#1
I've been trying to understand scales and I found a really good lesson, but there are points such as:

"Lets say you want to descend in C (which is the 8th fret of the 6th string)"

How is the 8th fret of the 6th string a C note? Is there a certain theory behind it or are am I just supposed to memorize the notes individually?

Thanks.

Also, I feel like I've been making a lot of dumb topic recently so I apologize for that.
#2
The open strings of the guitar are E A D G B e, and for each fret you go up a semitone from the pitch of the open string.

For example, F is the first fret on either of the E strings, because it's a semitone up. Gb would be next, and so on.

And in standard tuning, the strings are 5 semitones apart, so 8th fret on E would be the same as 3rd fret on A, both being the same note of C.

Hope that made sense/helped.
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#3
notes go A A# B C C# D D# E F F# G G#

So start with one you know, ie open string A or whatever, then count the frets as you go.
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#4
just remember how many semitones in between each note

all you really need to know is that F is on semitone higher than E and C is one semitone higher than B

all the others are 2 semitones apart (i think, i always screw these things up)

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#6
So basically it's all relative to what string you play on, correct? Let's say that I want to play D#. I could do it on both:

[6th fret of the A string] or on the [4th fret of the B string]? Am I doing it correct?
#7
Quote by abhiramtheking
How is the 8th fret of the 6th string a C note? Is there a certain theory behind it or are am I just supposed to memorize the notes individually?

Thanks.

Also, I feel like I've been making a lot of dumb topic recently so I apologize for that.

The theory behind it is actually quite simple. Notes occur at a certain frequency. For example, when you use a tuning fork, they're usually at the note A at 440 Hz, meaning the wave oscillates 440 times per second. When you move up an octave, you're doubling the frequency. When you move down, you're halving it, so A occurs at 220 Hz, 440 Hz, 880 Hz, etc. Every time you fret a note, you're shortening the length of the string, thereby increasing its oscillation speed, increasing the pitch. I'm not exactly sure how many Hz the note C on the 8th fret of your low E string oscillates at, but that's the theory behind it.
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Last edited by Dirk Gently at Nov 14, 2007,
#8
Quote by abhiramtheking
So basically it's all relative to what string you play on, correct? Let's say that I want to play D#. I could do it on both:

[6th fret of the A string] or on the [4th fret of the B string]? Am I doing it correct?

Yeah, exactly. Or it could also be 1st fret on the D string, the 4th on B would be the next octave up.
Quote by Andron17
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Bassist for Half My Kingdom.