#1
Ok, so I got a book on scales. "The Ultimate Guitar Scale Bible". And I'm working on writing some stuff but I was wondering. How do I chose what kind of scale to match my song with. I mean I obviously know if I'm in the key of C, to do a scale in C. But which scale do I use, Aeolian, altered Dominant,Augmented Dominant, Chromatic, etc? Hell I barely know what those names mean, I just know how to play them. So how would I decide what best suites my music?
#2
My guess, in this case, would be just to listen and decide on the one that sounds best.
#3
Quote by J.A.M
My guess, in this case, would be just to listen and decide on the one that sounds best.

That would be a really good idea . . . . but considering this book has 130 scales . . . . . Is there a particular way to tell what scales go with which. . . I mean it's supposed to sound more classical and clean. I'm not trying to do some serious shredding or anything complex here.
#4
Maybe i'm just a pain in the ass but i think it would be easier to explain if you had a chord progression as an example of what you're going to solo over. (if it is solos you're talking about / maybe its just a melody or whatever)
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#5
Well actually, I think I should have just posted asking more about the scales. Well for this particular riff, I just want a small interlude. I'd like to write it out myself. But I need to know more about scales in order to find the right one(Which was what I thought I was asking). There are no chords because it is all picked out. I guess my real question isnt just for this specific riff. For all future riffs, so I wont have to continuously post on here. How do I determine what types of scale fit specific genres.
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#6
Look at the chords you use in your chord progression, their root notes/types and make a scale from that?



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      #7
      Ok, I tried doing that, but I ended up finding like 10 scales right off the back. The root notes go like this:
      B A G F#

      The rythm to the notes would go like:
      B A G F# G A G F# and then just repeat . . .
      Quote by die_kenny_die
      ate a girl out on her period...

      i regret nothing.


      I know how to shred paper, does that count?
      #9
      I think just practice would help. Learning what sounds certain scales make of different chords seems like something you would pick up with time.

      For that particular thing it looks kinda like the key of D (C# is used 4 times, F# 3) so i guess you could just play some scale relative to D (like E dorian, B aeolian) depending on what kind of sound you want. I guess if you played B aeolian or B natural minor you could get a sadder sound than D major/Ionian.

      I don't know if that's true because i don't have anyone to teach me this stuff and i'm still learning but that's my guess.


      edit: damn, i didn't see what spamwise wrote

      ....oh well, atleast i said the right thing (b aeolian) so that's cool
      “Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


      -Max Planck

      ☮∞☯♥
      #10
      Quote by metal4all
      I think just practice would help. Learning what sounds certain scales make of different chords seems like something you would pick up with time.

      For that particular thing it looks kinda like the key of D (C# is used 4 times, F# 3) so i guess you could just play some scale relative to D (like E dorian, B aeolian) depending on what kind of sound you want. I guess if you played B aeolian or B natural minor you could get a sadder sound than D major/Ionian.

      I don't know if that's true because i don't have anyone to teach me this stuff and i'm still learning but that's my guess.

      just for future reference, aeolion is natural minor. two names for the same thing.
      #11
      Quote by Spamwise
      just for future reference, aeolion is natural minor. two names for the same thing.

      I know, thanks though. I worded it really weird. I was trying to say they were the same thing in case he knew it as one name or the other.
      “Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


      -Max Planck

      ☮∞☯♥