#1
Also if i then know what key im in- can I play any combinations of notes that are in that key/scale?

As in if the chord progression was:

Em G B Am F -what notes of the Em scale should be played to support the Am and Em?
#2
hey always have thought the same thing, but i just usually play myself like Em in e-scale
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#3
The easiest way to determine the key that you are in is to look at the last chord of the song. The root note of the last chord of a sonic is almost always the tonic of the key that the song is in.

You cannot play any combination of notes that are in that key scale because it would also have to make sense with the chords underneath. For instance, if you are in the key of C and the chords you are playing over are C F G E B C, you should not play a B over the C chord, an E over the F chord, an F over the E chord, or a C over the B chord. The reason for this is because it would create to much dissonance and would therefore sound bad.

The easiest way to see if something is wrong is to look at the chords that you are playing over and make sure that you are not playing any notes that would create a lot of dissonance. The strongest intervals for dissonance are M/m 2, the M/m 7, and the P4. If you are unsure about whether there is dissonance or not, just play through the section slowly and see how each note sounds.
#4
Quote by dough boy
Also if i then know what key im in- can I play any combinations of notes that are in that key/scale?

As in if the chord progression was:

Em G B Am F -what notes of the Em scale should be played to support the Am and Em?


You can do whatever you want. That's why music is an art, there are no rules. There is theory behind the music though, and sticking to notes of the Em scale will make your music sound content and the notes will 'fit.' Don't think that this is a way to easily make music; just using the tonic note major scale to create melodies around a set of chords. Your sound will get boring, fast.

^ The guy above me says that dissonance is bad. That can't be more wrong. Would you want to read a story of watch a movie that didn't have any conflict in it? That would be like watching the teletubbies skip across a grassy plain. It's just boring.
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Last edited by Muphin at Nov 11, 2007,
#5
Memorize your key signatures and relative minors, and then look at the notes you're playing. Let's do that now.

Em:
E G B

G
G B D

B
B D# F#

Am
A C E

F
F A C

That leaves us with E F F# G A B C D D# E

The e natural minor scale is E F# G A B C D E. So, since there are quite a few notes outside that scale in what you're playing, you can either A. just play those notes and follow the chords or B. change the B to B Minor and the F to F# diminished and play the E natural minor scale.