#1
Okay, i've got a circit that has a 6v power supply, a circuit that is basically a potential divider, with a 47kohm fixed resistor placed before a 100kohm rotary potentiometer, however as far as i was aware, a resistor of this type produces a fixed resistance when increased

However the voltage is varying, as that is what we are measuring, so is this a change in levels between voltage and current to produce the R? And is there an explanation for why the voltage levels throughout the turn of the spindle o nthe rotary pot isn't a straight line, but in fact a curve?
#2
Is the pot in series with the fixed resistor, and are you measuring the voltage at the ends of the pot?
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#3
Yes it's in series: 6v (power pack) -> fixed resistor -> rotary potentiometer -> 0v with a voltmeter placed across the rotary potentiometer

I had to put it in that set up so as to get a set of readings that had a middle sort of value, where as the lower resistances (such as 0 ohms, or 100/470 ohms) when used and with the measuring of the voltage across the pot gave a reading of basically 0.01 volt lower than max reading when it was half way through it's rotation and then jumped suddenly down - is there a specific cause for this, as i will have to explain it
#4
Well the voltage of the pot would be something like:

Vpot = Vsource * Rpot / (Rpot + Rfixed)

So Vpot doesn't vary with Rpot linearly.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.