#1
I have the basic standard Epiphone Les Paul guitar. I don't know any other way to describe it other than its the standard beginner red Epiphone Les Paul.

Anyway, it is very uncomfortable. I've changed the strings many times and raised/lowered the action to try and find a comfortable position. When I set the guitar with low action, the strings buzz, so I have to get it as low as possible with no buzz. Needless to say, it is still very uncomfortable.

I play my brothers Fender a lot and I have to say it is way way more comfortable and thus more easy to play on.


Does my problem lie in the settings of my Les Paul or simply the [cheap] guitar itself?


CLIFFS:

- Epiphone Les Paul very uncomfortable
- More expensive Fender much more comfortable
- Changed strings/adjusted action on Epiphone Les Paul, still uncomfortable, hard to play
- Is it the fact that it's just the style of the cheap guitar or can it be fixed in other ways?
Last edited by CousticStrangla at Nov 13, 2007,
#3
i'm guessing it's the cheap guitar, not les pauls in general, but who knows maybe your a strat kinda guy, I prefer my strat to a les paul, cause I love how it feels and sounds

if you feel more comfortable with the fender, you should get one.
#4
It would help to know which model it is. Does it have a metal plate with screws in it where the neck meets the body? If it does, it's a bolt-on neck, and that's your problem, because that means it's a Special, the cheapest Epiphone out there (and a total piece of crap).

If it's a set-neck (meaning the neck is glued into the body), I can't think of anything other than you don't like the feel of an LP neck. If that's true, you're not alone, I myself prefer a thinner neck.
#5
Quote by which ones pink
It would help to know which model it is. Does it have a metal plate with screws in it where the neck meets the body? If it does, it's a bolt-on neck, and that's your problem, because that means it's a Special, the cheapest Epiphone out there (and a total piece of crap).

If it's a set-neck (meaning the neck is glued into the body), I can't think of anything other than you don't like the feel of an LP neck. If that's true, you're not alone, I myself prefer a thinner neck.
Sigh.

The Special-II actually isn't the cheapest one out there, the Junior is. More to the point, the Special-II isn't the only bolt-on LP Epiphone do.

Additionally, Bolt-on necks are usually preferable to set necks when it comes to Epis. All of their necks are exactly the same (e.g. the Elitists have the same neck as their Ultras which are the same necks as the Standards which are the same as the 100s which are the same as the Juniors....), the only difference being the construction; their bolt-on necks have no 'heel' at the join to the body, whereas their set necks have a large heel. That heel limits your upper fret access more, and whether or not it actually provides better sustain than a bolt-on is debatable and usually comes down to the specific guitar in question, and so typically a bolt-on neck is actually preferred for Epis.
Of course the problem with that is they only put bolt-ons on their lower quality instruments anyway.


Anyway, your problem probably isn't the action. If a guitar isn't comfortable for you and the neck isn't suitable, changing the action will never improve this.
Your problem most likely lies in the neck profile, and the scale; LPs are 24.75" scale, Strats are 25.5" scale, slightly larger. Depending on how big you are, this could effect which you find more comfortable to use. Additionally, the Epi neck profile has quite a taper on it, going from fairly slim to comparatively chunky, and this throws a lot of people off; the Fender on the other hand has a less tapered, more consistent neck that is usually somewhat more comfortable for most people.
Then, there is the issue that if you do have a set neck Epi, your upper fret access is going to be shafted, another issue.

Generally, I don't think it has anything to do with how 'cheap' the guitar is. If you find this Epi uncomfortable, you'd be no better off with one of their Gibson-level Elitist guitars or anything.


Moral of the story? Nobody should ever buy an Epi without trying out several before hand and finding a really great one; partly to get around the fact that Epi have random quality control, and also because their necks are rather unusual, you have to make sure it's something you can live with. Personally I find the Epi profile great, the thinner lower end is perfect for rhythm playing and the chunkier high end is great for lead playing, I find, but it's really not for everyone.

If you like the Fender, go get a Fender. That's about aall you can do, I think.
#7
I have a cheap epy too and a strat and i neva play the strat i think you should keep playing with the action and stetting of the les paul until you find that perfect spot i did and now my cheap guitar feels better to me that alot of standars set more expencive guitars and the guitar shop
#8
I don't mean to sound like a smart-ass... But if you're LP doesn't feel good after you've set it up a dozen times, and a Strat's feeling good after one sit down; maybe you should go get yourself a Strat?
#9
Quote by ch0
I don't mean to sound like a smart-ass... But if you're LP doesn't feel good after you've set it up a dozen times, and a Strat's feeling good after one sit down; maybe you should go get yourself a Strat?


