#1
I want teach myself so I can mix my own songs. But when I searched on Amazon all the books looked advanced or not for beginners. So please help! I been struggling with tone and feedback for my whole life and I want to change that!
#4
I own about 50 various books, none of which I'd describe as being beginner books.

The illustrated "Complete Recording Handbook" is about as lo-fi as I've come across, but it's very general and not really beginner orientated.

Still, if you can find a cheap copy, just read it through 10 times.

Even tweaks' guide is quite difficult for a beginner.
#5
Sound Reinforcement put out by Yamaha is interesting, but some of the stuff is pretty advanced. Still a book every engineer... live or studio... needs to have. I'm like BrianApocalypse, I probably have over 60 music books.. everything ranging from Music Engineering to Theory to Business to Songwriting. I believe every musician needs to develop a library.

If I were you, and really interested in the field, I would suggest contacting some audio engineers in your area to see if you can work as an apprentice in exchange for maybe doing some grunt work around the studio. Maybe your high school offers something similiar if it's large. Never hurts to ask. I learned a lot from once just sitting in a room and watching someone work for 3 hours. Just don't be a nuisance
I was once heavily prominent on these forums from 2004-2007, let's see how long I can stay now that I'm back.
#6
I have found both 'The Recording Engineer's Handbook' and 'The Mixing Engineer's Handbook' to be loaded with invaluable advice. I don't know if they're beginner books, but they're not hard to understand, and there's not loads of technical information. There's loads of useful information and advice though, and it's given by top notch recording and mixing engineers. I do sincerely reccommend checking them out. As their titles suggest, the recording handbook is for recording instruments/vocals, and the mixing handbook is for mixing. Apparently there's a mastering engineers handbook by the same guy, but I've heard nothing good about it.
#7
I say the Mixing Engineer's Handbook is good for that task, and a book I just love right now...is the Home Recording For Musicians For Dummies. Badass references.
2005 Epiphone Zakk Wylde Signature Buzzsaw (ZW Set Pickups)
2005 Ibanez RG5EX1
2002 Ibanez RG320DXQM w/ DiMarzio pups
Line 6 Guitarport
Cakewalk SONAR 6 PE
Propellerhead Reason 3.0
#8
Quote by altgrunge
Home Recording For Musicians for Dummies is the best book I ever bought, that and my line 6 UX2 are my best recording things I've ever bought. I highly recommend this book.


+1 to that.

i felt like a dummy going out and buying this book.. ( heh heh..)

but the recordings speak for themselves.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#9
Quote by altgrunge
Home Recording For Musicians for Dummies is the best book I ever bought, that and my line 6 UX2 are my best recording things I've ever bought. I highly recommend this book.


And you know you're a dummy when you're using a Line 6 UX2 to record.

I think you should just keep doing what you're doing. Experience is the best teacher when it comes to recording and producing. There is some theory behind it, but most of it is knowing how your equipment works and what it does, and that information is available for free on the internet.
Quote by Godzilla1969
I love you, Muphin. You have great taste in music.

Quote by Pacifica112J
Muphin > You

The Cooperation
#10
look into a book called Mixing With Your Mind.

Mixing is hard work and kinda hurts my brain.
MBOX2 - PRO TOOLS LE 7.3.1 - CUBASE SX3 - REASON 4
ATTACK_DECAY_SUSTAIN_RELEASE_