#1
can someone please explain altered chords? I read that they can have a b9, #9, b5 or/and a #5.

if on a chord sheet i just see the chord labelled simply as 'alt', do i assume its one of those? or all of them?
does it mean i can/should use the 'altered scale' over the top of it?

i havent practised the altered scale yet but i want to understand the context of when it should be used.

thanks!
i need to get a better signature.
#2
an alt chord has all of those alterations but you don't actually have to play all of them to get the sound across. You can play any chord from the melodic minor it comes from. (The harmony is interchangeable)

altered scale (dim/wholetone, superlocrian, whatever you call it) is a fine choice but you don't have to. Atered scale for example is similar to the half-whole diminished and to the wholetone scale if you wanted to be a bit more outside.


But the thing to remember is that melodic minor harmony is interchangeable.
#3
Quote by Nick_
You can play any chord from the melodic minor it comes from. (The harmony is interchangeable)

Atered scale for example is similar to the half-whole diminished and to the wholetone scale if you wanted to be a bit more outside.


sorry to be a pest. thanks for the reply.

what do u mean by the 'melodic minor it comes from'?
i need to get a better signature.
#4
The altered scale is a mode of the melodic minor.
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#5
If you see a Galt chord while you comp you can feel free to play Ab-∆7, Db7#11 etc - anything from Ab melodic minor. The harmony is the same


Specifically, with alt chords playing the _7 or a _9 a tritone above plays a very rich upper structure that sounds very nice if you have a bassist and/or piano laying down the fundamental harmony and motion.