#1
hey guys i hav been playing guitar for a while now and i am pretty good at playing rythem but i really want to improve on my lead playing so could someone please tell me specific stuff i can work on
#3
pentatonic scales would be great. Picking technique (alternate/economy picking) is also really important.
A wise man is not wise because of his wiseness, but because of his manness.

Quote by floppypick
Penis.. do digimon have them?
#4
practice.
pentatonics.
practice.
modes.
practice.
study solos.
practice.
gear?
coming soon... parker fly mojo flame
ibanezes: rg350dx frankenstein * rg7620 7-string
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line 6: pod xt live * ax2 212
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#7
Build legato first. Three note per string legato licks are a great place to start and will get your fretting hand used to playing leads. Your picking hand will catch up over time.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#8
It'd be good to practice your picking and fretting hand at the same time, so they improve on the same level, rather than assuming your pick hand will catch up. That'll happen, it'll just be slower than if you work on them together. If you're already decent at rhythm though I'm guessing that won't be much of a problem for you. But yeah, just do chromatic stuff or little scale patterns to work up your speed and finger independence. Something like a 1234; 1324; 1423; 1432 patter on each string is good for that.
#9
Quote by bradman2k6
It'd be good to practice your picking and fretting hand at the same time, so they improve on the same level, rather than assuming your pick hand will catch up. That'll happen, it'll just be slower than if you work on them together. If you're already decent at rhythm though I'm guessing that won't be much of a problem for you. But yeah, just do chromatic stuff or little scale patterns to work up your speed and finger independence. Something like a 1234; 1324; 1423; 1432 patter on each string is good for that.

Legato is the most important technique for leads. I'm not trying to downplay picking, but having a good left hand is just more useful. Even a monster like Gilbert didn't work on his alt picking until he'd already been playing for 9 years. Look at somebody like Marty Friedman who doesn't have a beastly picking hand but is still one of the most respected lead players in the world because of his legato and phrasing. Putting equal focus on both techniques will slow his progress and keep him from maturing compositionally as he will be held back by his technique.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#10
Legato is definitely work learning. I think though that it is more important initially to keep your interest and motivation up. If you lose interest then there is no point.

If you have enough self-discipline, then focus on only one technique and perfect. Don't opt to be a 'jack of all trades'.

I find that learning other people's solos is great for learning lead. It gives you good phrasing and a good idea of what a solo is and how to use it. Some people have no idea... make sure that you learn it.
"We weren’t too ambitious when we started out. We just wanted to be the biggest thing that ever walked the planet."
-- Steven Tyler
#11
Quote by troyponce
Legato is the most important technique for leads. I'm not trying to downplay picking, but having a good left hand is just more useful. Even a monster like Gilbert didn't work on his alt picking until he'd already been playing for 9 years. Look at somebody like Marty Friedman who doesn't have a beastly picking hand but is still one of the most respected lead players in the world because of his legato and phrasing. Putting equal focus on both techniques will slow his progress and keep him from maturing compositionally as he will be held back by his technique.


I hear you man. Your way is probably more of the way I did things anyway haha. I just figured if you work on some legato for a bit, then work on some picking for a bit it could help you become better all around quicker, rather than getting good at one before the other.
#12
pentatonic scales [ BOTH MAJOR AND MINOR],hammerons and pulloffs,listen to old Chuck berry licks they still crop up in solos today to add some spice!