#1
Today my teacher showed me that the pentatonic major scale has modes. I kind of knew it already, but actually putting two and two together didn't exactly happen in my head. Are these named off of the scale degree like the major scale modes, or do they even have names at all?
Quote by Mazzakazza
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#3
So then the modes of F major pentatonic would be F Ionian Pentatonic, G Dorian pentatonic, A Phrygian pentatonic, C Mixolydian pentatonic, and D Aeolian pentatonic?
Quote by Mazzakazza
Play Meshuggah. It is the solution.
#4
I'd think you would just take the pentatonic formula and apply it to each note.
#5
to utahotc

Pentatonics technically have modes. Technically. As they are a scale, and as every scale has its own modes, pentatonics have modes.

But...

You wouldn't apply the modes of the pentatonic scale the same way as the major scale. Only two of the pentatonic modes (major and minor) can be used to build triad chords. And any way, why? Wouldnt you rather use the major scale and its modes, which can all be used to build triads, and use 7 non accidental notes instead of just 5?

And to answer your question, some people call the modes of the pentatonic scale by weird ambigious names, IE pentatonic minor, pentatonic major, pentatonic neutral and pentatonic suspended (thats NOT in order and theres another one). Some people, if not most, call the the modes just 1st, 2nd and third.
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Last edited by demonofthenight at Nov 8, 2007,
#6
Spamwise, I think you're wrong. I think. I read in a guitar magazine that the major pentatonic uses the same notes as the minor pentatonic, therefore resulting in different scale degrees. To show you what I mean: E minor pentatonic: E G A B D. Now, the relative major is G major. So the G major pentatonic, using those same notes, is G A B D E. The degrees are now 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6. Now, I could be wrong, and the magazine I got that information from wrong, but I doubt it. I'm pretty sure that's how it works. Anyone else know for sure?
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#7
Quote by Skater901
Spamwise, I think you're wrong. I think. I read in a guitar magazine that the major pentatonic uses the same notes as the minor pentatonic, therefore resulting in different scale degrees. To show you what I mean: E minor pentatonic: E G A B D. Now, the relative major is G major. So the G major pentatonic, using those same notes, is G A B D E. The degrees are now 1, 2, 3, 5 and 6. Now, I could be wrong, and the magazine I got that information from wrong, but I doubt it. I'm pretty sure that's how it works. Anyone else know for sure?

well yeah all major scales have their relative minor scale and vice versa which is what that is. Just A major and F# minor have the same notes, and D and B minor have the same notes, etc.