#1
Well, UG, I'm finally officially in a band, we just had our first rehersal this afternoon. It's myself playing lead guitar, a pretty good bassist, a sick drummer, and a rhythm guitarist (we're looking for vocalists, but I'm filling in on lead vocals for now). We're classic rock/ metal/ general hard rock. There's one problem: the rhythm guitarist pretty much sucks. He knows nothing about theory, can't really solo whatsoever, and has trouble picking things up. For example, myself and the bassist already knew The Trooper today, but the rhythm guitarist and the drummer didn't. The drummer picked it up fine, but I had to try to teach the rhythm player the 1st harmony part for the intro for about 10 minutes, until we eventually pretty much said **** it and we played it without him. Same thing happened with Woman, by Wolfmother, and Orion (okay, so I don't blame him for not being able to pick up Orion quickly).

So, I know we could find a better guitarist if we tried, and I actually already know of one guy who's about as good as myself, so we could trade off solos and such. Unfortunately, the rhythm guitarist and the bassist are the guys who brought the band together, he recruited the drummer and the bassist recruited me.

My question is: How long should I wait until suggesting we get a new guitarist to the bassist and drummer?
#2
Quote by hrdcorelaxplaya
Well, UG, I'm finally officially in a band, we just had our first rehersal this afternoon. It's myself playing lead guitar, a pretty good bassist, a sick drummer, and a rhythm guitarist (we're looking for vocalists, but I'm filling in on lead vocals for now). We're classic rock/ metal/ general hard rock. There's one problem: the rhythm guitarist pretty much sucks. He knows nothing about theory, can't really solo whatsoever, and has trouble picking things up. For example, myself and the bassist already knew The Trooper today, but the rhythm guitarist and the drummer didn't. The drummer picked it up fine, but I had to try to teach the rhythm player the 1st harmony part for the intro for about 10 minutes, until we eventually pretty much said **** it and we played it without him. Same thing happened with Woman, by Wolfmother, and Orion (okay, so I don't blame him for not being able to pick up Orion quickly).

So, I know we could find a better guitarist if we tried, and I actually already know of one guy who's about as good as myself, so we could trade off solos and such. Unfortunately, the rhythm guitarist and the bassist are the guys who brought the band together, he recruited the drummer and the bassist recruited me.

My question is: How long should I wait until suggesting we get a new guitarist to the bassist and drummer?



Just pointing that out. Wait a couple more practices and talk to him. Its a tough situation you're in though. Just get on him about being serious if you're going to be a serious band.
#3
well if its the first day, maybe you should give it time. I mean you can't expect everybody to know how to play with each other the first day.
#4
you cant expect a guy to learn a song on the spot, everyone learns their own way and at their own pace. You should discuss the songs you guys want to play at an earlier time so you guys can all come prepared
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#5
Tell him to practice more, I started my band my bassist couldn't play for sh*t. But I kept a hold of him for a few months, I no longer have to tell him what to play and he's improved dramatically (He went from playing Can't Stop to YYZ and the bass solo from Metrolpolis Pt.1)

Just wait it out, after 3 months if see absolutly no improvement, talk to him.
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#6
Dang, He couldn't play Woman? Can he even play a chord?
I have the same problem, I'm a lead guitarist with a pretty good bassist, a great vocalist, the drummer's improving at a very fast rate but the rhythm guitarist can't seem to get going.

I say if you rhythm guitarist doesn't make a conscious improve or practice hard with a little while give him the boot.
#7
Quote by xero1123
Just pointing that out. Wait a couple more practices and talk to him. Its a tough situation you're in though. Just get on him about being serious if you're going to be a serious band.

okay, good point. I guess ideally he woudn't be a rhythm guitarist as much as a 2nd lead (I'm a pretty big Iron Maiden fan), but whatever.

And I think we have the potential to be playing some small gigs within a few months if we can find a vocalist and a better guitarist, I really think he'll be holding us back in the long run. I mean, we worked on 4 songs today, and he played a grand total of one (Paranoid, and only the power chords).
#8
Well, to be fair, you don't necessarily have to have a knowledge of theory to be a good guitarist.

However, it really helps.

Maybe try teaching him some stuff before just ousting him from the band.
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#9
The band I used to be in was in the same situation. I was the drummer. The lead guitarist and bassist wanted to kick out the rhythm guitar player but they didn't want to tell him. A few days later he heard about it and quit. About a month later he turned out to be one awesome guitar player. So I say wait a while, don't make the mistake our band made.
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#10
Quote by hrdcorelaxplaya
I mean, we worked on 4 songs today, and he played a grand total of one (Paranoid, and only the power chords).


