#3
.... Is that like asking where socks go after the laundry eats them? Because seriously, I have no idea.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#5
Where do we go after we die? We are recycled.

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jthm_guitarist
Warned for trolling!


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Didn't you say that you had a stuffed fox that you would occasionally fuck?

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#6
They go to file heaven.
I can honestly say I have really been far even as decided to use even go want to do look more like.


I don't always post on UG, but when I do, I post in the Pit. Stay thirsty my friends.
#7
It must suck to get recovered then...

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#8
i think they get deleted for good, unlike HDD's they just delete the file from the index table thats why you can recover data. on thumb drives they store the information diffrently and i think it just wipes that area clean...could be wrong though!
#9
On a PC or a Mac? Mac holds on to the files for a little bit, in a trash folder, that's hidden. It's saved me a couple of times already.
Why are we so wicked indecisive
Let's hit the streets with toy explosives
And let's enjoy what we have
#11
It depends on the type of drive and the filesystem on the drive.

In MOST cases, if you delete something, provided you don't try to save something else, then it will still be there. It basically marks the portions previously used by your file as available, but the data is still there. As soon as you write something else to the drive you risk overwriting it though.

Some flash drives use what is called wear leveling though. Since flash drives have a relatively low lifespan (about 10,000 writes IIRC), some drives will spread the data across different portions of the drive instead of constantly writing to the same location. This helps keep the drive life high, but makes cases like yours difficult. If you were being investigated for a crime, it would be an investigator's dream since most wipe software won't write over all the information on the drive, but if you have to actually recover the data it becomes difficult and most easy to use data recovery software won't work.
#12
Quote by LordSephiroth
It depends on the type of drive and the filesystem on the drive.

In MOST cases, if you delete something, provided you don't try to save something else, then it will still be there. It basically marks the portions previously used by your file as available, but the data is still there. As soon as you write something else to the drive you risk overwriting it though.

Some flash drives use what is called wear leveling though. Since flash drives have a relatively low lifespan (about 10,000 writes IIRC), some drives will spread the data across different portions of the drive instead of constantly writing to the same location. This helps keep the drive life high, but makes cases like yours difficult. If you were being investigated for a crime, it would be an investigator's dream since most wipe software won't write over all the information on the drive, but if you have to actually recover the data it becomes difficult and most easy to use data recovery software won't work.

You seem to have all the answers.

Where do we go when we die?