#1
So I was reading that one guy's topic about what scale to use, and how he said his book has over a hundred different scales. Now I'm sure all of thme have their place somewhere, but we all know that many of them won't be used by the average musician. So what scales are used often? I'm compiling a list.

Major/Major pentatonic/Major modes
Minor/Minor pentatonic
Harmonic Minor/Harmonic Minor Modes
Chromatic scale


those are all the ones I've come up with. I mean there are scales like the melodic minor, whole tone, and diminished but from what I know they aren't very common. Or at least not as common as the ones i've listed.
#2
Quote by Spamwise
So I was reading that one guy's topic about what scale to use, and how he said his book has over a hundred different scales. Now I'm sure all of thme have their place somewhere, but we all know that many of them won't be used by the average musician. So what scales are used often? I'm compiling a list.

Major/Major pentatonic/Major modes
Minor/Minor pentatonic
Harmonic Minor/Harmonic Minor Modes
Chromatic scale


those are all the ones I've come up with. I mean there are scales like the melodic minor, whole tone, and diminished but from what I know they aren't very common. Or at least not as common as the ones i've listed.


Common in rock music at least, in middle eastern, hungarian, russian, jazz, and many other forms of music they are practical.
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#3
Well I don't plan on playing in any hungarian bands in the future.

So then what are some scales for jazz?
#4
Personally Im not a big fan of those types of books. I think you can get alot of mileage out the scales you listed. in many cases those books are gimmicky, although I dont know which one your talking about... so who knows maybe its worthwhile.
#5
Quote by GuitarMunky
Personally Im not a big fan of those types of books. I think you can get alot of mileage out the scales you listed. in many cases those books are gimmicky, although I dont know which one your talking about... so who knows maybe its worthwhile.

yeah i definitely agree with the gimmick thing. my grandma got me this book a while ago for christmas with hundreds of chords in it. It's nice and everything, but all you have to know are the formulas, and then you've gone and saved yourself a big chunk of money.
#6
Quote by GuitarMunky
Personally Im not a big fan of those types of books. I think you can get alot of mileage out the scales you listed. in many cases those books are gimmicky, although I dont know which one your talking about... so who knows maybe its worthwhile.


+1, He made a good point. It really doesn't matter how many scales you know. You can do a lot with what you have listed. It's all about voicing. And you don't have to strictly follow the scale while you're playing. Don't be afraid to experiment outside the scale. Chances are that if you experiment outside the scale, youll be playing one of the off-the-wall scales in that book you're talking about.
#7
Quote by Spamwise
Well I don't plan on playing in any hungarian bands in the future.

So then what are some scales for jazz?

I like the hungarian scale

What about melodic minor?
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


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