No way, that's like the only song my rhythm guitarist can play.
#12
Quote by Metallica rulz
Trooper harmony is so easy though.... if he can't play that then I suggest getting a new rhythm guitarist. In fact The whole rhythm guitar is easy, if you dont want to kick him out, then you should just give him some lessons.

Rhythm definitely isn't as easy as you say, man. Rhythm takes alot of... rhythm?
#14
Quote by Metallica rulz
Sorry I meant the Whole rhythm guitar in Trooper is easy. I should have used a damn comma.

Damn english and it's stupid ass grammatical errors xD
Last edited by hotboxtheglobe at Nov 12, 2007,
#15
You can't really make decisions like this after one rehearsal. Do you guys have prior experience playing in bands and whatnot? Its going to really be dependent on how much this guy contributes to your band. I say keep an eye (or ear) on things for a little bit, and make your decisions from there. If your band is still in the early stages, making major changes should be a lot smoother. Things get a lot more complicated once you start dealing with established acts, who are not looking to make major change anymore.
#16
Don't jump kick him out after one practice. He could be nervous and therefore played poorly as a result.
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#17
Quote by hrdcorelaxplaya
He knows nothing about theory, can't really solo whatsoever, and has trouble picking things up.



Rythm Guitarist.... USUALLY dont solo.

haha

Give him some time tell him to practice the songs your going to be rehearsing BEFORE you get there preferably a week before, that way he has time to actually LEARN what you are going to be playing.

And what the other guys said, tell him to get a bit more serious

Dont take this as me being a **** im just trying to help

Cheers

GG
#18
Quote by Guitar_Gangster
Rythm Guitarist.... USUALLY dont solo.

haha

Give him some time tell him to practice the songs your going to be rehearsing BEFORE you get there preferably a week before, that way he has time to actually LEARN what you are going to be playing.

And what the other guys said, tell him to get a bit more serious

Dont take this as me being a **** im just trying to help

Cheers

GG


Yeah, give him a list of songs that you want to play at the next practice, and give him like a week to learn them. Sometimes it's hard for some people to pick up on things quickly so give him a chance. However, if too much time goes by and he's not learning the songs or putting an effort in then I would say look, this isn't gonna work, ect. and just remove him from the band until he has had lessons or something
#19
sure, I wouldn't have expected him to have learned the entire rhythm part for the trooper, but he couldn't even get the first ****ing lick, this one:

|---------------------------------------------------------|
|---------------------------------------------------------|
|---------------------------------------------------------|
|--(5)--5--5-4-----4--4--4-2-0---2--2--2-0-----4-5-4--5---|
|----------------7--------------------------3-------------|
|---------------------------------------------------------|

and we've told everyone what to work on for next time, but frankly, I'm not optimistic. Sure, I'm not talking about kicking him out after one practice, but I'm just wondering how soon we should start thinking about it.
#20
look.... your not listning to what anything any of us say

again and again your just ranting.

Stop ranting and either listen to what we say, OR...

rant somwhere else.

please

thanks.
#21
Like most people have said, decide which songs to do before hand so you can practice outside of band, and give him a few months and see how he's doing.
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#22
he couldn't play woman?! maybe he needs to hear the songs before playing them, like, the real thing. that would make it easier for him.

wait a little while, see how it goes. he might improve if you teach him.

plus, are solos that important for a rhythm guitarist?
#24
Did you ever think that maybe, just maybe, you have horrible teaching skills?

Just because he couldn't pick up the Trooper in 10 minutes doesn't mean he sucks. Hell, I couldn't pick up the Trooper in 10 minutes either, especially if I had never heard the song before. Give the kid a break.
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#26
There's nothing wrong with not being able to solo. I'm my bands rhythm guitarist and I can't solo for crap! He probably just has a different learning technique that you. Give him time, he'll either start to pick things up or he'll contiously suck. Hell, if he's bad enough, the bassist will probably realize this and agree to kick him out.

