#1
I hold my pick close to th ende, I strike a note and brush my thumb over the harmonic spot, just before the neck pickup.


khaaaaaaaaaaaaa

the harmonic last for may 2 seconds and then fades away.

People like zakk wylde and thoumas from nightwish make harmonics that sound to rich and full. I've heard it's about finding a sweet spot, but I've tried and tried every spot on all the string and still nothing, can anyone helps me?
Last edited by psyks at Nov 14, 2007,
#2
It depends on the guitar and pickups. First off, make sure you have a lot of gain on. That's how you get the sustain. Next, try doing it quickly. The more time you spend on the string the less it'll ring out. Then, like you've heard, there's a sweet spot. Check just above your pickups, behind, and ahead. Think like there's a half circle coming out from your pickups. You want to be on the line of the half circle.
#3
In this case, you can actually say it's the equipment's fault. Some high output pickups and a gainy amp, that's what the rockers do.

And so does Zakk.
#4
yes there are sweet spot like right after the neck pick up and right before the bridge pick up every guitar is different and a good wide vibrato help as well, and remember that perfect practice makes perfect
#5
Turn up the gain on your amp, select the bridge pickup for maximum effect. I usually can get better harmonics in the middle frets, where the string has the most amount of play. Other than that, it just takes practice to be able to play them at will; they kinda have a certain feel to them and you just need to be able to get that feel Good luck man
#6
well, I went over to my guitar shop and tried out a few amps, a tiiiiny ibanez tube amp, 5 watt, and then a bigger vox tube 15 watt, and while I was a little worried about embaressing myself in front of the owner with my failed harmonic, I tried it still didn't work. I usually play with full gain, so I should work on the sustain. Pick faster, live longer, I'll remember that

The only other issue I have is that when I do make a harmonic, it never sounds at the same pitch as the original note. If you've ever heard grab bag my megadeth, during the riff in the middle, he occasionally turns one of the notes into a pinch harmonic, and it sounds at the same pitch. I know Ive never read anything about this before, so... ?
#7
Harmonics are just notes at a higher octave, so if you know theory that should help. But pinching it changes that a little. You're basically using your thumb as a fretboard to make a floating harmonic. So it can be a pain to find the right harmony ect. Usually, it should sound good if you play the normal note first then pinch it the second time you run through it.
#8
and I have a jackson DK2 with seymore duncan pickups and soon to be a vox AD15VT amp
#9
Quote by psyks
and I have a jackson DK2 with seymore duncan pickups and soon to be a vox AD15VT amp


It's probably not your gear than man. I know a lot of people will say this is the opposite of what you should do, but try palm muting some open and let it ring. While it's ringing out, try to pinch. See if it sounds any better like that.
#12
Quote by trsc
It's probably not your gear than man. I know a lot of people will say this is the opposite of what you should do, but try palm muting some open and let it ring. While it's ringing out, try to pinch. See if it sounds any better like that.

Any string in particular? I usually go for G like with most other harmonics I try, but I can usually make pinches sound better on lower strings
#15
hmm, I could swear that riff contains a pinch, or maybe my ears decieve me and it's just effects on the amp or pedal with a wide vibrato. This may also explain why I couldn't get it right.

All laugh at me now
#17
sooooooooooo...

*cough* if is isn't a pinch *cough* what is it? *cough* *cough*

did I get it right? and if not, how do I do it? And if I was right......... how do I do it?