#1
Okay, so I have this book that is really confusing me. It shows the patterns for loads of different scales including petatonic, blues, harmonic minor, natural minor. It has what they call forms of the scale. They are E form, D form, C form, A form and G form. They are named according to where the root notes are if they were in that open cord, so a C form of the petatonic scale has root notes in the same position as the C open cord etc, as well as the blues scale, harmonic etc.

The problem is that I never see anyone else naming them like that. Is the book trying to confuse me? It also doesn't tell you how to improvise with them and switch between them. I don't really see a point in learning them if I don't know what to do with them. It says you can move them up and down the neck, that is about it really. The book doesn't even explain what a key is, yet it says "this scale is in the key of C" etc.

Can anyone help me? I'm probably not making much sense either...
Gear:
Ibanez RG4EX1
Laney VC50
Roland Cube 30X
Boss MD-2

Ibanez GSR200

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#2
The book sounds more like a reference manual than a "how to." In other words, they're giving you the tools but not really explaining how to use them. You'll either have to do it through pure trial and error, or supplement that book with something a bit more instructional. It helps just to spend time getting your hands used to going through those patterns, and then jumping around within the patterns, moving positions around the neck, etc., which is the cornerstone of all effective, interesting improvisation.
Hi, I'm Peter
#3
Cool, thanks heaps. I know all the petatonics well and I'm alright on the blues scale (they are pretty much the same thing anyway).
Gear:
Ibanez RG4EX1
Laney VC50
Roland Cube 30X
Boss MD-2

Ibanez GSR200

Official Newbie Of The 'Australia FTW!' Club PM Alter-Bridge Or The_Random_Hero To Join. Australians only.
#4
With blues, you should look around the net for different blues standard licks, especially when it comes to turn arounds. Being a skilled improvisationalist in blues involves being knowledgable in the basic cliche phrases found in blues.
Hi, I'm Peter