#1
hey guys ive been playing guitar for 5 years+ im self taught and for most of those years i just concentrated on riffs, but over the last year ive been working on shredding i am dedicated and i do practice for a few hours everyday but i cant seem to get to grips with shredding.

ive tried the whole starting slow speeding up but it just doesnt seem to work for me, i hold the pick right, i can play the open string really fast with the alternate picking style but once i try to move my fingers and jump from string to string i start fluffing notes.

im starting to wonder if my fretting hand can keep up with the picking hand or if its the other way about, i don't wanna be malmsteen speed ( but it would be nice) but just fast enough to rip a really cool solo instead of my usual john frusciante paced solo ie staying in one spot ( no offense to mr fru fans as hes my favourite guitarist).

so if anyone can suggest anything worth getting or watching to help id be most great full ive seen plenty of shredding vid techniques but you never see close enough to the hand enough to pick up on the technique.

cheers kevin
#2
I am just now getting the hang of shredding. But just barely. The thing I noticed that helped me was to make sure you keep your fingers and wrist fairly loose and relaxed. Hopefully you don't have high action on your guitar. Being able to fret a note with relaxed fingers and minimal pressure helps you move around the fret board.

Hopefully I helped a little. I'm still a n00b myself.
#3
Quote by koikomoru
I am just now getting the hang of shredding. But just barely. The thing I noticed that helped me was to make sure you keep your fingers and wrist fairly loose and relaxed. Hopefully you don't have high action on your guitar. Being able to fret a note with relaxed fingers and minimal pressure helps you move around the fret board.

Hopefully I helped a little. I'm still a n00b myself.


How is high action going to help him?
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#4
he said hopefully he DOESNT have high action...
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#5
I started shredding about four weeks ago and already my speed has drastically improved, and with clarity. Just spend time with a minor scale over and over, being mindful of where your hands are. If your fingers hang out on your picking hand, make sure you get used to tucking them in, as the more compact your hand is the easier it is to control. More than anything, just think about the most economical picking sequence, i.e when your upstrokes and downstrokes are. If you just jump in and try to play fast with the wrong sequence you'll just get really good at playing messily.
#6
I have some green peppermint ice cream, looks kinda exotic. As for shredding, low action helps, as do lower gauge strings and a clean fretboard. However these arent essential, they just make it easier. Ive only been playing for 11 months, i can play some pretty fast metallica solos, and im learning to sweep pick a little.

Something I can suggest, maybe learn something slowly with a metronome, half tempo or maybe less, and once you can get the rhythm perfect while playing slowly, speed it up, but once you get it close to full speed cleanly, just try and play it full speed, even if its a little sloppy, but practice it alot of times full speed, trying to get it right, and then after doing that for a bit, slow down just a bit, and focus on perfecting those tiny little bits you might keep missing. Its something I do, and it works in the end, and doesn't turn out sloppy either.

And the four main techniques you will want to learn for shredding are sweep picking, string skipping, two handed tapping and speed/tremolo picking i think. All or any of these techniques can just be used with any scale or mode to "shred". Once you learn these, you will probably find that alot of shred solos you try to learn will use these techniques, and seeing as you will already have the techniques down learning them should be easy =D

Anyhow i hope this information will help. And just try to focus on improving all the other soloish techniques too, such as trilling, hammerons, pullofs, vibratos and note bends.
#7
just try practice with strech your fingers, it will make your fingers moving more fluently, and always start slowly, just doing this for 2-3 weeks, you wil know the difrnt
#8
I've been playing for about 2 years, started shredding after about one, the way i learned was by getting all the solos/songs i wanted to learn...and startin gthem at half time...and everytime i played it flawlessly i'd knock up the metronome 5bpm, if i couldn't get it at the new speed i'd go back and start again, this teaches your fingers where they need to be and when...so once you get up to high speeds you dont actually have to think about where your fingers are going, they just do it, it took me an average of around 2-3 weeks to get everything i tried perfect so yeah...worked pretty well for me
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#9
Ah yes, the classic guitarist problem.
You have to achieve a state of blissful self-peace. Basically, zoning out, but in a more politically correct form.
If you concentrate too hard, you'll fluff up. If you don't concentrate, you'll drop your pick. If you reach the balance, you'll do a Petrucci in his psycho exercises.
#10
Quote by BFun
he said hopefully he DOESNT have high action...


Ahh, my mistake... Wow, reading skills=failure.
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#12
You can play slowly for a thousand billion years and still not end up being able
to play fast.

The key is what you're actually DOing when you're playing slowly. Not slow playing
itself.