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---
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#11
adjusting the action at the bridge isnt the only way to set up a guitar.

if u've changed the strings a bunch of times, and cant get the action low without buzzing you need to check ur neck angle.

i can help with the guitar's action, if you want then repost.

as for the thickness of the neck, and the upper fret access. i suggest you try adjusting strap height.

and if you just cant get comfortable, then look at selling it used and buying a guitar that fits you better.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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#12
The LP and strats are completely different to play. They hang different on the strap. The strat has the nice contour for your arm to sit on instead of an almost sharp edge. Most LPs are heavier. There are different neck profiles on the LPs mine has the 60s slim taper. I dont know what contour the bolt neck LP has. I have 2 strats and a LP, I prefer the LP. The shorter scale should feel easier to play than a strat. But I do know from personal experience how little effort is put into the action on an lower price epi. Many I have seen have wavy fret boards which forces you to raise the action. And that of course makes it harder to play. The strats are usually easier to set action on as if you have one string that buzzes you dont need to raise the entire bridge to compensate. I wouldnt condemn them all try a higher priced one and see how it is, and try several at one time some will feel better than others. I was able to make mine much better to play by replacing and leveling the frets.
#13
Bro its all about finding the right guitar for you....take my story for example.... i have owned some very "high quality" guitars as in a Gibson Les Paul Custom AND Studio, a Fender American Telecaster, and a Epiphone Les Paul Standard..... none of them felt right.....i would play and just get frusterated expecially since i would be spending thousands of dollars on a guitar that was known for its "quality"........ my studio was $1200 the custom was $3000........the studio played better. Gibson has gone down the drain. On Saturday i got my Washburn Idol 66 Pro in.... i am the happiest i have been with guitars in a long time. its MY GUITAR. i love the feel of it. it plays better than ANY guitar ive ever but my hands on period. it cost me $499. THE POINT IS you have to find the guitar for you. and dont go looking for the big "quality" brands cause my washburn as no fret buzz at all sounds better than any gibson ive ever played/own. and btw i actually liked my little Epi LP standard spinoff it was a pretty fun little guitar untill the headstock snapped off lol
#14
Quote by creamsoda90
Bro its all about finding the right guitar for you.


I agree, i personally find the epi les paul standard very comfortable.
#15
Quote by which ones pink
It would help to know which model it is. Does it have a metal plate with screws in it where the neck meets the body? If it does, it's a bolt-on neck, and that's your problem, because that means it's a Special, the cheapest Epiphone out there (and a total piece of crap).

If it's a set-neck (meaning the neck is glued into the body), I can't think of anything other than you don't like the feel of an LP neck. If that's true, you're not alone, I myself prefer a thinner neck.



Yeah I think it must be the Special because it does have the bolt on neck.
#16
well if you want to look at the action a bit, let me know.

look at it this way, if it was a couple hundred or less, at least you didnt spend a grad on a guitar that doesnt fit.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

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#17
Quote by bokuho

Your problem most likely lies in the neck profile, and the scale; LPs are 24.75" scale, Strats are 25.5" scale, slightly larger. Depending on how big you are, this could effect which you find more comfortable to use.



Is the lengthwise or widthwise along the neck?

Also, thanks a lot for your response, it was very very helpful!
#18
Quote by ch0
I don't mean to sound like a smart-ass... But if you're LP doesn't feel good after you've set it up a dozen times, and a Strat's feeling good after one sit down; maybe you should go get yourself a Strat?



That is a very good point and hence the reason why at the moment I am leaning more towards the Strat. I just love the look and sound of LP's though, moreso than Strats.
#19
Quote by jj1565
well if you want to look at the action a bit, let me know.

look at it this way, if it was a couple hundred or less, at least you didnt spend a grad on a guitar that doesnt fit.



Sure I'd appreciate it!

Also, can you tell me what the diff between "24-3/4" scale" means (seen here at http://www.guitarcenter.com/Epiphone-Limited-Edition-Les-Paul-Custom-104065958-i1168180.gc)
and "12" neck radius" means (http://www.guitarcenter.com/Fender-Deluxe-Player-s-Stratocaster-Electric-Guitar-511597-i1147164.gc) ? Thanks a lot!
#20
24-3/4" is the length of ur neck from ur 'nut' to the '12th fret', and multiplied by two.

12" neck radius is the curve on the fretboard is part of a circle with a 12" radius.

i like my guitars around 9.5" fretboard radius, they're more comfortable for me. and I suggest you check out some stratocasters and similar guitars with a skinnier neck that's easier to hold. Epiphones have VERY fat necks, with an exception of the classic quilt top model. those have acceptable necks.
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#22
Quote by ECistheBest
24-3/4" is the length of ur neck from ur 'nut' to the '12th fret', and multiplied by two.

12" neck radius is the curve on the fretboard is part of a circle with a 12" radius.

i like my guitars around 9.5" fretboard radius, they're more comfortable for me. and I suggest you check out some stratocasters and similar guitars with a skinnier neck that's easier to hold. Epiphones have VERY fat necks, with an exception of the classic quilt top model. those have acceptable necks.



Cool, so how would you describe the distance between the frets?
#23
Quote by CousticStrangla
Sure I'd appreciate it!



well, just
fret the low E on the first fret, at the same time,
fret the low E on the last fret, where the neck and body meet.

with both places held, look at the middle frets. 7-9th.

if the string lays on the fretwire there, then you dont have enough bend.
if the string is more than a credit cards thickness up from the wire there,
then you have too much neck gap.

so measure and see, maybe we can make an adjustment.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


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#24
Quote by CousticStrangla
Cool, so how would you describe the distance between the frets?

longer scale necks have longer distance between frets. some short scale necks get really tight at the high frets. way too close for my stubby fingers.

longer scale guitars are twangier with more tension on the strings. harder to get some pick attack without tuning lower. short scale guitars get more pick attack because the lower tension on the strings. not so twangy either.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


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