#2
What type of music do you like?

There are better guitars in the price range, but Epis aren't too bad.
Recognized by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#3
Well can you recommend something better for around 300-400?

I like rock, classic rock, punk, and some metal
#4
Vox DA5

Roland Microcube

2 good practice amps.

The Hagstrom F-200 is a spectacular guitar in that price range.
Recognized by the Official EG/GG&A Who To Listen To List 2008
Quote by utsapp89
^I'd let a pro look at it. Once you get into the technicalities of screws...well, it's just a place you don't want to be, friend.
#5
strats are good as starter guitars, and fender amps are great as well
SHOWBREAD

Quote by cheese_weasel
Winner of the intellectual comment of the day award.
#9
The Epi LPs aren't bad, nor are the Squier Strats/Teles. However I always recommend a Yamaha Pacifica over these two, 'cause basically they're miles ahead! The 412V is a hell of a lot of guitar for the price, but you could always get the cheaper 112 and spend a bit more on your amp.


As for amplification, there are two routes to go down - either you get an affordable and highly versatile solid state amp, for example the Roland Cube 30 or Vox AD15. these give you a huge range of tones, but are definitely best used only for practicing - they aren't really built for anything more demanding.

Alternatively you can buy a small valve amp such as the Epiphone Valve Junior or the Fender Champ 600. These tend to have a greatly superior tone, especially for blues and rock, but are nowhere near as versatile as a solid state amp. For heavy distorted tones you'd need an overdrive pedal to get the best out of this type of amp.

Personally, I'd suggest one of the little tube amps since they're a lot more 'grown-up' sounding and will last you for years. Also they help you develop your ear for tone much quicker, which is pretty essential skill for guitarists.
You'll find most people here learned to play on solid-state amps, but in the last year or so a load of super-affordable tube practice amps have appeared on sale, meaning no-one needs to put up with crappy tone and buzzy distortion any more! What you choose depends on whether versatility or tone is more important, really....

Your best bet is to go down to a guitar store, try out lots of different stuff, and see what feels right!
#10
i bought my epiphone les paul standard about two months ago, i played acustic for about 10 months before buying it and now it i love it, just having nicer guitar encougaged me to practice more, i have only been playing a year and may not know much, but i saw that the epiphone les paul standard is great. and also marshall amps are good