#1
So i think its time to get a decent mixer.

I have a band going and we want to do some recording. I guesstimated needing about 6-8 channels. If there are 5 members, isnt that about right? As of now i have this dinky little behringer 4 channel. Anyone have experience with a good mixer or recording programs? Right now i have N-Track and i hate it. My dad has Traction and he thinks its pretty good. Other people i know have Pro Tools or Audacity.

So whats a good mixer and program? Opinions anyone?
#2
6-8 tracks should do it, i'd go with a 8 track personally. look up mackie's there generally good mixers. and also make sure it has phantom power always helps. Saves the need for outboard power units when it comes to condenser mics. I use Logic mostly. and it's a dam good programme.
Professional Mixing available at request.

Everton FC
#4
Presonus firepod is preety damn good value for money.... Comes with cubase bundled in....
Frank Zappa's not dead. He just smells funny.
#5
Does your computer have a firewire port?

Look at the Alesis Multimix (preferably the firewire ones because they send each individual track to your program) or the Phonix Helixboard (which is what I want to get ).

I use Cakewalk Sonar Home Studio 4; it was only $80 and I can have as many tracks as I want.
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Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#6
Quote by FacingUsAll
Does your computer have a firewire port?

Look at the Alesis Multimix (preferably the firewire ones because they send each individual track to your program) or the Phonix Helixboard (which is what I want to get ).

I use Cakewalk Sonar Home Studio 4; it was only $80 and I can have as many tracks as I want.


+1 for the alesis! i forgot bout those bad boys! i would go with one of them if i was you.
Professional Mixing available at request.

Everton FC
#7
Quote by Footzyrama
6-8 tracks should do it, i'd go with a 8 track personally. look up mackie's there generally good mixers. and also make sure it has phantom power always helps. Saves the need for outboard power units when it comes to condenser mics. I use Logic mostly. and it's a dam good programme.

hmm k

And that firewire thing, it sounds like a good thing to have. Ill take a gander.
#10
You dont want to record Vocals and drums and strumming at the same time.. first of all.. The drums would go into the mic, second of all, the strumming would as well.. Unless you isolate your mic around your head, which is a pretty bad idea.. When I record with more then my self, I do bass, Guitar and drums in one.. with 4 mic hooks ups, that leaves you with 4 mics for the drums.. unless you get XLR to jack converters.. then you have 4+10 for drums and then you do the Vocals.. unless you off course want to mic amps, then you have 2+10, if you get the XLR to Jack Converters and you would have to isolate your Mics on the amps so they wont get drums into em.. and now I am just confusing I bet :S
Last edited by Gtar-o-mania at Nov 8, 2007,
#11
Recording acoustic drums is the most demanding, assuming you don't try and record all of you at once-which is a bad idea. To do a full live band recording with drums miced, would really take at least 12 mic input channels or more, and a fast PC.

I would just do a basic low quality recording of the band live (entire band with with 3 or 4 mics) mixed down to a one stereo channel. Use that track as a reference, and then have the drummer lay down his track first, and so forth.

I use the Mixcraft3 SW and the Alexis Firewire mixer and have some examples on my profile using it. This provides good quality at a pretty low price, not studio though.

Having the mixer vs just a recording unit, is nice because you can use it for your live sound with a PA.