People almost seem to be looking for some sort of surface solution -- like what
exercises will help me play faster? If I play slowly and turn up the metronome
by 5BPM each week, will I be fast after 2 months? If I use 1.0 mm pick will I play
faster? Should I lower my action?

All those types of question indicate that person has all the practice depth of a
mud puddle. If that's as deep as your practice gets, that's how good your playing
and speed will be.

So, most likely you don't need another video or another book with all the "Secrets
to Speed" gimmicks. What you need is practice skill.
#13
Quote by edg
You can play slowly for a thousand billion years and still not end up being able
to play fast.

The key is what you're actually DOing when you're playing slowly. Not slow playing
itself.

People almost seem to be looking for some sort of surface solution -- like what
exercises will help me play faster? If I play slowly and turn up the metronome
by 5BPM each week, will I be fast after 2 months? If I use 1.0 mm pick will I play
faster? Should I lower my action?

All those types of question indicate that person has all the practice depth of a
mud puddle. If that's as deep as your practice gets, that's how good your playing
and speed will be.

So, most likely you don't need another video or another book with all the "Secrets
to Speed" gimmicks. What you need is practice skill.


Good response, but any suggestions on what kind of practice skills or how to apply them?
#15
The Rock Discipline instructional video of John Petrucci help me a lot to start shredding. It focused more on the technical side (although there's a great lesson about chords) and have some really good tips that i haven't found in others video.
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#16
Quote by koikomoru
Good response, but any suggestions on what kind of practice skills or how to apply them?


I'd have to say, my approach is quite different:

To be honest, I'd recommend improvising to build up your speed and technique. Of course, chromatic runs, scalic runs, sweeping runs all with a metronome, etc, are a good way to boost speed, however.....

When you improvise often, you actually apply the musical creativity to the guitar - the exact purpose of the instrument. Start off slow; using pentatonic scales, blues, major, minor, etc, and slowly increase the speed at which you improvise. Use faster rhythmic patterns, apply alternate picking, sweeping, whatever, as long as it all starts off slowly. With time, speed builds up. If you notice, good shredders can pull a face-melting solo from the air, due to their ability to improvise one.

Just practicing your chromatic scale and speed building techniques won't teach you how to shred; but it will make your fingers fast. It's like reading a driving manual for a car - once you finish reading, you still don't know how to drive a car unless you actually practice doing so.

Keep in mind: Improvisation is the key to composition.
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Last edited by Dimebag Dave at Nov 9, 2007,
#17
Dimebag Dave hit the nail on the head.

I've never really focused on building shred, but I do technical excercises AND improvise a lot, and somehow I've ended up with good speed for such a relative beginner.
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#18
Well, maybe that works for you, but it never did for me. Improvising has
a very different focus than practicing and working on specific things.

You can't really focus on any specific technique or problem when you're improvising
as most of the focus is "composition in real time". When you're improvising
you will tend to do the things you worked on in practice and if all you do is
improvise you'll end up doing the same stuff over and over and over...

You really need to make your fingers do new things all the time to keep your
improvising fresh. That means practicing them. When you do enough of it, those
things will start showing up in your improv.


"Just practicing your chromatic exercises and speed building exercises won't
teach you to shred." No, but that's not really good practicing either.
#19
Quote by linkinwayne
Ah yes, the classic guitarist problem.
You have to achieve a state of blissful self-peace. Basically, zoning out, but in a more politically correct form.
If you concentrate too hard, you'll fluff up. If you don't concentrate, you'll drop your pick. If you reach the balance, you'll do a Petrucci in his psycho exercises.


I've dropped my plectrum quite a few times lol

but I can play pretty fast. I'm working on getting up to Petrucci in his psycho exercises.
#20
Start slowly, any decent guitarist can tell you that, just start off slowly and gradually build up the speed.
#21
dude first work on finger strength on the frettting hand, that will help with trills and stuff like so and fast licks canalways be accomplished with legato, than start working on picking speed, by running chromatic at 16th nots at different tempos, or doing scale runs. the key with picking is to start slow and legato to have control. combining the two is great to listen to, listen to malmsteen and vai, they do it well, aswell as paul gilbert
#22
It will take a lot of time to learn how to shred like some of the guitar legends out there. You can't just expect to pick up the guitar and in a couple years be able to shred. You will have to work a lot at it. Pick a shred part and play really slow (you will need a metronome for this). Play it over and over at that speed until you can do it without even thinking about it. Then, increase the speed by about 5 beats per minute or so. In time, you should be able to play it faster. Within a week, you should be able to play what you were working on at any logical speed. Obviously, don't expect to ever be able to play like 12 32nd notes in the time of 4 at 300 bpm.