#1
e|--------------------------------------|
B|--------------------------------------|
G|--------------------------------------|
D|---------4-----------------------5---|
A|-------------------------------5------|
E|-0h1/2----2--2-5-2--2-3----------|
* *
e|------------------------------------------|
B|------------------------------------------|
G|------------------------------------------|
D|---------4-------------------------------|
A|----------------------------3p2---------|
E|-0h1/2----2--2-5-2--2-------5p2----|

e|--------------------------------------|
B|--------------------------------------|
G|--------------------------------------|
D|----------4-----------------------5--|
A|-------------------------------5------|
E|-0h1/2-----2--2-5-2--2-3---------|
* *
e|-------------------------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------------------------|
G|---------------------5p4---------6p5---------|
D|----------4-----------------7p4--------8p5--|
A|-------------------------------------------------|
E|-0h1/2-----2--2------------------------------|


It is the one for the last 5 soloes of Hangar 18. Ok first of all how would you describe this as a chord progression to solo over? Is is like F#-G-F#-?-F#-G-F#-? or something like that? Second of all how would you solo over this when the first chord (F#) is not even in the key of D minor? And lastly how do Dave Mustaine and Marty Friedman trade off soloes with this single chord progression and still make it sound good even though for one it is out of key, two it is more like a riff than a chord progression, and three their styles are so different?
Last edited by Schecter10 at Nov 10, 2007,
#2
your thinking way too much about it. just because F# isnt in d minor, doesnt mean you cant use an F#. composers have been doing that sort of thing for a very long time. just because something is "out of key" doesn't mean it will sound bad. think of how boring a song would get if it strictly used the notes of a given key. that doesn't allow for much freedom. i personally dont know how dave and marty go about writing solos but it really isnt all that difficult. they probably have a general idea of what scale(s) they want to use and just go from there. then they prob. improv. til they find something they like.
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#3
Yea I know you can go out of key (and are supposed to), but the first chord in a chord progression out of key seemed going a bit far but idk
#4
dont think so much. just play the song like the tabs say. if you listen to it enough, you'll realize what notes sound good and what dont
#5
Quote by fadetowhite
dont think so much. just play the song like the tabs say. if you listen to it enough, you'll realize what notes sound good and what dont


+1, very well put
#6
I think it was BBking who said who gets to say what is right or wrong. Its music play it how it feels good.
#7
It's not a chord progression though, it's just a single note riff; the same rules do not really apply. Just solo in the key of the song and ignore the accidentals.
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