from school.
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#7
^^^ or talk to your school counselor and try to get as many music courses as can. if your school offers stuff like jazz band, you can relate school to guitar. or take stuff like music composition or theory. then you can develope your own practice routine.
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#8
Quote by OThugSd
Well, I support your "practice 10 hours a day" thing, but seriously, don't drop out of school to play guitar. Even if you do become the new (insert amazing guitarist's name here), you will still benefit from the knowledge you get from school.


I'm not- I want to though- because I know I could be playing guitar and doing something that makes me happy. But I am really smart

my grandparents want me to be a doctor or something and "help people" but they don't understand that I am..with my music

I just need techniques and tabs and workouts and stuff to do- to become an amazing player

EDIT:
Quote by Sirwinston89
or talk to your school counselor and try to get as many music courses as can. if your school offers stuff like jazz band, you can relate school to guitar. or take stuff like music composition or theory. then you can develop your own practice routine.

yea we have nothing
we have a jazz band I'm thinking of joining
but besides that band/orchestra/choir/glee club is all we have

but I'm going to take music theory this year and advanced theory next year
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#9
Quote by TDKshorty

right now I'm grounded from guitar


if you really took your guitar playing as seriously as you claim i doubt you would do anything to get yourself grounded from it. Im sorry but you dont seem to have any idea what the word dedication really means.
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#10
Quote by hoondog
if you really took your guitar playing as seriously as you claim i doubt you would do anything to get yourself grounded from it. Im sorry but you dont seem to have any idea what the word dedication really means.


Well I was really sad at one point in time and I didnt do anything for 3 weeks so I failed 2 classes- barely (i almost brought them back up)

I had lost the will to do anything- so my grandparents thought I still had those F's but every quarter the grades restart so I have an A now. But they didn't know that and I got grounded

They think guitar playing is a bad thing though- they don't understand it/me

But I see their view- but I think they're being unreasonable about

this is besides the point
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#11
You can do your 10-hour practise schedules and finger exercises as much as you like, but if it was just down to that, there would be thousands of Steve Vais out there.

Having amazing technical skill is a good step towards being a great guitar player, but what you really need to work on is your sense of musicality. If you just focus on technique, you'll end up one of the many (and there are A LOT) pointlessly fast bedroom guitarists with no feeling.

If you want to become a talented musician, push yourself musically: spend the time you're not spending with your guitar listening to new music (not even necessarily guitar music), not in the background, but absorbing it. Try transcribing songs you like. Make yourself come up with at least one new lick every day and write it down. Think of a musical idea in your head and try and play it first time. Play along to CDs. Jam with other musicians. Just spend time with your instrument. There is no sure-fire way to becoming the next "great" guitarist.

Being able to play guitar is a wonderful skill you'll have for the rest of your life. The most important thing is that you enjoy it.
#12
Quote by Nolly
You can do your 10-hour practise schedules and finger exercises as much as you like, but if it was just down to that, there would be thousands of Steve Vais out there.

Having amazing technical skill is a good step towards being a great guitar player, but what you really need to work on is your sense of musicality. If you just focus on technique, you'll end up one of the many (and there are A LOT) pointlessly fast bedroom guitarists with no feeling.

If you want to become a talented musician, push yourself musically: spend the time you're not spending with your guitar listening to new music (not even necessarily guitar music), not in the background, but absorbing it. Try transcribing songs you like. Make yourself come up with at least one new lick every day and write it down. Think of a musical idea in your head and try and play it first time. Play along to CDs. Jam with other musicians. Just spend time with your instrument. There is no sure-fire way to becoming the next "great" guitarist.

Being able to play guitar is a wonderful skill you'll have for the rest of your life. The most important thing is that you enjoy it.



haha it's really the other way around for me. I'm a musician, not a guitarist, but in order to be the best musician, I need to be able to be the best guitarist I can be. Speed isn't as important to me.
If I could make a living off of recording avant-garde records- but I have a smaller chance of that.
I love all kinds of music;classical, avant gard, IDM, electronica, funk, rap, hip hop, R@B, jazz, pop, punk, acoustic, indie, grunge, garage rock...it gos on and on
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#13
Quote by TDKshorty
Because the music he writes, in my opinion is far better than Vai's and just amazing. The emotion, feel and energy he puts into his music is untouchable at present.
He's the modern Jimi Hendrix

I think he's on the same level though- he's finally getting his chops back

of course all of this is my opinion


Have you heard Lotus Feet? Tender Surrender? For The Love Of God? Liberty?

and every other frickin Vai song? he puts more emotion into his songs than anyone else i believe
#14
What you need to start is to make sure you know HOW to practice. The best
info available is right here: www.guitarprinciples.com.

If you don't know how to practice, then WHAT you practice or for how long isn't
going to make all that much difference.

Steve Vai and others who practice like 10 hours a day -- do you wonder how they
endure it? My guess is they don't. They ENJOY it. They enjoy it because they're
good at it. When you get good at something you tend to enjoy it more. A lot
of people aren't very good at practicing which is why they don't like it.
#15
Quote by edg
What you need to start is to make sure you know HOW to practice. The best
info available is right here: www.guitarprinciples.com.

