#1
So I write the guitar riffs and lyrics to a song, I want my band to learn it, I have to teach the other guitarist his part, the drummer needs to make up a beat, and the singer needs to learn the flow and timing of the song. How do I go about presenting this efficiently cause at band practice we try to do it all at once and we end up just playing an old sold that we covered cause it goes bad. Thanks.
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#2
Play the riff you made for them and read them the lyrics. Tell the singer how you want to go. Sing it, even if you can't sing. Then show the rythm guitar player his part. Tell him the notes and give him tabs for it that you wrote out, which you need to do. Then either let the drummer think up something, or tell him kind of what you want from him. If you are all capable musicians, it shouldn't be a problem.
#3
I use GuitarPro.

Barring that, you could just, um, record yourself playing the riffs in sequence, and go over it with the rest of the band. Give a copy for the drummer to listen to, so he can make up a beat before the next practice; give one to the other guitar player and one to the bass player, so they can learn their bits; and while it's important for the singer to match the "flow" of the song, give him enough leeway to make the vocals his own.

Last edited by Freunleven at Nov 11, 2007,
#4
I just start playing my songs and have everyone else come in when they figure out what i am doing and eventually it morphs into a song. Then we remember it next practice i guess.
A band of my very own:

Pyknic
#5
Usually one of us writes the lyrics. Then we compose a song to fit the mood of the lyrics, after we have the main melodies done, we start constructing verses, choruses, bridge, ect. Then we make slight changes to the lyrics (to fit the rhythm of the song better). My band's songwriting process usually consists of writing the lyrics first. Although one of our best songs came from a single guitar riff when the lead guitarist was just messing around, we made a whole song around it, then lyrics.
#6
my band usually just jams out a riff until it becomes a song .......its only works to good effect 6 out of 10 times tho. we've always viewed lyrics as secondary tho
The One You Call Daddy
#7
Please tell me that you don't write every song for the band....other than that...

Work with the other guitarist and bassist by themselves. Once they get their stuff down, the three of you can go to the drummer and make it into a song. Then introduce it to the singer and give him the lyrics and show him how you want them to be sung.
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#8
Quote by brokenanthem
Please tell me that you don't write every song for the band....other than that...

some of the greatest bands worked that way...

I mail them
#9
Guitar Pro + E Mail. Simple as that. But it the end, it seems that nobody learned their part and I have to use the "Show Me How" method...
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#10
Record the demo, and give it to the guys to learn. Simple. We got 20 full worked out orginals, we did them all pretty much that way. If one of us writes a song we just record demos.
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#11
i dont normally come up with anything in guitar for my band cuz i play bass but when i do write something i just play it and let my guitarist morph it to whatever sounds good. while we jam on parts we think should be like say a verse our drummer just jams along until we find something we like
#13
for the band im in, i jam it out with the drumemr until it becomes a full good song, wchich would usually take aroudn 2 weeks, adding bits in, etc. and then i would show the singer somehow, and then bassist.
#14
Quote by Ice15
we've always viewed lyrics as secondary tho


Same with the bands I'm in. In my main band, sometimes our lyrics just don't really make any sense, which was originally started as a joke because everybody said they had no idea what the singer was saying (fair comment, as he wasn't that good at the time. He is now ), but now we just don't care because we think music is more important and place more emphasis on the melodic and rhythmic aspects of vocals than their meaning.

In that band, its fairly open: either me (guitar, bass, backing vocals) or the lead singer (/keyboards) comes up with an idea for either most of a song or an entire song. Thankfully, everybody (those mentioned + drummer/keyboardist and guitarist/bassist/keyboardist) is great at picking up/working out songs, so we jam around the ideas for a while and think of new parts/arrangements/who should play what instrument (we rotate a fair bit).

In my other band, which is your general power trio, its pretty much the same; either me or the drummer comes with most of a song and the 3 of us sit around, all with acoustics, and think of new parts/changes, and then I write the lyrics by myself when we've got the instrumental parts down.
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#15
i generally reocrd some backing drums with a ****ty casio keyboard then record 2 guitar parts that i write

i then give the band this quick demo, teach the other guitarist his parts, then play it while the drummer figures out what hes doing. After the guitars and drums are more or less done we add bass an vocals as we go, working on lyrics as we do it, and then finally backing vocals. If anyone has any ideas we then try to work them in, like maybe a pause or a tempo change or something
#16
Usually, I think of a guitar riff, or my rythm guitarist thinks of one. Myself and the rythm guitarist jam on it, until we both have parts to play for the main riff. Then the Bassist and the Drummer follow our lead, and write thier parts. We then structure the song, and finally we work on lyrics. Usually we work on lyrics last, because its mostly about the music for us.
DARK_MATTER, Instrumental Post-Metal from Ireland


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#17
Quote by roast
Usually, I think of a guitar riff, or my rythm guitarist thinks of one. Myself and the rythm guitarist jam on it, until we both have parts to play for the main riff. Then the Bassist and the Drummer follow our lead, and write thier parts. We then structure the song, and finally we work on lyrics. Usually we work on lyrics last, because its mostly about the music for us.


I wish my band was like that... We always write songs around lyrics and I don't think they're as good as if we wrote the lyrics around the music.
#18
Quote by roast
Usually, I think of a guitar riff, or my rythm guitarist thinks of one. Myself and the rythm guitarist jam on it, until we both have parts to play for the main riff. Then the Bassist and the Drummer follow our lead, and write thier parts. We then structure the song, and finally we work on lyrics. Usually we work on lyrics last, because its mostly about the music for us.


Yea, I agree. This is what my band does. Its most efficient for us
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#20
If what I've got's just a few riffs or whatever, I play it to the other guitarist and we develop it together then take it from there. If it's a proper song I normally play it through to the whole band solo, and snap at anyone if they try to join in while I'm playing it (that really annoys me!)
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