#1
Ok I am tryin to re-finish a Washburn House of Blues edition with an EVH paint scheme. every tutorial says to use nitrocellulose paint 2 questions, what is it? and why use it instead of regular krylon? Thanks in advance
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#2
Nitro is what they used on vintage guitars. It's harder than acrylic laquer and KTM 9 and it doesn't deaden the tone as much as poly. Regular spraypaints are not hard and they deaden tone so they have no good reason to be used on a guitar at all. Another advantage of Nitro is that it is really easy to get a pro finish with the stuff. It doesn't take half the work that acrylic laquer does.
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#3
So is Nitro over Acrylic just like the equivilant to 2K laquer on cars over 1k.
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#4
Sorry, I don't know how it works with car laquer but I bet algee would know.
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#5
I have no idea about any of this stuff... But I have read that nitro ages much nicer. As in it actually ages, and gets thin spots and wears down to a beautiful relic over time much nicer than poly.

Is this true?
#6
ok sweet, so what about the primer is there a nitro primer?
let me re-phrase that, is a nitro primer necessary?
"You mean that hot dog I just ate was sammy hagar?"
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Last edited by EVH4ever at Nov 16, 2007,
#7
^Depending on the type of wood you are finishing, you might want to use a sealer but you don't have to. Just a couple clearcoats before adding any color can be enough. Again this is something algee knows more about than me because I don't realy like Nitro so I don't use it. I use KTM 9, shellac, or True Oil.

^x2 nitro does turn yellow as it's exposed to UV light and it does wear out, chip, crack, and it turns white when exposed to moisture for long streaches. Poly wears really slow, doesn't change color, chip, or crack, and it's waterproof. So I guess you could say that Nitro ages and poly doesn't. If you want your guitar to age then that makes poly a bad finish but if you want your guitar to always look as new as the day you got it then poly can be a very nice finish. The 2 real drawbacks of poly are that it dampens tone more than nitro and it feels rubbery to the touch.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Nov 16, 2007,
#9
Quote by forsaknazrael
Do you really think poly deadens the tone?


Yes. It doesn't deaden it a lot, but I can hear a differance.

EDIT: Does KTM9 come in rattle can form?


Nope, it just comes in paint tins and www.lmii.com is the only place I know of that sells the stuff. I find KTM 9 to go on better with a cheap sponge brush than any other application method anyway. I've used a spray gun, an HVLP spay gun, they flat painting pads, nice expensive brushes, rollers, and nothing is as good as a cheap disposable sponge brush. A word of warning though... KTM 9 does take some practice to get right. If you are just wanting to get your old color back into your guitar you might want to try acrylic laquer. Acrylic laquer doesn't yellow like Nitro.
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#10
Hmm...Acrylic lacquer, ey?

I also just read a bit about poly and nitro finishes ....It appears that most people think that poly finishes deaden tone, due to the thick polyester finished of yesteryear, in the 70's-90's. Today's guitar use poly, often, right? Supposed to be much thinner.
How hard is acrylic lacquer, in terms of application?

BTW, can a finish done with tung oil, or true oil get fairly glossy? I'm not expecting Gibson-glassy-status...But yeah.
#11
Quote by Kingyem0c0re
So is Nitro over Acrylic just like the equivilant to 2K laquer on cars over 1k.

1K paints use no catalysts, hardeners or activators to cure the paint. 2K paints (two component paints) are paints that use an added catalyst, activator, etc by linking molecules to form another substance.

Basically the difference between them is how the paint hardens. Because 1K paints have no catalysts or activators, they generally 'dry' when the paint evaporates the solvents. Nitro is the perfect example of 1K paint, it will dry once all of the solvents evaporate.

2K paints 'cure' with the help of a catalyst or activator or whatever floats your boat. These include paint such as polyurethane (not the stuff from Home Depot) & polyester. The catalyst/activator/hardener cures the paint by linking molecules together to form another substance. Basically when the catalyst gets exposed to a certain thing (be it air, or UV light) it reacts the monomers in the paint to form a polymer(s). I think Wikipedia has a good example of how the catalyst reaction works.
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#12
Stole from Wikipedia (probably stolen from somewhere else )

Catalysts generally react with one or more reactants to form an intermediate that subsequently give the final reaction product, in the process regenerating the catalyst. The following is a typical reaction scheme, where C represents the catalyst, A and B are reactants, and D is the product of the reaction of A and B:

A + C → AC (1)
B + AC → ABC (2)
ABC → CD (3)
CD → C + D (4)
Although the catalyst (C) is consumed by reaction 1, it is subsequently produced by reaction 4, so for the overall reaction:

A + B → D
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'
Last edited by AlGeeEater at Nov 16, 2007,
#14
I'm guessing the yellow only really affects the paint if you have a white guitar cos if you look at these real old guitars that people like SRV used, they're lookin' fine as long as they aren't white, plus I'd prefer a nice relic and better protection/sound!

Not that I'm an expert like Algee or Corduroy.
#16
Quote by forsaknazrael
Which kind of finish do you prefer, Algee? I've trying to figure out if I should refinish with Nitro, and risk it aging to yellow in the far future, or doing polyurethane with less coats (10 as opposed to nitro's 20+ or so...since poly is thicker, I believe...)

2K nitro is great stuff to spray, goes on thin, dries rock hard (quick) and buffs out beautifully. 2K nitro won't yellow over time unless it's constantly being baked by the sun.
'Aim at perfection in everything, though in most things it is unattainable. However, they who aim at it, and persevere, will come much nearer to it than those whose despondency and laziness make them give it up as unattainable.'