#1
when a mode , what note do u start and end on? for example would a phrase in D DORIAN start and end on D or have i misunderstood modes?
I hate to break it to you, but He is - He most definitely is.
#3
would i end on D as well? DefgabcD ? can anyone recommend me a good mode video or book?
I hate to break it to you, but He is - He most definitely is.
#4
Each mode is a scale within a major scale. For example dorian is the second degree of a scale for the basis of a scale.

C Major
C D E F G A B (C)


So if you take the second degree of that scale and play it though you get.

D Dorian
D E F G A B C (D)



But that's only one way of looking at it. You could say that a dorian scale has a flat 3rd and a flat 7th in comparison to it's major scale. D major has an F sharp and a C sharp, so if you flat those degrees you get F natural and C natural, as in the D dorian scale.

Hope this helps.
#5
If you are playing D Dorian you do NOT have to start playing on a D note or end on a D note,
First off take a chord progression for D Dorian, ie, Dm, F, G
Secondly take the scale of D dorian, 1,2,b3,4,5,6.b7 or D,E,F,G,A,B,C

Now it doesn't matter what order you play these notes in, as long as you play those particular notes over a chord progression taken from the scale it will work.

The mode is not only a group of notes played in a certain way, in order for them to work,sound and act llike a mode you must be doing this over an appropriate progession.
#6
ok i understand , but i cant seem to get my phrases to sound dorian at all
I hate to break it to you, but He is - He most definitely is.
Last edited by lesismoreSG at Nov 17, 2007,
#8
Quote by lesismoreSG
ok i understand , but i cant seem to get my phrases to sound dorian at all

The way to use modes and get their different sounds is to think of the intervals it is made up of. Phrygian has a b2, a dark, dissononant interval. Lydian has a #4, which sounds... I dunno how to describe it but it sounds cool. Mixolydian is like the major scale but has a b7, making it bluesy and dominant.

Just drone the low E string, keep it ringing (clean setting works best). Then on the remaining five stings, play E Phrygian, E lydian, E Aeloian, E Ionian etc. and emphasise the unique intervals in each. Really listen to each scales' characteristics. Try making a melody from each mode while droning the E string.

Once you have done this, watch this video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LWHKeC4IEgA
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoGQ9yHOyZQ
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#9
Well, the phrases you play don't have to begin or end on any particular note within the scale. What makes the Dorian sound is the chords. If you want a Dorian sound, you make D the tonic and focus on it. Use other chords that have the B in them too. Maybe a progression something like Dm C Am G.
#10
dude you have to understand it's the chords that bring the modes out. if you have a progression ii-v-i in C, and you play the Dmin and you start soloing in C major, your mode will come out. same for the rest. but you cannot think of it as the c major scale, but the D dorian or g mixolydian scales instead.
#11
thanks a lot guys , i think what i need is lessons on intervals and chord progressions
I hate to break it to you, but He is - He most definitely is.
#12
Quote by lesismoreSG
thanks a lot guys , i think what i need is lessons on intervals and chord progressions

RTFS
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums