#1
if im lowering the action by adjusting the truss rod on an ibanez pf-5ce which way should i turn the allen wrench to lower the action?
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Fender Ash Lite Stratocaster
Ibanez ac70 acoustic
Ovation Celebrity
Fender Blues Jr
planet waves tuner-ts9dx tubescreamer-metal muff-boss ce-5-delta labs dd1 delay
#3
well how can i lower the action? and what type of neck curvature is optimum?
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Fender Ash Lite Stratocaster
Ibanez ac70 acoustic
Ovation Celebrity
Fender Blues Jr
planet waves tuner-ts9dx tubescreamer-metal muff-boss ce-5-delta labs dd1 delay
#4
Go on the Taylor website. They have a bunch of PDF's on pretty much everything, including a few on truss rods and neck curvature.
Id go find the specific articles but my cable has slowed to dialup and loading PDF's is a bitch.

I stuffed up my dexcription, im not going to explain it again and my internet is back up tos peed, so here is the articel form Taylor on truss rods:
http://www.taylorguitars.com/global/pdfs/truss_rod_adjustment.pdf

And you change your action usually by filing down the saddle (corrected, i mixed that up)

Oh, and you should probably take it to a pro to do either of these if you care about your guitar. They will do it properly, whereas its easy not to do it right if youve never done it before, if you stuff up your saddle, its cheap but annoying to go buy a new one. If you stuff up your truss rod, it can mean goodbye guitar, i mean you might be fine, but you should at least talk directly to a luthier or guitar tech about how to do it and all before you try

EDIT: Yeah i mixed up a couple of things. Apologies for that. All fixed now
Last edited by johnos at Nov 11, 2007,
#6
Quote by Blaster Bob
The truss rod is for adjusting neck curvature, not action.

I don't think anyone has ever said this any better.

I expected a bunch of "don't touch your truss rod unless you know what you're doing" posts.
But Bob, you summed it all up pretty well..
All my kudos go to you tonight.
Proud Owner of a 2006 Taylor 814 CE-Fall Limited Edition


Quote by MiasmA
guys, i got it. pucture = the rare breed of green fruits that tend to laugh scoffingly and then question a statement. AKA lolwut pears

CASE CLOSED..
#7
Quote by crystalh
I don't think anyone has ever said this any better.

I expected a bunch of "don't touch your truss rod unless you know what you're doing" posts.
But Bob, you summed it all up pretty well..
All my kudos go to you tonight.


Eh? Of course you shouldn't touch your truss rod if you don't know what you're doing. And adjusting the truss can lower the action is the neck is bowed.
#8
^ Its that last thing that should be touched, and the average guitar player should not be touching it.

Gear:
Partscaster/Tele into a bunch of pedals, a Maz 18 head, and a Z Best cab.
#9
Here we go again...The truss rod does not adjust the action, lowering the bridge saddle does that. I'll say it, leave the truss rod alone, take it to a pro if it needs adjusting. Truss rods break easy and that costs more than a lot of guitars are worth unless you have a high end Martin...It would probably cost more than your Ibanez cost new.

f i remeber correctly the neck should have a slight outwards (curving awy from you if your holding the guitar)


That's backward. The neck should bow slightly away from the strings in the middle, not away from the player. That would make the strings buzz in the middle and you would need to adjust the truss rod again...Please do some research before you give more people faulty information. Frets

Also, the action is not usually set by filing or sanding the nut, it's done at the saddle. If the action needs to be adjusted on an acoustic you pull the saddle and sand the bottom, lightly. Try it and sand a bit more if necessary. Unless playing open chords is buzzing or pulling strings out of tune, the nut should not need to be tinkered with. Setting string height a the nut requires tiny and expensive nut files, (usually over $100 a set) and is definitely an advanced project. In addition to the fact that a very small amount of filing goes a long way, the nut slots require a slight angle downward toward the tuners or the strings will buzz in the nut. If you use the wrong file and get the slots too wide, the only cure is nut replacement.

Thread starter:

If you're comfortable with it, remove the strings then pull the bridge saddle, that's the thin white piece the strings actually sit on. Lay your sandpaper on a flat surface and move the saddle on it lightly with sanpaper around 200 grit or so, it won't take much. Try to keep the bottom flat, it's not too hard to take more off one end than the other. Until you've done it a few times you won't realize just how little is needed to make a big difference. If you have some calipers and know how to use them it's a very good idea to check the saddle height and don't sand more than .005 or so at a time, then check it. It's a slow, tedious process but it beats sanding off way too much and having to completely start over with a new saddle. Shims can be used, but they tend to inhibit the ability of the saddle to transfer vibrations to the guitar body so you lose a bit of sound quality and sustain. It's not very noticable, but I avoid shims if possible.

If you're unsure of your ability, take it to a pro. If you want to learn, a new saddle shouldn't cost more than $10 US tops, ($6 or so for me locally) for a good bone one, so it's not an incredibly expensive project to learn on. You might even want to keep your existing saddle and go with a new one just to tinker and learn with. That way you learn a bit about setting your own action and maintaining your guitar, and you still have the untouched original saddle you can simply drop back in if you trash the replacement. I would want a good bone saddle anyway, the factory saddle is probably plastic. Anyway, setting up your own guitar is something you certainly should learn to do, acoustic or electric, and if it costs you a new saddle that's not very expensive and shouldn't do any major damage to the guitar itself.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#10
Quote by roamingbard13
^ Its that last thing that should be touched, and the average guitar player should not be touching it.


I know, that's why I put you shouldn't touch it. I also know tht it's the last thing you touch.

But if the neck is bowed then no matter what you do to the saddle and nut etc the action will be uneven and high. In this case you HAVE to make a truss rod adjustment. And when I say 'you' I mean a guitar shop.
#11
That's backward. The neck should bow slightly away from the strings in the middle, not away from the player. That would make the strings buzz in the middle and you would need to adjust the truss rod again...Please do some research before you give more people faulty information. Frets


My bad, i mucked up my explaining, sorry, i had it right in my head, just it went down wrong on paper.

Here is the document that i was referring too as well
http://www.taylorguitars.com/global/pdfs/truss_rod_adjustment.pdf