#1
I saw a guy demoing a classical guitar on a shopping channel last week, It sounded awesome and for £60 I couldn't go wrong. after waiting all week it arrived yesterday.

I'm pretty happy with just I've got a few quick questions. I know that some people say about learning on an acoustic because you have to press the strings in further, so it strengthens your fingers. yet when I've played on acoustics before its not been this hard to fret notes, it was way out of tune when I got it, but that wasn't much of an issue as I've got a tuner that was easily fixed I was just wondering though as it was out of tune could the the action be a little out as well?


Since it came I've just been playing acoustic stuff, but I was just wondering if someone could suggest some classical stuff to look into


Thanks in avanced people
#2
Well, for £60 and off a shoping channel, it's certainly possible but, i wouldn't vastly worry aslong as you can fret the strings and it holds the tuning for a decent amount of time.
#4
classical guitars have nylon strings which are far easier to press down than STEEL strings on most acoustics.
#5
The tuning holds up pretty well as far as I can tell.......I've only had it just over 24 hours, but it seems stable.

I know the strings are supposed to be nylon on a classical guitar but these seem like a combo of steel for the E, A and D strings and then nylon for the G, B, and e string......... on the DVD that came with it it said about not using steel strings as it would put the neck under too much tension and cause it to snap. My dad isn't musically minded at all but he seems to think that the top strings are just plain nylon and that the bottom strings have been wound like steel strings.

The neck is about twice as wide as my electrics, but I can still play it, it just seems to me that action is higher than it should be so you really have to bare into the strings to keep them down to fret notes.
#6
As far as I know, the low E, A and D nylon strings have a steel core and nylon outer.
Let me tell you about heartache and the loss of god
Wandering, wandering in hopeless night
Out here in the perimeter there are no stars

Out here we is stoned
Immaculate.
#7
The 3 Bass strings aren't steel core, they're fine nylon strands that are wrapped with metal wire - usually bronze. They are the proper strings for a classical guitar.
Classical strings are made with no end ball or eyelets and must be tied onto the back of the bridge.

Never put steel strings on a classical guitar, the tops are not braced for the tension and I have seen guitars that had their bridges and tops buckled upwards as much as 3/4 inch - thus totally ruined.

I hope this helps.
#8
Quote by DR_SH


The neck is about twice as wide as my electrics, but I can still play it, it just seems to me that action is higher than it should be so you really have to bare into the strings to keep them down to fret notes.


It could be that the action is too high. I have suggested to friends who wanted to buy a first guitar that they get a classical because the nylon strings are easier on the fingers for a beginner. They tend to not get discouraged as fast due to sore fingertips.

If your guitar is hard to fret have it at least looked at by someone who knows guitars or by a local store guitar tech. It could also be that the truss rod in the neck needs some adjusting. There are a lot of good articles that deal with action on the internet. They may be of some help.

I have a Taylor 110-E that when I got it I could barely stand playing it for 15 minutes. I had to lower the saddle height and adjust the truss rod and now it feels like silk and I can play it for hours. The action on your classical should be easier, in my opinion.
#9
Quote by OldFingerpicker
The 3 Bass strings aren't steel core, they're fine nylon strands that are wrapped with metal wire - usually bronze. They are the proper strings for a classical guitar.
Classical strings are made with no end ball or eyelets and must be tied onto the back of the bridge.

Never put steel strings on a classical guitar, the tops are not braced for the tension and I have seen guitars that had their bridges and tops buckled upwards as much as 3/4 inch - thus totally ruined.

I hope this helps.


Absolutely right.

It's like comparing a solid steel ball to a polystyrene ball rapped in tin foil.


Do not under any circumstances put steel strings on. You'll kill your guitar.
#10
Quote by OldFingerpicker
The 3 Bass strings aren't steel core, they're fine nylon strands that are wrapped with metal wire - usually bronze..


Ah, decent explaination
Let me tell you about heartache and the loss of god
Wandering, wandering in hopeless night
Out here in the perimeter there are no stars

Out here we is stoned
Immaculate.