#2
Quote by Metallica rulz

If something had 8 intervals...
If something has 7 intervals...
If something has 6 intervals...


What do you mean by if something has X intervals?
#4
Quote by Metallica rulz
A-B has 2 intervals.
C-C(octave) has 8 Intervals.
A-D has 4 intervals. And so on and so on.


I wouldn't say that's correct. A-B is a 2nd, it doesn't have two intervals, it is a 2nd interval.

To answer the threadstarter's question: No. It's a perfect octave if the second note is 8 notes away and part of the base-note's major scale.
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#5
Ah, I get you. You mean diatonic steps? That's what it looks like you're describing, in which case, apart from 8 diatonic steps always being a perfect octave, no - it won't always be a major 7th or major 6th, or any other interval.

C - E is what you desribed as '3 intervals' and is a major third, C - Eb is also three diatonic steps, but is a minor third.

Of course, if you're specifically referring to only the major scale - then you would be correct in saying 6 diatonic steps from the tonic will always a be a major 6th, and so forth.

Still not sure if I understand you properly though.
#6
Quote by Muphin
I wouldn't say that's correct. A-B is a 2nd, it doesn't have two intervals, it is a 2nd interval.

To answer the threadstarter's question: No. It's a perfect octave if the second note is 8 notes away and part of the base-note's major scale.

See I have a book here that says C is a perfect octave, with C because it is 12 half steps away.
A-B has two intervals, but B is the second Interval. Im counting the root note as an interval because thats how my book says to do it.
Edit-
Alright thanks Jones for the help
#7
Quote by Metallica rulz
See I have a book here that says C is a perfect octave, with C because it is 12 half steps away.
A-B has two intervals, but B is the second Interval. Im counting the root note as an interval because thats how my book says to do it.


12 half steps, or 8 notes, including the root. You should always count the root note in the interval, but know that a 2nd is 2 note names, a third 3 note names etc. Don't count intervals by chromatic half-steps.
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#8
Quote by Muphin
12 half steps, or 8 notes, including the root. You should always count the root note in the interval, but know that a 2nd is 2 note names, a third 3 note names etc. Don't count intervals by chromatic half-steps.

Yea sorry bout that, my book used half steps and intervals. 12 halfsteps= 8 intervals. 11 halfsteps= Major 7, or 7 intervals.

thanks for help.
#9
Quote by Metallica rulz
Yea sorry bout that, my book used half steps and intervals. 12 halfsteps= 8 intervals. 11 halfsteps= Major 7, or 7 intervals.
You are on thin ice here, friend. The correct and safe way to determine interval size (as opposed to interval quality) is to look at the notes as depicted on a staff.

Starting with "1" at the lower note, count every line and space up to and including the upper note. The ending count is the size of the interval, period, end of story. There's literally nothing else to know about determining the size of the interval.

Determining that interval's quality is another process altogether.
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#10
Quote by Metallica rulz
3 quick questions.
If something had 8 intervals is it automatically a Perfect 8?
If something has 7 intervals is it automatically a Major 7th?
If something has 6 intervals is it automatically a Major 6th?


Simply put, no. It depends on the interval. A perfect 8th (or octave) has an interval of 8 notes in a major or minor scale. And in a major scale, 7 notes would make a major 7th. But you need more information. In a minor or modal scale, your statements could be incorrect. It all depends on what scale you're in and the differences between the gaps in tones and semitones.