#1
Can anyone recommend a website or whatever that tells me which chord progressions match the different modes?

I've experimented a bit, but with little success. Like are you meant to play "B mixolydian" over a chord progression in the key of B?

Thanks heaps.
The best guitar lesson site: http://www.justinguitar.com/

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#2
you basically take the mode, see what chords the mode creates when you stack the thirds, then you will have your chords. All major modes essentially make the same chords off different degrees... but off the first degree-
Ionian - Maj7 / Maj9 etc
Dorian - Min7 / Min9
Phrygian - Min7 / Min7b9 / Min7 b13
Lydian - Maj7#11
Mixolydian - Dominant chords - _7 _9 _11 _13
Aeolian - Min7/Min7b13
Locrian - dim / M7b5
#3
Most people wouldnt play just one mode over a chord progression. Most people will change the mode, that they believe they are playing, to the chord that is playing. Or at least play a major mode (listed in branny's post) over a major chord or a minor mode over a minor mode. The mode really gets it's power and feeling from the chord underneath, which is probably the reason chords are usually played underneath solo's and melody's.

So no. Over a chord progression in the key of B, most people wouldnt play exclussively B mixolydian.

If you wanted to be lazy and play random notes of a scale/mode without any care or thought of what you are playing, I would suggest B major (ionian) over a B major progression. It will fit it better than B mixolydian.
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Last edited by demonofthenight at Nov 14, 2007,
#4
Here's the deal:

To make a "modal chord" you have to find the note unique to that scale and play it within the chord. For example:

- Ionian is just the 1, 3, 5, a basic major chord.
- Mixolydian (dominant), has a b7.

NOTE: Mostly, major chords are built off the Mixolydian scale. Your average major chord, then, can be considered "dominant" as well, even though it doesn't contain the seventh.

- Lydian chords would have the #4, which is... very strange. It works sometimes but in general terms you'll be playing a Lydian scale over another kind of major chord.

- Minor. Very easy - 1, b3, 5.
- Dorian. Combine the natural 6 with the b3 in a chord to get this.

NOTE: This is very much like the Ionian/Mixolydian relationship in that minor chords are built off the Dorian scale unless otherwise noted or communicated.

- Phrygian chords have the b2, as this is what defines the Phrygian scale. Note that this is the b9 as well. You'll rarely see a chord with "b2" because of the proximity to the root note.

- Locrian chords are better known as "diminished" IIRC. b3 AND b5. Primarily used in jazz, I suppose. Not even metal likes this because even metal likes to resolve to a perfect 5th, 4th or octave chord.

Calling these chords by their modal names isn't exactly accurate. You're not going to call a chord "Phrygian", for example, rather you'd say something like "Am b9" or something like that, and a Locrian chord might be "Cm b5".
Also note that chords are very specific when referring to octaves. An 11th chord uses the second octave of the 4th from the root note, for example. You can't use the usual 4th - it has to be the second octave for an 11th chord! ... otherwise it'd be a 4th chord, see?
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
Last edited by MadassAlex at Nov 14, 2007,
#5
^theres no deal.

Simply minor chords under minor modes and major chords under major modes. Simple. You can, but dont need to, add extra degrees in like the #4 in a lydian mode to further enhance the ambiguity of the mode. But you dont need to and I've seen few people do this.

And the chord that fits under the locrian mode is a diminished chord (1, b3, b5). Augmented chords (1, 3, #5) fit into a mode of the harmonic minor scale and are completely different in feel to diminished chords. And metal are some of the main users of the diminished chord. Whats that song by rush thats all dissonant? (sorry not a big rush fan )
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[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#6
Quote by MadassAlex
- Locrian chords are better known as "augmented" IIRC. b3 AND b5. Primarily used in jazz, I suppose. Not even metal like this because even metal likes to resolve to a perfect 5th, 4th or octave chord.


That would diminished or half diminished. Augmented chords = 1 3 #5
#7
Quote by MadassAlex
Calling these chords by their modal names isn't exactly accurate. You're not going to call a chord "Phrygian", for example


This is actually quite common in jazz circles, and with most musicians I've played with. Typically in jazz, we substitute standard maj7 & m7 chords with their 'modal characteristic' chord, so we associate X chord with X mode.

For example, instead of playing E Phrygian over an E-7 chord, it's typical to play the susb9 chord (7sus4b9: 1 - 4 - 5 - b7 - b9), we call this chord the 'phrygian chord' because of it's association with the phrygian mode of the major scale, and phrygian dominant mode of the harmonic minor scale. Instead of F Lydian over Fmaj7, we'll play Fmaj7#11 and call this a 'Lydian chord' during conversation.

Q:'What's the chord?'
A:'F Lydian'

... is quite a common exchange with people within a jazz environment I've played with.
#8
^^^ Thanks for the corrections

Generally the only jazz musician I jam with is my teacher, and we just spell it out via root notes, major/minor, and any additional notes.

And metal are some of the main users of the diminished chord. Whats that song by rush thats all dissonant? (sorry not a big rush fan )


Sometimes. Certain technical death metal bands, for instance, will use these but most bands avoid anything that isn't root/5th, root/4th, root/3rd, root/b3rd, or root/5#. I think minor chords sound awesome with a nice smothering of distortion. It's probably got to do with the speed required of a lot of metal. Not enough time to get all your fingers in check, I guess.
A prime example of avoidance of triads in general is the staples of extreme metal itself. Death, Slayer, Testament, Heathen... none of them really broke the root/5th diad formula.

That said, I'm not surprised that Rush did it - they're the best progressive rock around, and unlike many extreme metal bands they don't really need to play fast (even though they can and will, YYZ ftw).

Ironically, a better example of triads in metal is in the decidedly mainstream Crazy Train main riff, where Randy Rhoads plays an A major chord, a G#m b6, a F# b6 and another A major. Keep in mind I'm not too knowledgable on chord inversions. I have a feeling those minor b6 chords are inversions.
Point is, only crazy f*ckers like Necrophagist and Randy Rhoads tend to break out of the diads described above, and even when they do it's in a contemporary setting. You won't find any traditional metal with distorted triads in the rhythm.
Quote by marmoseti
Mastering your instrument is being able to play whatever you hear in your head, unhindered by inadequate technique. After that, it's all about what you've got to say, so there would be no "best," just a bunch of people saying exactly what they mean.
#9
ok, that's great, thanks very much for your time and advice.
The best guitar lesson site: http://www.justinguitar.com/

Ibanez RG565
Fender Japan Telecaster TC72-78
Korg Ax1500G
Ibanez Weeping Demon Wah
Boss MD-2
Boss DD-6
#10
Quote by demonofthenight
^Whats that song by rush thats all dissonant? (sorry not a big rush fan )


I know this an old thread....but I just gotta answer this heavy question because I know....
....the answer is...ALL of them!
And they're called "Alex Chords".