#1
heya. i know how to form melodic minor scales, but i can never really see me using them in a bassline/part. unless i was doing some kindof bass solo. but is it really important to be fluent in the melodic minor scale, as a bass player?

thanks
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#2
Its best to know as many scales as you can.
The melodic minor isn't hugely important, but its still good to know.
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#3
Melodic minor is a much more melodic thing. For making bass lines its not particularly important, but it gives you another place to go in terms of scales to add to the sounds you can get.
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#5
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
A more useful tool would be the jazz minor in my eyes. This is just the melodic minor up and down.


in what context would a jazz minor scale be used?
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#8
Quote by slap-a-bass
use melodic minor for classical music...so unless you're doing a bass solo in a classical piece dont suggest to use ti that much

I really hope you're joking
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#9
Quote by slap-a-bass
use melodic minor for classical music...so unless you're doing a bass solo in a classical piece dont suggest to use ti that much


Classical music used and still usewd damn near every scale under the Sun. Major, minors, modes all those wacky scales from Eastern Europe, completely chromatic (see: serialism).

And melodic minor simply flows more easily than harmonic minor. Just play around with the scale and you can get some great runs up and down the scale.
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+1
#10
Quote by sinan90
Melodic minor is a much more melodic thing. For making bass lines its not particularly important, but it gives you another place to go in terms of scales to add to the sounds you can get.


lol wouldnt be called melodic minor if it sounded ****e would it :P

but he's right, only use it if you want to be extremely melodic with a piece or if its classical music too

its good to know as many scales as possible anyway, opens up more oppurtunites during improvisation
Last edited by bikersbasin at Nov 10, 2007,
#11
Quote by bikersbasin
lol wouldnt be called melodic minor if it sounded ****e would it :P

but he's right, only use it if you want to be extremely melodic with a piece or if its classical music too

its good to know as many scales as possible anyway, opens up more oppurtunites during improvisation



That was a typo, I was thinking classical but typed melodic.
You can use melodic minor pretty much everywhere you'd normally use harmonic minor jsut beware of the natural in melodic minor instead of teh nb6 in harmonic minor.
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[22:08:23] <Confusius> I wish I was a bassist
[22:08:26] <Confusius> you fuckers look cool


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#12
Quote by gm jack
Classical music used and still usewd damn near every scale under the Sun. Major, minors, modes all those wacky scales from Eastern Europe, completely chromatic (see: serialism).

And melodic minor simply flows more easily than harmonic minor. Just play around with the scale and you can get some great runs up and down the scale.


?? on school we learned that Classical Music only used major and minor scales and stuff like lydian etc. With kinda is major and minor.

They started with using other scales like eastern etc. Around 1875!

At least... that is in my schoolbook. And I had a test about that this week...
#13
I think it could be useful. I just try learn as many scales as i can. makes your music more colorful
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#14
Quote by sidious
?? on school we learned that Classical Music only used major and minor scales and stuff like lydian etc. With kinda is major and minor.

They started with using other scales like eastern etc. Around 1875!

At least... that is in my schoolbook. And I had a test about that this week...


you need to get a new schoolbook. SERIOUSLY.

the major and minor scales are pretty much the basis of almost all western popular music. the modes, e.g. lydian, are used a lot in jazz, but also in other popular genres (but not so much). the different forms of minor are used too. my original question was how melodic minor would be used as a bass player.
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#15
Simple, for more counterpoint bass lines (second melodies). It simply sounds smoother than the natural minor scale when ascending, and is the natural minordecending, if I rember right.
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#16
Quote by MATTTHEMOP
you need to get a new schoolbook. SERIOUSLY.

the major and minor scales are pretty much the basis of almost all western popular music. the modes, e.g. lydian, are used a lot in jazz, but also in other popular genres (but not so much). the different forms of minor are used too. my original question was how melodic minor would be used as a bass player.


I said the modes didn't I?

I ment those wacky eastern scales weren't used...
#17
Quote by sidious
I said the modes didn't I?

I ment those wacky eastern scales weren't used...


