#6
Unless you use some hella abrasive dishwashing soap, I don't see how it could hurt the cymbals if they're securely in place.

...Doesn't mean you should do it though. It just sounds like a crap idea.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


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#12
cymbal cleaner?
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#15
wow it took you that long to come to the conclusion to clean cymbals with cymbal cleaner...
#16
Quote by aaron6890
my cymbals for my drum set are really dirty so i got the idea of putting them in the dishwasher, would this hurt the cymbals or the dishwasher? has anyone done this? please help.

Not a great idea. Water and heat accelerate the oxidation process. You'll remove the grime, but are likely to have the cymbals looking "old".

If you choose to do this, you might be well off to add some soapy ammonia in the dishwasher. Ammonia will remove oxides on copper and brass through a process called "reduction".

Also check to make CERTAIN the dishwashing detergent does not contain any chlorine compounds.

Copper or Brass + Cholrine = Green. I seriously doubt you want green cymbals!

Also, the heating element in the dishwasher might get the temperature high enough to affect the brass. Probably not a good idea to use the drying cycle. Just remove them immediately after the wash and rinse. Then towel dry.

The best advice I could offer would be to try this first on your least favourite cymbal. If there are problems, you haven't lost that much. If it works well, continue with the rest. In either case, give us the results.


Cheers,
SYK
Meadows
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#18
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
Not a great idea. Water and heat accelerate the oxidation process. You'll remove the grime, but are likely to have the cymbals looking "old".

If you choose to do this, you might be well off to add some soapy ammonia in the dishwasher. Ammonia will remove oxides on copper and brass through a process called "reduction".

Also check to make CERTAIN the dishwashing detergent does not contain any chlorine compounds.

Copper or Brass + Cholrine = Green. I seriously doubt you want green cymbals!

Also, the heating element in the dishwasher might get the temperature high enough to affect the brass. Probably not a good idea to use the drying cycle. Just remove them immediately after the wash and rinse. Then towel dry.

The best advice I could offer would be to try this first on your least favourite cymbal. If there are problems, you haven't lost that much. If it works well, continue with the rest. In either case, give us the results.


Cheers,
SYK

ok you win im totally not going to do it now thanks
#19
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
Copper or Brass + Cholrine = Green. I seriously doubt you want green cymbals!

I kinda want green cymbals.

I wonder if it effects the tone in a negative fashion...
#21
Quote by imicius
I kinda want green cymbals.

I wonder if it effects the tone in a negative fashion...
I'm certain it will. I can't say it won't be in a good or bad way, though. The texture of the surface has a lot to do with the way the highest overtones are coupled to the air. Clean shiny cymbals sound "brighter". Grimy or dull cymbals sound a bit "warmer and darker".

You'll end up with some odd growth on a microscopic level when the copper-chloride compounds are formed.

If you want to see what this will look like, just put a shiny penny into a container of bleach. It won't take long for it to become hazy and mottled looking. It won't be pretty, but if that's what you're looking for, it won't be hard to achieve. You'll probably do better to dilute the bleach and let the reaction occur more slowly. That way you'll have a better chance to rinse it off when the desired amount of funkiness occurs.


... and to SteveHouse, SYK doesn't know chemistry. Just bits and pieces related to things I've work with before. I wish I had taken chemistry in HS and college.
Meadows
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#23
Quote by ARCtrooper225
Ironically, some people bury their cymbals in dirt because they think it gets them a better sound...


very true. it sucks when you buy a really awesome ride and then forget where you buried it though.
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#25
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew

... and to SteveHouse, SYK doesn't know chemistry. Just bits and pieces related to things I've work with before. I wish I had taken chemistry in HS and college.

Hm.

Well, SYK knows cymbal cleaning chemistry?

I took AP chem my senior year, and all I can remember about reduction is that it's the opposite of oxidation... Just cause you've had it doesn't mean you get it.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
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#26
i never clean my cymbals and i have high end paistes and istanbuls. i have a 3 yr old a custom and its as shimmery as the day it was born.
#27
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
I'm certain it will. I can't say it won't be in a good or bad way, though. The texture of the surface has a lot to do with the way the highest overtones are coupled to the air. Clean shiny cymbals sound "brighter". Grimy or dull cymbals sound a bit "warmer and darker".

You'll end up with some odd growth on a microscopic level when the copper-chloride compounds are formed.

If you want to see what this will look like, just put a shiny penny into a container of bleach. It won't take long for it to become hazy and mottled looking. It won't be pretty, but if that's what you're looking for, it won't be hard to achieve. You'll probably do better to dilute the bleach and let the reaction occur more slowly. That way you'll have a better chance to rinse it off when the desired amount of funkiness occurs.


... and to SteveHouse, SYK doesn't know chemistry. Just bits and pieces related to things I've work with before. I wish I had taken chemistry in HS and college.



I'm taking Chem II in college right now, and we thoroughly covered redox reactions. At least the math is easy...
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This is the funniest thing i've ever read on UG.
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#28
yeah, some nice cymbal cleaner works great.
but cymbal cleaner is basically jsut water and ammonia.

and the dishwasher i would not use any detergent, and with jsut water it wouldnt do anything