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#1
so....... I'm not bored or anything, but I really could use a bit of help. You see I need to obtain my British Literature standards for my High School, and I would like some advice on who to read up on. Now I know that the average pit monkey doesn't know where britian is, or can't tell me what literature is, but I'd like your advice anyway. I need one writer from each period, thr romantic period(romanticism) the renissance, 17th and 18th century, realism, and modernism. So I'd just like a few suggestions on what authors, and what books by said authors. Thank you in advance, and i hope that this is a better idea than me making the thread about my mudkipz addiction that I was seriously considering....


peace and love


-Teh Wiz?
#2
Shakespeare for the romanticism, Romeo and Jliet should do. Wait for Dinky, she's the English wiz kid.
Looking to buy a Fender Jagstang, u sellin?
#5
Renaissance-Shakespeare: 'Hamlet'
17th century-John Donne or Milton's 'Paradise Lost'
18th Century-Johnathan Swift: 'Gulliver's Travels'
Romanticism- Samuel Taylor Coleridge: 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner or Mary Shelley's Frankenstein.
Modernist-Thomas Hardy: 'Far from the Madding Crowd', 'Jude the Obscure'.
Realist- I'm not completely sure, but a quick Wiki search says George Eliot's Middlemarch.
#6
Since it's British literature, I'd assume you can also use poets.

Romanticism - Samuel Taylor Coleridge - The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (poem)
Renaissance - The 16th century, so you can use Shakespeare. Choose whatever, I personally like Macbeth.
17th & 18th Century - Milton was early 17th. Try Paradise Lost. Another poem.
Realism - George Eliot - Adam Bede. That's more an historical novel, but she was a big realism novelist.
Modernism - TS Eliot - The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. My favourite poem.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#8
The Romantic Period is all about poetry. Wordsworth and Coleridge, Keats and Byron and Shelly. For great Gothic Romanticism check out Mary Shelly's Frankenstein. It should be noted that though Jane Austen was a contemporary of the Romantics, her work is more difficult to classify.

The Renaissance and a little beyond (to about 1660) is characterized by such greats as Shakespeare and Marlowe, Ralegh, Ben Johnson, and John Milton to name a few. Not to mention other powerhouses like Hobbes, though he occupies a real apart from literature.

In the Restoration and 18th century you'll find John Dryden, Daniel Defoe, Alexander Pope, Oliver Goldsmith etc. etc. I can't really recommend specific works; this isn't quite my area of strength. Actually, none of these really are
#10
And I forgot to even mention Elliot. Dinkydaisy is right: Prufrock is excellent.
#11
Quote by schecter_guy
TS eliot although don't expect to understand it at all

^don't worry, I'm pretty well read, except for all of this british literature. that and I can take my time with all of this reading
#14
Quote by Child In Time
Damnit, didn't get in before Dinky.

Gutted.



By the way TS, if you want to do Prufrock I have a big analysis in note form somewhere. If you wanted I could try to find it and type it up for you.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#16
Quote by wizards?
I'd absolutely love that, but it sounds like a lot of work for you to do. If you want to I'd greatly appreciate it, but if you don't I won't mind

I've found it. Give me a while and I'll type it up, and email it to you.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#18
Sent you it.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#19
Nah, I agree with Dinkydaisy.


But, I'll ad John Keats for poetry. Ode To A Grecian Urn.

W.H. Auden- Funeral Blues
Jane Austen
J.M. Barrie
Daniel Defoe
Charles Dickens
Nick Hornby
George Orwell
Stephen Fry
Friends, applaud the comedy is over.


I'd dance with you but...


#20
I get the feeling Stephen Fry doesn't fall into any of his categories.

Unless this is another Stephen
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#21
Quote by Dinkydaisy
I get the feeling Stephen Fry doesn't fall into any of his categories.

Unless this is another Stephen


Just something to throw in, ha.


Stephen Fry= I would go incredibly homosexual for.
Friends, applaud the comedy is over.


I'd dance with you but...


#22
Quote by Child In Time
Just something to throw in, ha.


Stephen Fry= I would go incredibly homosexual for.

Me too. Were I not a chick.

Why does he have to be gay? It just places him even further out of reach ;_;
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#23
+ you know, er, Stephen Fry is pretty modern.


Why do I have to be straight?!
Friends, applaud the comedy is over.


I'd dance with you but...


#24
Quote by Child In Time
+ you know, er, Stephen Fry is pretty modern.


Why do I have to be straight?!

Why don't you ask the American army for some of that gay gas they've been working on?

Then you can take pictures of Stephen and give them to me.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#26
Quote by Child In Time
No, they didn't go through with making it.

Wtf?!

They probably figured that fanboys would use it to get their idols to fall in love with them, or vice versa.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#27
How great would it be though, instead of the atomic bomb at Hiroshima, a Love Bomb.

