#1
Is there pedal or something that will only overdrive the highs so that playing normally isnt distorted, but when I hit a harmonic it kinda squeals?
Ex/ Billy Sheehan (But I dont want his tone )

Thank you!
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Last edited by bassmanjoe08 at Nov 10, 2007,
#2
NO NO NO!!! And may I state that this is the BIGGEST travesty EVER. EVER! I simply cannot believe that someone didn't have the presence of mind to add a low-pass filter to a distortion pedal. They simply DO NOT EXIST. I actually emailed Digitech suggesting it - that would be a great X-series feature where you control the crossover. Bastards!

The only way you can replicate that is with a stereo rig. Then, only run your effects through the top cab. That's it. No other way. Bull****, isn't it?

Many pedals have a blend feature, so you mix your clean with the distortion, but that's not even close to the same effect. You can tell that 2 signals are playing.

Billy Sheehan does it with 2 separate outputs for the pickups - mudbucker to a clean amp, and Precision to a dirty one. There's some overlapping, but since it's two different pickups it has a different sound. The low-pass filter Entwistle situation is only possible via stereo rig.

That's why I want one.

For shame!

Fitz
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#3
^ Yeah, it's quite amazing how it's already 2007 (almost 2008), and they don't have something as simple as that, but we have terabyte hard drives for computers
#4
Well, if you have a guitar amp lying around and a crossover in your amp, putting a stereo rig wouldn't be that hard actually.
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#5
Damn.

But fitz, did you tell the folks at Digitech who you were? Maybe that would smarten them up.
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#6
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Damn.

But fitz, did you tell the folks at Digitech who you were? Maybe that would smarten them up.

haha

Yeah, and they thanked me for my comments. I also told them to rerelease the bloody Bass Whammy after seeing it sell for $750.
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I was looking at a used Warwick Vampyre LTD 5'er for about $200. I went home to grab my wallet and came back and some jerk with an epic beard got it already..
#7
Quote by thefitz
NO NO NO!!! And may I state that this is the BIGGEST travesty EVER. EVER! I simply cannot believe that someone didn't have the presence of mind to add a low-pass filter to a distortion pedal. They simply DO NOT EXIST. I actually emailed Digitech suggesting it - that would be a great X-series feature where you control the crossover. Bastards!


A low-pass filter is an extremely simple mod, you can do it yourself if you want one. I did one on my muff to get rid of high frequency distortion. Just put it right before the output of a pedal, after distortion.

Here's a schematic and a calculator so you can figure out what frequencies you're cutting:

http://www.muzique.com/schem/filter.htm

I recommend modeling the cutoff with a graphic EQ so you know what it will sound like before you do the mod. Add a bypass switch too, and if you want to make the filter variable just use a variable resistor.

But yeah, it is such a shame that no one adds in such a simple feature, especially when getting rid of distorted highs can make the sound so much more smooth.

I assume the reason most companies don't include a low-pass filter in their pedals is because it will effectively rob your bass of part of it's sound, though this can be a good thing. Alot of pedals do have some form of treble reduction though, be it in the EQ or built into the circuit.

Why would you need a stereo rig for a low-pass filter btw?

Or do you mean that you want clean lows and distorted highs? That's not a low pass filter, that would need a crossover. In that case, that's alot harder to do; it would involve a crossover in the pedal. In that case you'd probably have to have a digital distortion pedal, and that would be crap.

The reason people wouldn't have crossovers in pedals is a good one IMO, it's complicated, it will raise the price heaps, and it will be less reliable. Probably take alot of power and make the pedal alot bigger too. And no one wants a digital distortion pedal, would sound gross...
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#8
Surely you could split the signal in the pedal? And have one going straight out of the pedal, and the other with a lowpass filter on it which then goes through the distortion circuitry?
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#9
^ Splitting the signal is what would be complicated, that's what would not really be worth it in a pedal. Like I said before, I don't think you can do that in an analogue pedal, so you would need to go digital which would be crap.

And a low-pass filter will cut your highs, so what you suggested would be mixing a dry signal with a distorted signal with it's highs cut.

I think what the thread starter wants is clean lows and distorted highs, that's not practical in a distortion pedal and will probably never be achieved without a stereo rig of some sort.
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#10
Oh. I meant a high-pass filter.

Yeah, that's what I was suggesting. Mixing a wet signal with a dry signal, which is what most people do anyway? Just with different amps.

Why couldn't you do it on an analogue pedal?
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#11
Quote by Nutter_101
Oh. I meant a high-pass filter.

Yeah, that's what I was suggesting. Mixing a wet signal with a dry signal, which is what most people do anyway? Just with different amps.

Why couldn't you do it on an analogue pedal?


You try designing a cicuit to do that. It isn't easy at all.
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#12
^ AFIK you can't have a good crossover in an analogue pedal. I'm not 100% on this, I'm sure someone like JohnSwift or powerfreak would be able to say for certain. Either way I've never seen a small crossover for bass. All the hi-fi ones I've seen have been the size of a small stompbox, they fit fin in speaker boxes but not in a pedal.

Now that I think about it, it would be possible to have an analogue crossover in a distortion pedal, but the pedal would be big and possibly need mains power. Also you could maybe have a dry signal to one amp, then for your distorted signal digitally remove lows and send that into a distortion circuit. But this is all complicated and impractical. If it was simple to do I'm sure loads of boutique pedal builders would do it, I mean, it's not like we're the first people to think of it.

Most crossovers for bass are either rackmout or in amps, they have big complex circuits and need more power than a 9v battery would supply.

EDIT: post was directed at nutter, not the one directly above me.
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Last edited by TGM at Nov 10, 2007,
#13
I should just state that I'm not talking about splitting the signal at all.

What I mean is doubling the signal, so you have one with the lows cut going to the distortion, and one with the highs cut not being distorted.
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#14
^ That's not hard then. Splitting the signal is the complicated thing.

You could send a dry signal to a clean amp, then a signal with the highs cut to a clean amp, but this would still require a two amp setup. Whether it would sound good in the real world is another thing though.
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#15
Quote by TGM
^ That's not hard then. Splitting the signal is the complicated thing.

You could send a dry signal to a clean amp, then a signal with the highs cut to a clean amp, but this would still require a two amp setup. Whether it would sound good in the real world is another thing though.


Quite a few bassists do that. Use two amps and send a wet signal to one and a dry to the other and mess around with that. It seems to sound pretty good.
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#16
^ Yeah I know lots of people do that, but I don't know of many that use a low-pass filter with distortion, that's what might sound bad in the real world. It may sound like fuzz and harsh hissing/grating over your dry signal. Then again, if done right it might sound good.

Either way, I don't think there's a simple solution that you would build into a stompbox.
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#17
Quote by TGM
^ Yeah I know lots of people do that, but I don't know of many that use a low-pass filter with distortion, that's what might sound bad in the real world. It may sound like fuzz and harsh hissing/grating over your dry signal. Then again, if done right it might sound good.

Either way, I don't think there's a simple solution that you would build into a stompbox.


Yeah, I see what you mean.

Maybe someday though... Someday....
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