#2
Well, I'm not very fond of calling the Phrygian Dominant scale "Spanish Phrygian", but a lot of people do it. "Harmonic Major" sounds pretty stupid too, as the regular major scale already has the natural 7, which is what makes the Harmonic Minor "harmonic".
#3
Quote by kyrreca
Well, I'm not very fond of calling the Phrygian Dominant scale "Spanish Phrygian", but a lot of people do it. "Harmonic Major" sounds pretty stupid too, as the regular major scale already has the natural 7, which is what makes the Harmonic Minor "harmonic".

Harmonic Major is a different scale from Harmonic Minor.

Harmonic Minor:
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7

Harmonic Major:
1 2 3 4 5 b6 7
#4
Quote by Vittu0666
Harmonic Major is a different scale from Harmonic Minor.

Harmonic Minor:
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7

Harmonic Major:
1 2 3 4 5 b6 7

I didn't say they were the same. My point is:

To go from Minor to Harmonic Minor, you raise the 7th.
To go from Major to "Harmonic Major" you flatten the 6th.

The raised 7th in Harmonic Minor facilitates a stronger resolution to the root, because you'll get a V7 chord. As I understand it, this is the reason it's called "harmonic"

The reason for calling the 3rd degree of the Harmonic Minor scale "Harmonic Major" is probably the fact that it relates to a Harmonic Minor scale in the same way that a regular Major and Minor do. But the alteration made to the Major scale (b6) doesn't have the same function that the b7 in Harmonic Minor does.

I'd just call it Ionian b6.