Japanese Emperor on the radio: "Our war has taken a turn to our disadvantage. They've turned our men gay."
Friends, applaud the comedy is over.


I'd dance with you but...


#28
Quote by Child In Time
How great would it be though, instead of the atomic bomb at Hiroshima, a Love Bomb.

Japanese Emperor on the radio: "Our war has taken a turn to our disadvantage. They've turned our men gay."

Japanese fashion might actually improve though.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#29
Dinky, thank you sooooo much, that really helped. I understood the poem pretty well, but that just brought it over the top. I really enjoyed reading it, and it will help me greatly. I am in your debt now. thanks again
#30
Caucer, for really, really old stuf (1000years), Shakespeare, Dickens, Jane Austen, Orwell, but that's very modern by comparison.
Quote by DrewsGotTheLife
yea man, who ever doesnt like pantera or think they suck doesnt like metal, end of discussion, they changed the freakin world n made history, so don't be sayin they suck, have respect, same goes for machine head n lamb of god cuz their good too
#31
Quote by Child In Time
How great would it be though, instead of the atomic bomb at Hiroshima, a Love Bomb.

Japanese Emperor on the radio: "Our war has taken a turn to our disadvantage. They've turned our men gay."


That is a real weapon, incase you were joking.
Quote by DrewsGotTheLife
yea man, who ever doesnt like pantera or think they suck doesnt like metal, end of discussion, they changed the freakin world n made history, so don't be sayin they suck, have respect, same goes for machine head n lamb of god cuz their good too
#32
Quote by freddaahh
Caucer, for really, really old stuf (1000years), Shakespeare, Dickens, Jane Austen, Orwell, but that's very modern by comparison.

Do you mean Chaucer, the very basis of English literature?

I get the feeling you just listed off some famous authors you've heard of.
The will to neither strive nor cry,
The power to feel with others give.
Calm, calm me more; nor let me die
Before I have begun to live.

-Matthew Arnold

Arguments are to be avoided; they are always vulgar and often convincing.
#33
Quote by freddaahh
That is a real weapon, incase you were joking.


I wasn't. Though it was never built, so technically it's not a real weapon.

*in case.
Friends, applaud the comedy is over.


I'd dance with you but...


#34
Quote by Cal UK
Shakespeare for the romanticism, Romeo and Jliet should do. Wait for Dinky, she's the English wiz kid.


shakespeare is pre-romanticism.

Romanticism - Samuel Taylor Coleridge - The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (poem)
Renaissance - The 16th century, so you can use Shakespeare. Choose whatever, I personally like Macbeth.
17th & 18th Century - Milton was early 17th. Try Paradise Lost. Another poem.
Realism - George Eliot - Adam Bede. That's more an historical novel, but she was a big realism novelist.
Modernism - TS Eliot - The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. My favourite poem.


personally i wouldnt do shakespeare for renaissance simply because shakespeare is a topic in his own right. because of cultural factors, shakespeare's pretty timeless, i'd go for something thats more renaissancey. donne and herbert and the other metaphysicals are pretty swell, and not too difficult to read. if you want to read some really interesting prose, thomas nashe is fascinating, but can be kinda challenging.
my name is matt. you can call me that if you like.
#35
Shakespeare and John Donne are amazing for romantic literature.
And something like Wuthering Heights perhaps??
I hope it doesn't seem, like I'm young, foolish, and green.
Let me in for a minute, you're not my life but I want you in it


O Dayya, te echaré de menos, siempre

Y siempre
Y para siempre
#36
Quote by BlackLuster
Shakespeare and John Donne are amazing for romantic literature.
And something like Wuthering Heights perhaps??


shakespeare and donne are not romantics. at least not in the literary sense of the word.
my name is matt. you can call me that if you like.
#37
i think he meant romanticism with a small 'r' rather than Romanticism the movement.
#39
Quote by Dinkydaisy
Since it's British literature, I'd assume you can also use poets.

Romanticism - Samuel Taylor Coleridge - The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (poem)
Renaissance - The 16th century, so you can use Shakespeare. Choose whatever, I personally like Macbeth.
17th & 18th Century - Milton was early 17th. Try Paradise Lost. Another poem.
Realism - George Eliot - Adam Bede. That's more an historical novel, but she was a big realism novelist.
Modernism - TS Eliot - The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. My favourite poem.


TS Eliot was American. Otherwise, thumbs up.

Edit: Well, for half of his life. He wrote a lot of his most famous works, including Prufrock, while an American citizen, and he was raised in Missouri and educated in Massachusetts.
And yet, to me, what is this quintessence of dust? Man delights not me: no, nor woman neither... nor women neither.
Last edited by Caustic at Nov 8, 2007,
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