If you don't know how to practice, then WHAT you practice or for how long isn't
going to make all that much difference.

Steve Vai and others who practice like 10 hours a day -- do you wonder how they
endure it? My guess is they don't. They ENJOY it. They enjoy it because they're
good at it. When you get good at something you tend to enjoy it more. A lot
of people aren't very good at practicing which is why they don't like it.


Thanks for the site... well practicing guitar is one of the funnest things for me, so I do enjoy it.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#16
Steve Vai also graduated from Berklee School of Music...I'm sure that helped :p
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#17
Just play alot, listen alot, and DONT drop out of school.

Play to enjoy it... not to be as good as anyone in particular. If you play alot and enjoy doing it, your going to get good, period.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Nov 9, 2007,
#18
Quote by sitheris
Steve Vai also graduated from Berklee School of Music...I'm sure that helped :p

If I remember right, so did John....
I don't even shred
#19
John Frusciante went to Guitar Institute in California

John Mayer went to Berklee- but neither Vai or Mayer graduated
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#20
no offence, but you sound a bit clueless.

there are those who've got it, and theres those who ain't, and its not all just about practice. Everyone on this site wants to be the next guitar god, but not everyone is deluded. Don't give up or anything, I would just say lower your hopes, because you're bound to be dissapointed
#21
TDKShorty, after reading through this thread, you're pretty much in the same boat I am. I want to be a fantastic player too, but as far as practicing goes, I'm clueless. I've tried Vai's 10 hour workout, but aside from finger dexterity, I don't feel like I'm really learning anything about music. Shredding through scales is nice too, but without knowing why they work (Or more importantly, how you can apply them to songwriting and improvisation), it seems to kind of defeat the purpose.

While it probably doesn't help with technicalities that much, I find I learn more applicable things by analyzing songs. I'm a Fruciante nut too, for example, tonight I found the Power Tab for Subway to Venus by RHCP, and I could probably say that it's the best thing I've done the whole week. I was able to get new chord shapes/patterns, easily see how they fit into the context of the song, and actually use some of that information to write a few funk riffs.

This is a discovery I've just made tonight, so in the future, I'll probably do some of Vai's 10 hours, shred through a new scale each night of the week with a metronome, and analyze new songs.

Also, you can pick up some great phrasing tips from just learning AC/DC solos, in a bluesy-rock context of course (pentatonics).

Oh, and don't drop out of school. Whatever you do.

Keep me posted on what you're practicing, if this gives you any ideas. Because I'd love to hear them...
#22
Well I've been so musical about guitar that I was never really technical and stuff.

So I really want to be able to say "hey this is played for this reason and that not wasn't played for that reason" and "since you're playing this, this will go here"

What's a good scale that would fit the chords of Am, Bm and C?
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#23
Quote by TDKshorty

What's a good scale that would fit the chords of Am, Bm and C?


A Dorian off the top of my head. Most A minor scales would, as A B C is 1 2 b3 with a root of A (correct me of I'm wrong gurus)

In my opinion, it comes down to you whether you will make it to at least some degree. It's not that you got it or you don't; life gives you PLENTY of time to amend whether you are talented or not, it's just whether you are willing to do it, and endure not having the relatively well off and easy life you could doing something different. It's down to your will and your desire.
Last edited by CloserToTheSun at Nov 10, 2007,
#24
Quote by Nebjy
If I remember right, so did John....


Frusciante's dad did. (his name is also John Frusciante).
#25
Quote by TDKshorty
Well I've been so musical about guitar that I was never really technical and stuff.

So I really want to be able to say "hey this is played for this reason and that not wasn't played for that reason" and "since you're playing this, this will go here"

What's a good scale that would fit the chords of Am, Bm and C?



Whatever the **** sounds right. You shouldn't stick to a scale. It would be better if you shredded through whatever sounds the way you want instead of some scale. Therefore you should practice chromatics, as they'll get your fingers coordinated every which way, instead of one scale which you'll be stuck on (this happened to me when I learnt the major scale for the first time).

Otherwise though, I feel exactly the same way you do about guitar. I have a guitar in my hands as I write this comment.
#26
Quote by Thekillerbob
Whatever the **** sounds right. You shouldn't stick to a scale. It would be better if you shredded through whatever sounds the way you want instead of some scale. Therefore you should practice chromatics, as they'll get your fingers coordinated every which way, instead of one scale which you'll be stuck on (this happened to me when I learnt the major scale for the first time).

Otherwise though, I feel exactly the same way you do about guitar. I have a guitar in my hands as I write this comment.


what are chromatics?

I had a guitar in my hands but it's right next to me- but I'm way too tired to play- it's 1am and I need to go to bed soon
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#27
Quote by TDKshorty
Well I was really sad at one point in time and I didnt do anything for 3 weeks so I failed 2 classes- barely (i almost brought them back up)

I had lost the will to do anything- so my grandparents thought I still had those F's but every quarter the grades restart so I have an A now. But they didn't know that and I got grounded

They think guitar playing is a bad thing though- they don't understand it/me

But I see their view- but I think they're being unreasonable about

this is besides the point


What?
#28
chromatic exercises are basically exercises based on the chromatic scale, which is everything half step between 1 note and its octave. Download John Petrucci's rock discipline for some good ones.
#29
This thread is full of bollocks. Rather than copying other people, how about being original?

