#1
Hey everyone, I got one big amp that makes my ears bleed if I set the volume over one. So after some dicussion, I have decided to buy an attenuator for my amp. But I still don't understand them fully.

All I know is that they reduce the actual volume of an amp, whilst still allowing you to have the dial cranked up. This then allows you to practice without having to compromise between volume and sound quality.

But how do you use one? Do they only work on one type of amp? Do they work like a pedal (where you put it between your guitar and the amp)?

Please everyone, treat me like a noob, and give me a crack lesson on attenuators. Thanks.
#2
get a marshall power brake
I am the last Samaurai


Quote by Strati
Note to self: keep off thread while on lsd trip.

Quote by gtrfrk123
Well i'm still fairly young so i still hump random things

Quote by Woogles
****K YOU HOE!
GTFO MAH UG!
#3
This will be brief because I'm at work and helping customers. There are several different attenuators out there and though all do the same thing some do ii in ways that are better than others. I like the Weber that has the speaker motor in it the most.

Anyway, the attenuator goes between your amps output jack and your speaker, be sure to impedance match. The good thing about attenuators is yes you can crank the amps volume to get it cookin'. The bad thing is it doesn't feel the same because part of what gives a cranked tube amp it's "feel" it the speaker being overloaded and that doesn't happen unless with attenuators that are being used to kill the volume. You can tweak it so it's not totally killing the volume at the speaker but if you are getting enough volume to overdrive the speaker you may as well not be using an attenuator.
Last edited by TeleInCO at Nov 17, 2007,
#5
Quote by jakekilgore666
get a marshall power brake

No, don't- they suck a lot of tone.
Best ones are Weber, and AFAIK, they work with any amp (as long as you have the correct wattage rating).
Quote by Pookie6
Yngwi3, You win this whole monstrosity of a thread.

Quote by uk.mace
For the best tingle, use Original Source mint. That shit feels amazing on your balls.


Godfather of The Diezel Mafia
#6
Thanks bud, I will look into Weber and AFAIK.

They have 25Watt, 50Watt, 100Watt, 150Watt and 200Watt attenuators. My amp is 120Watts... Which one should I go for?
Last edited by guitarboy221 at Nov 17, 2007,
#9
get a smaller amp.
an attenuator isnt meant to make your triple recto bedroom friendly.
#10
Quote by guitarboy221
Thanks bud, I will look into Weber and AFAIK.

They have 25Watt, 50Watt, 100Watt, 150Watt and 200Watt attenuators. My amp is 120Watts... Which one should I go for?


AFAIK means As far as I know. It's not a brand.

You want an attenuator that is meant for at least the wattage of your amp. So you'll need at least the 150 watt for your amp.

+1 for the Webers. Great attenuators. I'll be picking up a Masslite soon.
Guitars:
Fender Standard Strat
Fender Deluxe Active Jazz Bass
Martin DX1

Amps:
Peavey Classic 50/212

Pedal Board:
Gator 8-Bus
Boss TU-2 Tuner
Digitech Bad Monkey
Ibanez CF7 Chorus/Flanger
ISP Decimator
Dual button footswitch
#11
Quote by TehJermie
get a smaller amp.
an attenuator isnt meant to make your triple recto bedroom friendly.


It doesn't matter if its gonna make anything "bedroom friendly", its still going to work.
Quote by R_H_C_P
^Oh my God! You're the first person to actually notice that link! A pringle to you my friend!


My Surf-o-Strat Project
#12
Anyone use or have any input on a THD attenuator? I'll be looking into an attenuator very soon for my Legacy. Moving to NY and there's no way I can get rid of my Legacy. I'll probably use the Legacy strictly for gigs, but still would like an attenuator for when I can't resist plugging in.
#14
Quote by WFMedia
Do attenuators work on solid-state amps? Just a question...


pretty much no


i'm starting to think that since his amp is 120 watts it might be solid state instead of tube. if it is shouldn't he be just getting a volume pedal or something?
#15
Quote by guitaruboy
pretty much no


i'm starting to think that since his amp is 120 watts it might be solid state instead of tube. if it is shouldn't he be just getting a volume pedal or something?

lol wtf. it does work. "Attenuate" means decrease volume in this case. and it does. but there's no point in doing that though.
Call me "Shot".

ShotRod Guitar Works

Custom Hand-wired Amplifiers and Effect Pedals.

Est. 2007


Source to everything I say about Guitars, Pedals, and Amplifiers: I make them.


UG's Best DIY PedalBoard
#16
There are a few custom made and random unheard of brands that make SS amps with an attenuator built in. It attempts to adjust the saturation point, might not be as beneficial as it with a tube amp, but still works.
#17
kinda a side note but i just moddded a light attenuator into my vj, when you flick a switch it changes over so that you ha ve alightbulb in series that attenuates a bit its pretty cool... also the light is red so it glows a cool color
#19
Quote by guitarboy221
thanks everyone

i'll go for weber (not afaik, lol, stupid me)

What amp do you have? If it's not tube (which I'll presume it is) then attenuators are pointless.

Just to let you know, and Weber seems like a good choice
OMG!!! They're playing One!!!!!11fade to black11one11

God & Founder of UG Electronics


Electronics God of the Laney Cult

My Gear:

Ibanez RG370DX
Laney VC30-212
Dunlop Crybaby
Boss CS-3
Ibanez TS9DX
#20
First, what amp are you using it with?
The Laney Thread are big and clever. No exceptions.
#22
lol, nothing to be ashamed of if ya own a SS amp, it happens, I own 2 of them!
#23
there are good solid state amps and not so good solid state amps
my guess is if you are ashamed of your amp it's a not so good solid state
#24
If it's solid state, firstly it won't do anything to the sound because they don't break up like tube amps. Secondly, it'll damage your amp.