#1
How many of you guys at UG can fluently read standard notation? I noticed that almost everybody I know (8/10) that plays an instrument cannot read standard notation at all. The others can but choose not to.
#2
i know where the notes are, but i dont think i learn a piece of music from sheet music.
well maybe, but it'd be damn slow.

i've be like... ok so thats a G...
and that little line means hammer on.... i think....?

...and thats a b....

and then i'd just end up looking for a tab instead
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#3
i used to be really good at it but i slowly got sucked into tablature. not that its bad i just wish i could still read standard notation. well fast enough to ever really play something.
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#4
I can read treble, bass, alto, and tenor cleff.

It'd probably take me a second to transcribe it to guitar, but I can do it.
#5
Yep.
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#6
I can play melody right of the sheet if it's not to fast or complex, and doesn't have to many instances of several notes being played instantaneously. I prefer tabs with musical notation though. Tabs are more intuitive to me, but I need the note values for the rhythm.
#7
I happen to be doing a lot of it recently as I'm going through Jazz material and
there's no option. But, tabs are really a more direct translation from the paper to
your instrument (I mean the kind of rhythm notated tab that you'd find in a book).

Standard notation is a direct representation for something like the piano. One
note = one spot on the keyboard. But, guitar is more ambiguous, especially if
you're interested in exactly how someone played something.

Neither one tells you why those notes are getting used. So, from a theory
perspective it doesn't matter.

But, standard IS the common written language of music, so its good to know it. It's
not that hard, but it definitely takes more work than tabs.
#8
Quote by FoolOnThePlanet
I can read treble, bass, alto, and tenor cleff.

It'd probably take me a second to transcribe it to guitar, but I can do it.


Now you just have to get used to mezzo soprano and soprano

But yes, I can read sheet music. Both clefs with many instruments.
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#9
Quote by FoolOnThePlanet
I can read treble, bass, alto, and tenor cleff.

It'd probably take me a second to transcribe it to guitar, but I can do it.

Same. I only write things out on sheet music when I'm doing something with Theory. I still somewhat practice proper part writing in both 3 and 4 part textures when I'm bored to freshen my memory. Comes in hand when writing piano lines.
#10
Quote by dervishguitar
How many of you guys at UG can fluently read standard notation? I noticed that almost everybody I know (8/10) that plays an instrument cannot read standard notation at all. The others can but choose not to.


I hope everyone you know that plays an instrument plays guitar

But yeah, I can read reasonably well... anything other than treble/bass takes me a little while, though.
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#11
*Raises hand*

i can sight read treble easily, and ive been taking classical lessons so i've become able to sight read more than one note at once now

bass clef...i can read it, but havent had much experience with it
same goes for alto
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#12
I think notation is a heck of alot better than tab. When you are learning tab you are not really learning what notes you are playing but you are learning a direct position to place your finger. With notation you have to learn what notes you are playing. In notation there are many places you can play the note and this gives you more options and actually gets you learning the fretboard alot better. In general tab doesnt come with note values but I know its out there, the problem with this is it limits what you play to just guitar music. I f you learn to read notation you are opening up the possibilty to play music for any instrument and also to be able to play with other musicians. It is also alot easier to see how music flows together and how it is connected with notation. The myth here is that its hard and I dont believe it is, it just takes practice. I have tried to learn from tab but always find myself stuck in a rut. I am not anti tab, I just believe notation is much superior and will get you to your goals faster.
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#13
I used to play trumpet, so I can read it, but when I try and read guitar standard.... tears ensue.
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#14
Quote by dervishguitar
How many of you guys at UG can fluently read standard notation? I noticed that almost everybody I know (8/10) that plays an instrument cannot read standard notation at all. The others can but choose not to.


What? I hope all your friends are drummers, bassists or guitar players, because standard notation is completely necessary for every other pitches instrument.

And yes, I can.
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#15
me , I started off playing keyboard so when i moved onto gutiar learned notation straight away, then i learned tab, can read off both pretty fluently.
#16
A question for you that are fluent in reading sheet music (I can read it a little, but I struggle):

Can you play a piece first time from sight assuming it is well in your technical range?

Also, how do you remember to include sharps and flats during a piece because theres no accidentals to remind you?
#17
Quote by duggyrocks
A question for you that are fluent in reading sheet music (I can read it a little, but I struggle):

Can you play a piece first time from sight assuming it is well in your technical range?

Also, how do you remember to include sharps and flats during a piece because theres no accidentals to remind you?


Practise. Sight reading is a challenge for me. I'm a piano player mainly (can't read music very well for guitar, but I read for bass) and I can sight read simple counterpoint melodies without much harmony or complex tuplets.

Remembering the key signature is easy. It's repeated at each line to remind you, but I never forget. I just tell myself which key it's in before I play and the right notes come naturally.
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#18
Standard notation is no problem. I find tabulature much more difficult to read, and the lack of note values is annoying. Then again, I've been reading standard notation for 20+ years as opposed to only a year and a half of exposure to tabulature.


Quote by duggyrocks
A question for you that are fluent in reading sheet music (I can read it a little, but I struggle):

Can you play a piece first time from sight assuming it is well in your technical range?

Also, how do you remember to include sharps and flats during a piece because theres no accidentals to remind you?


Depends on the instrument. I can sing something in choir that I've never seen before, plunk (yes, plunk is the right word) something on the piano or play it on the flute, but playing a piece on the guitar for the first time is still a challenge. Then again, it is my newest instrument.

After a while, it becomes automatic to remember the sharps and flats that are in the key signature. It's something that comes with practice.
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Last edited by queenofthenight at Nov 9, 2007,
#19
I can read treble and bass easily.

Alto and tenor not so easily but thats because Ive never encountered it for guitar music. I studied it at a basic level for the music theory Ive been learning for ages.

I love my music theory.
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#20
I can read fairly easily for bass, and my treble skills are gettign better as I write stuff for my little jazz group and try and play melodies from a real book, but it's not the greatest. Give me a few seconds I can work out what's going on, but nowhere near sight reading standard.
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#23
Yep, I can read treble cleff, been awhile though... it'd probably take me a bit to read it fluently again :S
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#24
To some people getting confused when I say instruments, most of my friends do play guitar or bass or drums. I have three friends that play other instruments and play by ear. Eg, if you showed them a B on sheet music, they couldn't tell you that it was a B.
#25
I could always read decently, and I could handle rythms well. When I was in college though, I majored in music and I had lessons on piano to help my reading and I'm pretty fluent with it. I was also on the drumline so I got used to reading an insane amount of notes within a single measure :| it really helped with sight reading strange rythms.
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#27
Another question- I see alot of classical muscians need sheet music infrot of them while performing. Is this because they can't remember the whole score? Bands like Dream Theater have pretty complicated instrumedlys (sp?) and they don't use the score.
#28
can read both, prefer to have sheet music and tab though
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#29
I can read both tab and sheet music, though I prefer sheet music, because the lack of having a value for the notes gets me very angry, especially when a student comes to me with a tab and says, "hey teach me to play this" and I have no idea how the song goes
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#30
Quote by duggyrocks
Another question- I see alot of classical muscians need sheet music infrot of them while performing. Is this because they can't remember the whole score? Bands like Dream Theater have pretty complicated instrumedlys (sp?) and they don't use the score.


I'm sure it's just a reminder and also to know what everyone else is doing.
Plus, just think of all the different pieces they need to perform depending on
the current season/concert/venue. I think it would be impossible to completely
memorize everything out of the vast classical repetoire.