#1
I need to learn about trombones.
what different kinds of trombone are there (similar to tenor, alto, baritone saxophones)

what is standard?

does anyone have a link i can read myself so nobody has to explain everything in a wall of text?

thanks
WOO
#4
Quote by CollinPlaysBass
Tenor Alto and Bass are the main ones i think. Tenor is the main. Also there is the super bone. It has a slide and valves.

Oh and try wikipeida. It has everything, IN THE WORLD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

hahaha....it actually does
#5
Quote by hrdcorelaxplaya
all I know about them is that they're in the Bass Clef, which is a pain in the ass to read.



...what makes the bass clef more difficult to read than any other clef?
#6
Ah yes, the trombone. A fine instrument. I used to play one myself, but lately of just been letting it slide.
#8
Standard trombone is in the key of C, there are Soprano trombones, and i'm sure other ones floating around, but unless you're a band teacher or trombone virtuoso, you're rare to come across others in your life
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#9
All you need to know about the trombone:

1. Don't ever remove the slide and try to shove the greased bit up your ass.
2. Yeah, don't ever do that.


...true story.
#10
Quote by Trivium!
...what makes the bass clef more difficult to read than any other clef?

bass cleff
doesnt read the same as treble
bass cleff
you have to take the notes and drop them two steps down
its weird
but i play tuba
and saxaphone
plus guitar
so its not that bad for me
#11
Quote by Trivium!
...what makes the bass clef more difficult to read than any other clef?

because the treble clef is cooler

in all seriousness, it's because I learned recorder, tenor sax, and guitar, all of which are on the treble clef.
#12
Tenor is the main trombone used. It is in bass clef, in concert pitch, and has a range between that of a tuba and a trumpet. More skilled players can reach much higher notes, more in the range like a trumpet, and pedal tones can be used to reach pitches as low as most tubas, although the tone quality isn't that good. Bass trombone is also commonly used, normally one or two per four tenor trombones in band and jazz band settings. It technically has the same range as a tenor trombone, but larger mouthpieces and the use of two triggers allow easy playing in tuba range. Alto trombone is very uncommon. Tenor trombone requires the same embouchure as playing a euphonium/baritone, and the positions are the same (although you use slide positions instead of valve positions.) The slide is extended to lower the pitch of the current partial you are in (partials are the various notes you hit by changing your embouchure), and although there are more accepted slide positions for various notes, many slide positions may be used to produce the same note. The trombone is cylindrical bore and thus has a brighter brass tone (much like that of a trumpet, but unlike a euphonium or french horn). Beginner trombones cost from $150-$400, and are usually small bore (less tone) and have no trigger/F-attachment (an attachment that allows you to play longer positions without having to extend your arm as much.) Hope that covered the basic information, I can answer some more specific questions.
#13
The three main ones are tenor, tenor with f-attachment (basically has the same range, but a there are notes in-between that you can't hit without the f-attachment) and bass. They're usually pitched in B-flat for school concert band or jazz, and are written in concert pitch in the bass clef, unlike most high brass and saxophones.
EDIT: ^Daymn, beat me to it.
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#14
Quote by hrdcorelaxplaya
all I know about them is that they're in the Bass Clef, which is a pain in the ass to read.


+1 I get lost reading that stuff, I guess because I'm more used to treble clef.