#1
I've recently just discovered how to get that good beefy Metallica tone on my amp, yay! I looked into my settings some more and realized it had something to do with "scooping the mids" or taking the mid frequency out of your sound. Some don't like it or say its for n00bs and others are in favor of it, so I guess its a matter of personal preference.

So I was wondering, since taking the mid frequency or "fullness" out of your sound gets you that more crunchy tone for playing metal, wouldn't buying a guitar with a shallower, less rich tone (lower quality wood?) give an even better tone for playing music from bands such as Judas Priest or Metallica?

I could give this a try on some of my father's other guitars, he has two hollow-bodies and a solid body fender copy that has been made out of some rather in-expensive wood.
Gear:
- G&L Tribute Series Legacy Guitar
- Behringer V-tone GM108 15-watt amp
Last edited by ScruffMcGruff at Nov 10, 2007,
#3
It posted previously before I typed the whole thing down, I didn't notice until I posted the this completed thread, the old one is deleted now.
Gear:
- G&L Tribute Series Legacy Guitar
- Behringer V-tone GM108 15-watt amp
#4
Hmm...interesting theory...
Quote by HuckIt
I met this chick I really liked and wanted to practice sex, so I practiced on some guy I met at a gas station...
#6
The amp plays more of a part of creating your tone than your guitar. Plug a cheapo guitar into a good tube amp and it'll sound good.

The presence of the midrange is much less on the guitar, but more on the eq controls of the amp. So using a crappy guitar imo, is negligable in getting you the "scooped mids" tone for metal.

Btw, try that scooped mids setting in a band situation and you'll see why a lot of guitarists hate it. You dont have to scoop mids to sound heavy.
Peavey 5150, LTD EX400BD, tubescreamer, and a whole lotta fingers
#7
Quote by ~Andrea-Angel~
The amp plays more of a part of creating your tone than your guitar. Plug a cheapo guitar into a good tube amp and it'll sound good.

The presence of the midrange is much less on the guitar, but more on the eq controls of the amp. So using a crappy guitar imo, is negligable in getting you the "scooped mids" tone for metal.

Btw, try that scooped mids setting in a band situation and you'll see why a lot of guitarists hate it. You dont have to scoop mids to sound heavy.


Thanks for clarifying, I started to fiddle around with the EQ a bit more and realized how lacking in sound quality my amp really is... I guess it's time to look for a tube amp of some kind, cause every time I play, I fiddle with everything, my guitar knobs, pedal, and amp, all to no avail of getting the sound I want. *sigh* 15-watts simply just doesn't have the oomph I need anymore, I want bigger punch!
Gear:
- G&L Tribute Series Legacy Guitar
- Behringer V-tone GM108 15-watt amp
#8
i find that scooping can sound decent with the volume really low, but when i play loud my mids are WAY up
Originally posted by primusfan
When you crank up the gain to 10 and switch to the lead channel, it actually sounds like you are unjustifiably bombing an innocent foreign land.


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#9
+10000000 to whoever mentioned live situations.

Scooped tones sound good on Metallica's albums because James would double and triple track his rhythym parts, and Kirk would layer them in as well. When they play live, they use a lot more mids so they cut through better.
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