#2
Wouldn't the current be added together? It's an interesting thought though.
Quote by marsvoltaguy
i say both. you always have the option to not use the pedal at all but it will still be there like that obsessed chick you took to homecoming and never called again, sitting there waiting for your call. so yea both
#4
Well it deppends on what effects you are using and what order they are put in.

like if you have a flanger and an over dirve/distortion set-up you can get 2 sounds.
1. flanger 1st/ OD,Dist. 2nd=more flange in ur tone and the OD will sound muffled a bit
2. OD, Dist. 1st/flanger 2nd=the flange effect isnt as powerfull and ut can create a kinda of techno-like sound depending on ur bsae settings( treb./mid/bass )

and effects can change like this depending on what they are and what not
#5
Unless I'm mistaken, I believe that that is the sort of the thing you'd do if you were running different effects to at least two separate amps. For instance, using a boss chorus pedal to split your signal, and then running one channel directly into an amp, and the other into a delay, or some other effect, and then into an amp. This is similar to something Brian May would do live with 3 stacks of 3 Vox-AC30s, but that was just to achieve cool delay effects, I'm not sure that there would be many other applications, unless you wanted to play with two entirely different sounds at once.
Haven't you heard?

It's a battle of words
#6
Quote by Sdooper_Man
Well it deppends on what effects you are using and what order they are put in.

like if you have a flanger and an over dirve/distortion set-up you can get 2 sounds.
1. flanger 1st/ OD,Dist. 2nd=more flange in ur tone and the OD will sound muffled a bit
2. OD, Dist. 1st/flanger 2nd=the flange effect isnt as powerfull and ut can create a kinda of techno-like sound depending on ur bsae settings( treb./mid/bass )

and effects can change like this depending on what they are and what not



I'm not sure if you understood the question, I'm talking about linking the pedals side by side instead of one after the other. The most simple way to do this would be to use a Y splitter cable that basically makes one cable give 2 outputs. But I imagine that there would be problems with impedance mismatching and current issues, so I dunno, that's why I's asking.
#7
Well if you started with a pedal that had stereo outputs you could send one side to one pedal and then the other side to another pedal, and then when they come back again you'd different effects coming from each channel. I imagine that would sound either horrible or absolutely awesome, depending on the effects.
#8
Well you could try it on a cheap solid state amp and you'd probably get away with it. If you have a circuit with two resistors in parallel the resistance is 1/r1 + 1/r2 = 1/r total. i can imagine that you would get some unique sounds. I was just thinking today about an application for this that could be cool, if you had two tremolo pedals that had different speeds, say 1second and 1.3 seconds you would get some awesome syncopation as the two pedals reinforced and canceled each other out. But i'm not really sure what would happen.
Quote by marsvoltaguy
i say both. you always have the option to not use the pedal at all but it will still be there like that obsessed chick you took to homecoming and never called again, sitting there waiting for your call. so yea both
#9
is there a difference between a whammy pedal and a wah-wah pedal?
#10
a whammy pedal is made by digitech,
wiki The Digitech Whammy is a pitch-shifter effects pedal manufactured by Digitech. It gives musicians the ability to shift the pitch of their electric guitar up or down in real time by rocking a treadle pedal up and down with their foot, similar to how a wah pedal affects the tone of a guitar based on the position of the treadle.
Quote by marsvoltaguy
i say both. you always have the option to not use the pedal at all but it will still be there like that obsessed chick you took to homecoming and never called again, sitting there waiting for your call. so yea both
#11
Wah - frequency response altering
Whammy - pitch shifting.
"Everybody, one day will die and be forgotten. Act and behave in a way that will make life interesting and fun. Find a passion, form relationships, don't be afraid to get out there and fuck what everyone else thinks."
#12
Quote by flashbandit
I dont own any, but I was just wondering if anyone ever hooked up their pedals in parallel, and what the benefits/drawbacks would be.

I've never tried this, but lets examine how it might work:


1 - You can't put the pedals DIRECTLY in parallel.

a - Your guitar would be driving way too many inputs and the tone would suffer.
b - The outputs of each pedal would "fight" each other. You might even cause damage as the output on one or of the pedals tried to source or sink more current than it was capable of safely doing.
c - The internal bypass switching of most pedals connect the input jack directly to the output jack. That means that any other pedal in the system would have the input and output connected together, even when switch to effect mode. The circuit might break into severe oscillation (squealing). This would sound terrible, along with sending a hugh signal to your amp that might cause damage if the amp was turned up. Having that oscillation going back through the instrument cable to your guitar won't do your guitar any favors, either.


2 - If you were going to attempt this, you would need:

a - A buffer to drive each of the pedals with the signal from you guitar separately.
b - All of your pedals would be turned on and in "effect mode" at all times.
c - Each effect would drive a separate channel on a mixer.
d - The mixer would have a switching arrangement to select which effect(s) and/or the "clean signal" would be sent to the amplifier.


3 - Let's take just one example of how this would differ from a serial chain of effects:

If you selected a fuzz and a wah you would have a clean signal being toneshaped by the wah sent to the mixer. Also sent there would be the distorted signal from the fuzz. That signal would NOT be altered as the wah pedal is moved. Only the clean signal would be "wah'ed"


4 - Analysis/speculation:

I would imagine you could come up with some very interesting sounds this way. But unless you take the time to do it properly, the results from just hard-wiring things in parallel would vary from basically useless at best, to destruction of equipment at worst.


Due caution is indicated.


Cheers,
SYK
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#13
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
I've never tried this, but lets examine how it might work:


1 - You can't put the pedals DIRECTLY in parallel.

a - Your guitar would be driving way too many inputs and the tone would suffer.
b - The outputs of each pedal would "fight" each other. You might even cause damage as the output on one or of the pedals tried to source or sink more current than it was capable of safely doing.
c - The internal bypass switching of most pedals connect the input jack directly to the output jack. That means that any other pedal in the system would have the input and output connected together, even when switch to effect mode. The circuit might break into severe oscillation (squealing). This would sound terrible, along with sending a hugh signal to your amp that might cause damage if the amp was turned up. Having that oscillation going back through the instrument cable to your guitar won't do your guitar any favors, either.


2 - If you were going to attempt this, you would need:

a - A buffer to drive each of the pedals with the signal from you guitar separately.
b - All of your pedals would be turned on and in "effect mode" at all times.
c - Each effect would drive a separate channel on a mixer.
d - The mixer would have a switching arrangement to select which effect(s) and/or the "clean signal" would be sent to the amplifier.


3 - Let's take just one example of how this would differ from a serial chain of effects:

If you selected a fuzz and a wah you would have a clean signal being toneshaped by the wah sent to the mixer. Also sent there would be the distorted signal from the fuzz. That signal would NOT be altered as the wah pedal is moved. Only the clean signal would be "wah'ed"


4 - Analysis/speculation:

I would imagine you could come up with some very interesting sounds this way. But unless you take the time to do it properly, the results from just hard-wiring things in parallel would vary from basically useless at best, to destruction of equipment at worst.


Due caution is indicated.


Cheers,
SYK


WOW, your like some kind of god !