#1
i used to think minor pentatonic scales worked well over a song in a major key, e.g. via a lead guitar part. but now i think: what? surely it would sound odd and dissonant, or just bluesy? why is the minor pentatonic seemingly so much more emphasised and talked about than the major? is it for its bluesy effect?

im just confused as to the context when to use either pent scale. or the blues scale, for that matter.
i need to get a better signature.
#2
I'd say because it's easier to use, sadly =/
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#3
to me the pentatonic is a geared a bit more for that classic rock, early metal sound. the blues scale is really cool imo but i find myself using the minor pentatonic far more often. it works in more places too. for example: minor pentatonic can be used in Iron Maiden tunes, SRV solos, and John Coltrane charts. its all in how you voice it.
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#4
I think the Penatonic or at least natural minor scales are used alot in Major key songs. Alot of Coheed and Cambria leads seem to be in a natural minor scale. so i dont see why u couldnt use a minor penatonic in a major key, just make sure it doesnt sound bad. Its not exactly what u use, but what u play in the scale.

As for choosing between a blues or minor penatonic, both are only one note from each other. so i think u could use em interchangebly.
#5
"Standard theory doesn't explain blues very well" -- that's paraphrased from
one of my Jazz books.

Some of it relates to simply having a Blues type of sound, or from a more theoretical
standpoint the minor pent over major provides certain color tones and other tones
that sound good in a certain way. Minor over major isn't necessarily an "avoid"
situation.

Blues and Rock really adopted the pent minor, IMO, because it's easy to use
harmonic generalization to improvise with it. Translation: you don't have to
worry much about the chord changes, just pick the minor pent in the right key
and off you go! (BTW, the flip side of this is harmonic specificity aka melodic
control, change running, playing the changes, chord tone soloing, chord outlining,
etc... BOTH are valid improv approaches. But specificity is HARDER to do and requires
a lot more skill.)

Also don't think pentatonics are limited to Blues and rock. They're used a LOT in
jazz too. Sometimes in similar ways, sometimes different. They're looked at as
good scales to generalize with.
#6
Quote by spoonylove90
to me the pentatonic is a geared a bit more for that classic rock, early metal sound. the blues scale is really cool imo but i find myself using the minor pentatonic far more often. it works in more places too. for example: minor pentatonic can be used in Iron Maiden tunes, SRV solos, and John Coltrane charts. its all in how you voice it.

the blues scale is basically the minor pentatonic scale. i really don't understand why they gave it a different name for such a small difference..
#7
Quote by MATTTHEMOP
i used to think minor pentatonic scales worked well over a song in a major key, e.g. via a lead guitar part. but now i think: what? surely it would sound odd and dissonant, or just bluesy? why is the minor pentatonic seemingly so much more emphasised and talked about than the major? is it for its bluesy effect?

im just confused as to the context when to use either pent scale. or the blues scale, for that matter.


because in blues you play the minor over the major progressions almost all of the time and in rock, power chords are used a lot as well as ideas from blues so it fits each situation well. it also has that bluesy attitude sound to it that goes well with rock and obviously blues.

some songs though cant work with this all the time. some can switch back and forth between the two. the thing is you just need to know when to use them. like if the song has an A major and an F# minor in it, a good bet would be to use the A major pentatonic. but you could also play the minor over it if you wanted. an example would be something like bold as love by hendrix or life without you by SRV. they both kinda stwich in and out of the major and minor. or a blues example would be key to the highway. but i think people might not realize they are playing in the major because there is that minor chord. they might just think of it as playing in F# minor, which is the same as A major really.