Works for me.
#30
Agreed. You won't be big if you aren't original. Technical finesse doesn't work anymore. Look at Japan, there are tons of shredders.
^ seconded.

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#31
Froosh could play Never Mind The Bollocks by the time he was 12 I think... it was a matter of some pride for him. So that's maybe a practice point. And seeing as he doted on Hillel, I would learn the Chilis first three albums. Hope that helped!
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#32
Quote by Jackolas
This thread is full of bollocks. Rather than copying other people, how about being original?

Works for me.


Isn't the whole point of having guitar influences to sample from is to develop a favorite style based on guitarists you like? I wouldn't call that copying other people.

And to the guy that said play anything you want, you want to learn at least a few scales even if you take that approach. After awhile they won't be just scale shapes, and you'll be able to play what you want by ear. Learning intervals helps a lot with this mentality.

Also, if you're taking guitar lessons, tell your teacher that you're this serious about it. As soon as I told him I wanted to go to college for guitar, he had me learning to build chords, application of modes, lead phrasing, and other things. If you don't tell him, he'll just think that you want a few chords to impress the ladies or something.
#33
No offense but I'd rather not learn the "Nevermind The Bullocks" album- It's just alot of powerchords

But I do need alot of help with creating songs out of powerchords- for choruses and stuff. But not playing them, but it won't hurt to try

I don't want to play like Froosh and Vai but I want to be able to play like Froosh and Vai and then some.

I have the creativity but not the skill to really do everything I want
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#34
It's not about playing just like them, indeed it's more than that. When Steve Vai or that guy from Peppers pick up a guitar and start playing, they can simply 'fill the room' with sound and entertain people (and themselves), even without a band. The one thing those great guitarists truly have in common is that they are hungry for music, and they play what's inside their heads. Maybe it's a good idea to shift your emphasis from the physical aspect to the mental aspect. I'm not saying to neglect the physical aspect - of course you must practice your weaknesses; the point I'm trying to make is that when you change the way you look at things and add something fresh to your practice routing, chances are you'll learn something useful.

I know it's very abstract, but maybe it's useful to you in some way. A great way to train your inner musician is to improvise over backing tracks.
#35
Playing music is both a physical and mental activity. It's the interplay between
them that creates the music. An audience has the luxury of music being only
mental. As a player you have to be concerned with both.


You're given a certain amount of natural talent. You can't do anything about that.
Beyond that there's the skill of being able to move yourself constantly forward.
That's a skill you can do something about. Since it effects everything about your
playing, it's really the most important skill you can learn. But, most people don't
recognize this as a skill, so its ignored and they languish when they've reached the
limits of natural ability.

When you get skilled in this area, you pretty much know you can get any place
given some time invested. When you're aware of the time component, you get
more patient. Things take as long as they take. To a certain extent, you just
have to give up caring about results and apply your skill at progressing at what
you can do right NOW to move forward. That's all you really have.
#36
Quote by Jackolas
This thread is full of bollocks. Rather than copying other people, how about being original?

Works for me.


What do you mean exactly? are you saying learning other peoples licks will make you less original? Just trying to understand where youre coming from.

BTW if you do think that, I would totally disagree.
#37
from what ive read so far. you dont seem to have much knowledge at all to connect reality to your fantasy. if you really want to be as good as the guitar Gods, you're going to have to devote time to it. dont say you're too tired to play (thats just copout anyway. i work 10hours a day and still practice). instead, take every little bit of time you have to practice base scales, blues scales, modes, and time signatures (especially 5/4 and 7/8).

there really isnt anything anyone can suggest you that you cant firgure out by searching trhough a library or a music store. there are many books about scales and modes that do a lot in the training process.
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#38
I have a question before I give any specific advice.

How old are you?
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#39
Looks like you're going through the same thing i did, you want to practice but you dont want it to be boring right? ok, look at some of john petrucci's psycho exercises there are some really good ones in there but after that look at something like satch boogie and play your way through that and then look up satch talking about modes, its very helpful, and all in the meantime, during study, look at some music theory every now and then.
#40
Quote by ashra
from what ive read so far. you dont seem to have much knowledge at all to connect reality to your fantasy. if you really want to be as good as the guitar Gods, you're going to have to devote time to it. dont say you're too tired to play (thats just copout anyway. i work 10hours a day and still practice). instead, take every little bit of time you have to practice base scales, blues scales, modes, and time signatures (especially 5/4 and 7/8).

there really isn't anything anyone can suggest you that you cant firgure out by searching through a library or a music store. there are many books about scales and modes that do a lot in the training process.


Well I always play until I can't. When I said I was tired- I didn't mean I was sleepy, I was really tired, really. I could just say the excuse that I was up all night the night before but it's not going to change anything.
I never get tired enough to not play- but last night I was really tired.
I do devote alot my time- but this past week I haven't been able to play because I was grounded.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
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