#1
I've been playing for a while now and I've recently realised that one of the things holding me back is that I can't look at a note on the fretboard and instantly know what it is.

Sure, I can work out any note on the fretboard fairly quickly used my own brand of the CAGED system, but that's *not* the same as just knowing the notes. I have that kind of instant knowledge of the 6th (and 1st) string(s), but don't possess it for any of the others. Any advice on learning the rest?

Does anyone have any lessons, books, programs, etc that teach what I'm talking about -- specifically something that forces you to stop trying to work the note out and teaches you the notes themselves?

[For those of you who might wonder why this would be a big deal at all... Well, when someone asks me to play something using the E Phrygian Dominant scale, I'd like to be able to be thinking in terms of notes instead of having to rely on a thousand and one scale patterns that I'd need to learn in advance. Simply put, learning your fretboard is musical freedom.]
#2
The first lesson in most bass books are simple excercises on learning the fretboard. I'm assuming it's the same for guitar books, so try looking at one of those.
#5
well i kinda cheat, i know the 6th 5th and 4th string, and from there i just use octaves to find my note
ex.
-5---------
-----------
-3---------
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#6
I am assuming you know what the notes are and how they relate (half step, whole step, sharp, flat, natural)...if you dont know that let me know and i will explain it

the way i did it was...i made a chart of a fretboard and then i just started playing a fret, checking the chart,verbally saying the name of the note. and move one...i did one string each week...start on the dotted frets and then work in the others, after you have done each string for a week do all six together for a week and if you dont have it by then well you had better come back here for more help

other handy tips to remember that will help

open=e,a,d,g,b,e

5=a,d,g,b#,e,a

12=e,a,d,g,b,e
use these as landmarks
you can also use frets 3,7, and 9 as fret board land marks

if you know one string then you know the one above it (towards the ceiling) from the 5th fret (or 4th on the g string) down.

if you know one string then you know the string below it (towards the floor) from the 7th fret (8th on the b string) down.
( the notes are actually an octave higher but that doesnt really matter for naming)

All notes between fret 12 and 24 are identical to the notes between 0 and 12 (just add 12 to the fret number) (but one ctave higher) ie fret 5 on the E string is A and fret 17 on the E string is also A

if you learn all the natural notes (with the exception of b-c and e-f) you can find all the sharps and flats by going one note above or below
(this works the other way around too)


that may be confusing...let me know if you dont get any of it
#7
Quote by Kurt-Corgan
Fretboard Warrior.

EDIT: It's a free program that shows you a fretboard and you name the notes. Found here: http://www.francoisbrisson.com/fretboardwarrior/fretboardwarrior.html


Already got it. I've no problems getting every answer right and answering fairly quickly, but again, I'm working out the note in relation to other notes. It's not instant in the way I know 8th fret on the 6th string is C.

It doesn't specifically help you eliminate the crutch of working out notes, which is what I want. Thanks anyway though.

Quote by thexsunrosered
yeah man, i have that same exact problem. its really annoying sometimes >.<


Yep, very. My playing would be a thousand times better if I could just get over this hurdle.

Quote by Rockon914
well i kinda cheat, i know the 6th 5th and 4th string, and from there i just use octaves to find my note
ex.
-5---------
-----------
-3---------


Yeah, I mentioned that I already know how to work notes out. I can work out any random note in about 2.5 seconds according to Fretboard Warrior. That's not my problem. I'm looking to overcome working notes out.
#8
Quote by mr. cool
the way i did it was...i made a chart of a fretboard and then i just started playing a fret, checking the chart,verbally saying the name of the note. and move one...i did one string each week...start on the dotted frets and then work in the others, after you have done each string for a week do all six together for a week and if you dont have it by then well you had better come back here for more help


Eh, I guess it'll be something along these lines. Just hope I can get over the mental block/crutch I've got used to.
#9
To remember the notes i think its helpful to do it while applying them. Like learn a scale and the notes in it, then find the notes on the fretboard in the scale and while you hit each note say the note that is in the scale, hope that might help.
#10
Hmm... Sounds like something that could actually work. Simple but effective.

I was thinking about expanding on your idea. Instead of playing through a scale and speaking the notes, I'd select one note to focus on each day (or every few days)... whenever I played something which included the note, whether in a chord or a lick, I'd speak that note aloud.

Hopefully that sort of thing will hammer the note in for good.

Anyway, cheers.

Any other suggestions would be welcome.
#11
Learn the notes by string, using the dots as reference. A string 3rd fret:C, 5th fret=D, 7th fret=E, 9th fret=F#, etc.

Then start learning the notes vertically by fret number. Also, use key concepts like the octaves in power chords to help you quickly reference different notes.

Good luck with it!
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#12
get absolute fretboard trainer. you have to buy it, if you're a law abiding citizen of the internet that is
#14
I find that just playing on it for a while will help. Learn each box formation of the scale, and then practice improvising over it, making use of each box. This way, you develop a very practical knowledge of the fretboard.

Works for me.
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#15
Play three note per string scales and while picking the note say it. It helps me a lot
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#16
Try playing an extended maj penatonic scales all over the fretboard. You will learn where the notes are and the mystery of the B string will become clear.
#17
It's piss easy. here....

1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, A
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of intervals along the open string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note!

Trying to learn them all at once is incredibly daunting, but if you can break it down and at spend a little time working out the notes an gradually building on your previous knowledge you'll have it down in no time.
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#19
I just take the base eBGDAE and apply it in my memory to not-only the top, but to the 12th fret. That way, when I get to the 10th, 11th, 13th, etc frets, I think in terms of fret 12. From that point, I just use certain notes enough to where I can make out nearby notes based on that note. It takes some thinking rather than memorization, but it's nearly as fast.
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#20
every time you play guitar, think of the note name in your head before you play it. don't let yourself play anything without knowing what notes you're hitting.

frustrating at first but it works.