I agree with the song list. I'm the band leader, so I've created a list of songs that we play during pracitce so everyone can keep up with our next song. Try making a list of all the songs you guys want to play and then just work your way down it
#27
Basically your not hear to ask whether or not to kick him out your here to reassure urself that its the rite thing to do.
#29
Umm since it's the first practice you shouldn't expect him to have so much stuff down and just learn things on the spot. Plus rhythm guitarists generally don't solo.
Maybe you should tell him what songs your band is going to rehearse so that he can practice more in advance. Everyone learns at their own pace.
Be more patient, don't expect everybody to be perfect.
#30
Quote by hrdcorelaxplaya
Well, UG, I'm finally officially in a band, we just had our first rehersal this afternoon. It's myself playing lead guitar, a pretty good bassist, a sick drummer, and a rhythm guitarist (we're looking for vocalists, but I'm filling in on lead vocals for now). We're classic rock/ metal/ general hard rock. There's one problem: the rhythm guitarist pretty much sucks. He knows nothing about theory, can't really solo whatsoever, and has trouble picking things up. For example, myself and the bassist already knew The Trooper today, but the rhythm guitarist and the drummer didn't. The drummer picked it up fine, but I had to try to teach the rhythm player the 1st harmony part for the intro for about 10 minutes, until we eventually pretty much said **** it and we played it without him. Same thing happened with Woman, by Wolfmother, and Orion (okay, so I don't blame him for not being able to pick up Orion quickly).

So, I know we could find a better guitarist if we tried, and I actually already know of one guy who's about as good as myself, so we could trade off solos and such. Unfortunately, the rhythm guitarist and the bassist are the guys who brought the band together, he recruited the drummer and the bassist recruited me.

My question is: How long should I wait until suggesting we get a new guitarist to the bassist and drummer?


Jesus stop complaining. I have to teach my bass player almost every song on ta setlist, everytime we play anything
watever, Nevermind
#31
Dude, give him time. It's the first freakin' practice and you already want to kick him out? Give him a chance. You're the lead guitarist, work with him. The thing is, you shouldn't only devote band practice to making him better. Let's face it, band practice is what it means: a band practice, not a "get the rhythym guitarist better" practice. What I would do is devote three days out of the week, and spend a half hour to an hour on those 3 days working with him. You can teach him some riffs, how to read theory, chords, and many other things, ultimately making him a better guitar player. That way, when band practice rolls around again, he'll be at the level he should be at.

If after all of this, he STILL sucks AND doesn't seem to want to put any effort in, THEN kick him out.
#32
Y'know, us more experienced musicians have a name for this inexperienced rhythm guitarist, it's called a 'blank page'
You, me and every other decent musician knows how hard it is to find a musician that clicks with your particular style perfectly.
If he's an OK guy in himself, be mates with him, spend a lot of time on building up a genuine friendship with him, all the while showing him everything you know. A couple of years down the line, you'll have gained a friend, collegue, and musician whose style of playing will compliment yours perfectly, because you mentored him.
See the situation as an opportunity.
If one of the first things you do when you join someone elses band is to discuss how to get rid of one of the original members, you're just going to get a bad name for yourself.
#34
look. If u just had ur first rehersal, how can u expect to jut go ahead and kick him out? I've had some trouble learning some songs too, but the more u practice together, the better all of u r gonna get. Are u just playing cover songs? I mean, its alot easier to play the songs u wrote than somebody else. do some improv and let him write his own stuff. Just give it some time. Most of the time theese kinda kinks work themselves out
#35
Quote by FireTag
you say it's his and the bassist's band?! then leave. You'd have to be a real ass to kick someone out of the band they formed.



I agree.


If you don't like someone, or even anyone in the band, then get the F*ck out.


Actually, with your attitude.....why don't you just become a "1 man show"...you already sound like one, and hey, you don't have to deal with others sucking...


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#36
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Y'know, us more experienced musicians have a name for this inexperienced rhythm guitarist, it's called a 'blank page'
You, me and every other decent musician knows how hard it is to find a musician that clicks with your particular style perfectly.
If he's an OK guy in himself, be mates with him, spend a lot of time on building up a genuine friendship with him, all the while showing him everything you know. A couple of years down the line, you'll have gained a friend, collegue, and musician whose style of playing will compliment yours perfectly, because you mentored him.
See the situation as an opportunity.
If one of the first things you do when you join someone elses band is to discuss how to get rid of one of the original members, you're just going to get a bad name for yourself.


That's actually a perfect way to say it.

I was in the same situation a couple years ago. My friend just picked up a guitar, wasnt very good, but I helped him out, and introduced him to new music. His playing style now complememnts mine really well, and I can actually work with him. And I've gained a close friend.
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