They were used. Not very often,but you do come accross them.
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#19
Quote by FbSa
Just putting this out there, Melodic= 1, 2, 3b, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. Right, or am I off in some fairy land?


you're half way there. that is the scale ascending. when descending, play the natural minor, so the 6th and 7th are flattened by a semitone.
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#21
Every scale is useful to know in some way.

But honestly, Harmonic Minor>>>>>Melodic Minor, IMO.
The.
#22
Quote by MATTTHEMOP
you're half way there. that is the scale ascending. when descending, play the natural minor, so the 6th and 7th are flattened by a semitone.

It is quite often used as a scale on it's own in jazz and fusion so the natural minor is not always used to descend, more often that not though, it is used.
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#24
The major 6th and 7th in the melodic minor usually don't lend themselves well to rock music. It can still be a useful scale in modern music though.
Nightmare Before Christmas comes to mind:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=zUvJ_mGJnRw
I did a Music Theory analysis of this song and it's in melodic minor. It's also a lot more complicated than it sounds. Danny Elfman knows what he's doing.

Edit: Sorry forgot something. The parts of this song that use the raised 6th and 7th of the melodic minor scale are descending but it's still melodic minor in song context, regardless of whether you are ascending or descending.
Also, if you're into rock music, use the mixolydian mode instead of major. It's like the major scale but the 7th is lowered one half step.
And to clear up something earlier in the thread, the modes were used in churches before major and minor were invented. The modes are also often used by modern composers. John Patitucci is a good example of a bassist that knows and uses the modes to compose. You hear the mixolydian mode every day in rock music. Jazz music also extensively uses the modes, especially mixolydian and dorian

To sum it up for anyone who cares:
- Mixolydian can be thought of as the major scale with a minor seventh
- Dorian can be thought of as the minor scale with a major 6th

yeah I'm a music nerd
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Last edited by DoctrDrew116 at Nov 11, 2007,
#25
Quote by DoctrDrew116
The major 6th and 7th in the melodic minor usually don't lend themselves well to rock music. It can still be a useful scale in modern music though.
Nightmare Before Christmas comes to mind:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=zUvJ_mGJnRw
I did a Music Theory analysis of this song and it's in melodic minor. It's also a lot more complicated than it sounds. Danny Elfman knows what he's doing.


Oh god, that's good times. In band in 8th grade we played a piece by Bartok, so we called him Bartok the Barbarian, then there was The love, the life, the loser, Danny Elfman. We actually made a game were you can play as Bartok the Barbarian, and of course his mortal enemy D'Vorak. Good good times.

Anywho, I use the melodic minor scale sparingly, but I have used it in a song we call the explosion, it has a nice dark sound to it if you drop the major 7th. But I cut it out in the remake and just use the Minor scale, including the flat 6+7.
#26
Quote by DoctrDrew116

Sorry forgot something. The parts of this song that use the raised 6th and 7th of the melodic minor scale are descending but it's still melodic minor in song context, regardless of whether you are ascending or descending.
Also, if you're into rock music, use the mixolydian mode instead of major. It's like the major scale but the 7th is lowered one half step.
And to clear up something earlier in the thread, the modes were used in churches before major and minor were invented. The modes are also often used by modern composers. John Patitucci is a good example of a bassist that knows and uses the modes to compose. You hear the mixolydian mode every day in rock music. Jazz music also extensively uses the modes, especially mixolydian and dorian

To sum it up for anyone who cares:
- Mixolydian can be thought of as the major scale with a minor seventh
- Dorian can be thought of as the minor scale with a major 6th

yeah I'm a music nerd


That seems kind of restricting. If you're playing any kind of music you can play any scale. Music is more about rhythm and phrasing than note choice. And yes, churches were using modes, and for whatever reason western composers said, hey I like Ionian, and Aeolian. Let's take those two and make them the major and minor scales, and use them all the time.
#27
Oh sorry if I sounded restricting. That was meant as a suggestion, not a rule. Music is far too complicated to have rules anyway.
"They're not rules, they're more like guidelines."
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#29
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
I thought that was probably what you meant but I wanted to make sure it was understood by the TS, and anyone else reading in. *high five*


i guess i understand that. playing jazz is relatively new terrain for me, and the last thing i want to do is sound awful and mess up the whole ensemble.
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