#1
Metal, Rock, Jazz, Blues, Pop...

Just with a couple of sentences for each one... say how you play music different according to the genre.... just curious how people respond...
#2
For metal, I play with a metal kind of vibe; rock is more rocky; jazz gets a bit jazzy; blues is usually very bluesy; and God help me if I end up playing pop.
#3
Metal: make sure you hit the Low E or A string with downstrokes between your phrases. Most popular scale is the locrian scale because it has alot of dissonance.

Rock: Power chords (as well with metal too) and the minor/major pentatonic scale are HEAVILY used. some of the rock legends of the day don't know any other scales besides those... but it's REALLY useful to know more then those.

Jazz: (My Favorite ) learn the modes of the Major scale. It's heavily music theory based. the song structure is "AABA" 9 times out of 10. after it plays the "AABA" part called the "Head"... then the individual members of the band improvise... creating their OWN version of how they think the song should sound. sometimes lasting from 3-12 minutes long with improv. alone. Modes are used alot in Jazz

Blues: Learn the blues scale. I'd like to talk more about this genre because it's really fun and all, but im really bad at it. just practice the 12-bar Blues and try and incorperate the notes of the chord into the music. Blues says "F**K YOU MUSIC THEORY" and throws the diatonic progression out the window. so theres almost no rules for blues.

Pop: when your playing on stage.... jump off the edge. Hopefully if you're smart you'll place the stage at the edge of a cliff and you'll end up where you should be
Quote by vikramkr
I am trying to shred using power chords
#4
Metal: I don't really play metal, but I'd just crank it up with lots of didtortion and tune down my low strings, maybe all of them, I guess...

Jazz: Another genre I don't play much of. I've played maybe 1 jazz song in my guitar career. I should look into more of this...

Blues: My second favorite genre. I play with lots of feeling. Usually improv a bit, using the minor pentatonic and blues scales. Follow common progressions rhythmically, and sometimes I make up my own...

Rock: My favorite genre, seeing as how it's not specified by sub genres...there are so many great rock subgenres, alternative, hard, soft, indie, college, radio, modern, classic, surf, etc.

Pop: Who plays pop these days??
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#5
For the blues scale... is it that one where it is basically the pentatonic with like one note added in in some of the strings?

Also, i heard this: for blues... i play a key... say A major pentatonic... and for blues, I can also play it with the A minor pentatonic?
I tried that and it sounded... weird...
#6
Metal - loud, more technical
Rock - loud, bluesyish
Jazz - when I dunno what I'm doing
Blues - drunk
Pop - dead



      PM if you'd like to collaborate on any rock/hard rock/metal stuff
      #7
      Quote by PuttYoh
      For the blues scale... is it that one where it is basically the pentatonic with like one note added in in some of the strings?

      Also, i heard this: for blues... i play a key... say A major pentatonic... and for blues, I can also play it with the A minor pentatonic?
      I tried that and it sounded... weird...


      Instead of playing A Minor pentatonic... play Gb or F# minor pentatonic. because that's the "Relative minor of the major key". just move it down 3 half-steps

      so Gmaj pentatonic = Emin Pentatonic they both just emphsise different notes which makes it sound minor/major
      Quote by vikramkr
      I am trying to shred using power chords
      #8
      Quote by Wolfbite718
      Instead of playing A Minor pentatonic... play Gb or F# minor pentatonic. because that's the "Relative minor of the major key". just move it down 3 half-steps

      so Gmaj pentatonic = Emin Pentatonic they both just emphsise different notes which makes it sound minor/major


      I thought Gmaj and Emin were exactly the same... =\

      Also... what type of music would these be considered?

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kdlovtN7gZw
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZc0Ln9DTKQ

      and are they considered high gain? or mid?
      #9
      Quote by PuttYoh
      I thought Gmaj and Emin were exactly the same... =\

      Also... what type of music would these be considered?

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kdlovtN7gZw
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZc0Ln9DTKQ

      and are they considered high gain? or mid?


      They share the same exact dot pattern. but the E-minor focuses on the E note as the root and the G-major focuses on the G. and those two notes help define the emotion of the soloing
      Quote by vikramkr
      I am trying to shred using power chords
      #10
      well, pretty much the only difference between any of those is dynamics, i'll explain. you can take something like this

      Em, G, C, D (a very common progression in most music) and depending on HOW you play this it can sound like any of the above

      Metal - crank up the distortion and palm mute the hell outta it. drums and bass should be pounding too

      Rock - throw a little bit of gain on it and play uptempo, at some point it will probably switch from dirty to clean and the drums will lay off and be lowkey at that point.

      Jazz - played probably clean with added 7ths or 9ths (jazz and blues likes 7ths and 9ths) drums will probably have a somewhat swingy beat to them.

      Blues - basically played either clean or with a bit of fuzz, possibly mid to low tempo. bass would outline the chords while the guitar would play licks based around the progression (most likely in the infamous pentatonic or blues scale)

      Pop - most likely played like the rock version but with less oomph and probably far too many other instruments arranged around it. overproduce it to sound like a modern day pop song.
      #13
      Look. I don't know about metal, it just has this feel.

      Rock is hard to define these days, it's mostly powerchods, but that turns it to something...

      Jazz: triplets man, triplets. Weird chords, not so many rules. You focus on the chord of the moment.

      Blues: a lot of out of key playing, a lot of 7ths, and the main thing - crisis between major 3rd and minor 3rd.
      "The end result - the music - is all that counts"
      #14
      ^ im just curious as to how you get lotsa triplets outta jazz? i havent heard that many jazz tunes that had triplets everywhere (i would like to point out that although i have heard a selection of jazz tunes i'm not what you'd call a big jazz buff, i enjoy it but only on occasion)
      #15
      Quote by Arndee
      Metal - loud, more technical
      Rock - loud, bluesyish
      Jazz - when I dunno what I'm doing
      Blues - drunk
      Pop - dead


      :lol: well put
      #16
      this is from a bass player's prespective so bear with me...

      metal: fast, low and loud. depending on the genre, there might be double bass so playing a full measure is a lot easier here. mostly minor with some unison riffs between guitar and bass with some small fills.

      rock: focus more on chord patterns and rhythm here. Eighth notes are common and a steady bass line keeps the song moving. the main riff is often repeated to keep the flow of the song during a solo or bridge.

      jazz: walk it! if you can walk it just keep it mind that quater notes will make it sound like you know what your doing at least. remeber just cuz you guys are doing some musical improv doesn't mean there's no chord progression so use it when walking up and down your bass.

      blues: blues scale all the way. keep a jazzy feel without much of the walking and focusing more on a well placed rhythm with the song. like metal, minor keys are what makes blues, blues!

      pop: ew.
      #17
      Metal - I like the slower, Soundgarden style of metal. Generally I play in drop D and small two-string chords to make riffs of.

      Rock - Knowing the pentatonic scale inside out, and knowing which accidentals is fundamental. I like the genre because you can have chords and lead/riffs and lead/one guitar and it's a wide genre. The use of effects of big here.

      Jazz - I tried to learn it a little a while ago. I learned that playing with arpeggios, rather than scales is a good thing to do, hard though.

      Blues - Aside from the fact that the 12 bar blues is overused way too much, it is a fun genre with lots of emotion. If you want to play the blues you should deninetly practice your bends and vibratos, as you'll be using them extensively.

      Pop - There's not really much to it. Three chords will do for a song.
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