#1
Ok, so besides just doing my scales out of my book, how can I really learn them. I hear musicians always talking about learning the modes. But what are they. All I really know about scales is the pattern they run on and what key they're in. How do I really get to know my scales and modes?
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#2
learn them in 2 and 3 octaves all over the neck.
learn which ones share common tones so you can switch modes smoothly.
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#3
So you're saying I should just play all the scales in the key of C and see which ones sound closesly related enough to switch back and forth from. I'm sure the scales and modes have a breakdown in which they tell you which ones are related to which?!? If it's just memorizing the scales and seeing which ones sound right to switch to, then I'm plain out screwed. Any technical advice you can give?
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ate a girl out on her period...

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#4
Quote by bambamm89
So you're saying I should just play all the scales in the key of C and see which ones sound closesly related enough to switch back and forth from. I'm sure the scales and modes have a breakdown in which they tell you which ones are related to which?!? If it's just memorizing the scales and seeing which ones sound right to switch to, then I'm plain out screwed. Any technical advice you can give?



you can do what joe satriani does using pitch axis theory.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=LWHKeC4IEgA
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#5
Ok so I have one question long ago I learned a pattern, what is the difference between a pattern and a scale, and how can you combine the two?
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ate a girl out on her period...

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#6
a pattern and a scale can be the same thing. a scale is a series of notes, you use a pattern on the fretboard to play the series of notes.

you can learn your scales by looking them up here: http://www.all-guitar-chords.com

It has every scale, every mode, in every key, in every position on the neck.

The way I learned is first by learning the major scale in patterns on the neck in a certain position. Once you have that mastered in a certain key, go to a different position on the neck and learn the same scale in a different pattern. It's easier if you know all of the notes on the fretboard though. Once you know that, then you can start looking into modes and alterations of the major scale, which give it a unique sound. Also, I found it's easy if you learn interevals, like 1st, minor 2nd, major 2nd, minor 3rd, major third....etc. all from a certain major scale. Like E is the major 3rd of C, and so on. Then you can look into other scales like harmonic minor and stuff like that. Just take it one slow step at a time, and try not to get too overwhelmed by it. If you dive in too deep at one, it'll all go over your head, because that's what happened with me when I very first started learning theory. Then I just started by learning major scales, then interevals, and it progresses from there. Best of luck.
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There are no boring scales, just boring guitarists.

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#7
Well I have the guitar scale bible and try to practice everyday, but I guess I need a Theory class to break everything down for me. I understand the difference in scales and patterns now. But I'm still having issues getting deep into scale study.
Quote by die_kenny_die
ate a girl out on her period...

i regret nothing.


I know how to shred paper, does that count?
#9
I modes are just alterations of the major scale. There are seven modes for the major scale: Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Locrian, each of these modes exhibit a different feeling, if your familiar with steps take a look at this. The one at the top is just the major scale's steps repeated.

WWHWWWHWWHWWWHWWHWWWH
Ionian WWHWWWH
Dorian WHWWWHW
Phrygian HWWWHWW
Lydian WWWHWWH
Mixolydian WWHWWHW
Aeolian WHWWHWW
Locrian HWWHWWW

See the pattern, well I can't make it perfectly appear on the comment box so if you want to see the patern clearly, write those step patterns diagonally? Well, as far as I can understand it, modes are also scales the only difference is that they are derivations of the major scale, and just like the major scale, they're all diatonic.
Last edited by domenic_665 at Nov 16, 2007,
#10
What exactly does diatonic mean?
Quote by die_kenny_die
ate a girl out on her period...

i regret nothing.


I know how to shred paper, does that count?
#11
diatonic is the opposite of chromatic. in a chromatic scale, you name the note by keeping the same letter but adding sharp or flat signs depending if you're ascending or descending. a diatonic scale means you can have the same pitch as on a chromatic scale, but it'll have a different letter. it has to do with naming enharmonic notes, which are the same pitch, but different names depending if you want to name them or write them using the same letter or a different letter.
Quote by steven seagull
There are no boring scales, just boring guitarists.

Quote by convictionless
dude calebrocker, that first song on your list almost made me cry
11/10
you win my good sir

^ My For Mom cover

Check out my MP3s!!
#12
Quote by calebrocker
diatonic is the opposite of chromatic. in a chromatic scale, you name the note by keeping the same letter but adding sharp or flat signs depending if you're ascending or descending. a diatonic scale means you can have the same pitch as on a chromatic scale, but it'll have a different letter. it has to do with naming enharmonic notes, which are the same pitch, but different names depending if you want to name them or write them using the same letter or a different letter.


Yeah, and diatonic means seven-tone scale, without any names of those notes repeated, yeah, nad it has something to do with enharmonic notes
#14
Okay, so if you know your major scales, then you know your modes. After you know your major scale, you can find your way through any mode.

The way that really helped me memorize all my modes was by coming up with this little diddy:

I Don't Punch Like Mohammed Ali.

The "I" in this is for the Ionian, or Major scale. The "D" in don't is for Dorian, "P" in punch= phrygian, "L" in like = lydian, M in mohammed= mixolydian, A in ali= aeolian, and the "L" in ali is for locrian.

Ya dig? So lets put this bad boy to work.

Lets do C Major (Ionian). it would be C D E F G A B (C)

The relative Dorian to this would be D
The relative Phyrigian to this would be E
The relative Lydian would be F
The relative Mixolydian would be G
The relative Aeolian would be A
The relative Locrian would be B

notice how i used the order of the notes in the key i was in, and the order of the modes to figure it out all the modes that share the same key signature.

so for a G mixolydian you would play all the same notes as C Major (Ionian) only you're starting on C. So it would be G A B C D E F (G)
E7#9
#15
Okay, so that helps me somewhat, thanks. Do certain Modes have like a genre? I mean I know that Major has more of a happy tone, minor has more of a sad tone. So what about the others?
Quote by die_kenny_die
ate a girl out on her period...

i regret nothing.


I know how to shred paper, does that count?
#16
^Play them and see what you think of them

The way to use modes and get their different sounds is to think of the intervals it is made up of. Phrygian has a b2, a dark, dissononant interval. Lydian has a #4, which sounds... I dunno how to describe it but it sounds cool. Mixolydian is like the major scale but has a b7, making it bluesy and dominant.

Just drone the low E string, keep it ringing (clean setting works best). Then on the remaining five stings, play E Phrygian, E lydian, E Aeloian, E Ionian etc. and emphasise the unique intervals in each. Really listen to each scales' characteristics. Try making a melody from each mode while droning the E string.

Once you have done this, watch this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWHKeC4IEgA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoGQ9yHOyZQ
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#17
The most important aspects of scales are the notes they use and the intervals between them...approaching them as patterns is the wrong way to go about it, where you put your fingers is the least important part.
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