#1
What's the best way to go about learning how to play with speed. I know everyone's gonna say, Use A Metronome. And I am, but i'm looking for somethin more detailed.
Like, how long do I stay on each bpm?
And, how many notes per beat?
What should I be practicing?
Is there a correct way to practice?
Also, what would be a good practice schedule? I don't have a job so I have plenty of time to practice. 5-7 hours a day. Any help would be apprecitated, thanks.
I also want to learn the theory behind it so that i'm not just sitting there playing scales up and down without any improv. I want to be able to move between scales during solos. You know like, start in Dorian and then go into the minor pentatonic, fluentley. What's the best way to go about learning all this?
#2
The way I increased my speed was doing chromatic exercises with all alternate picking using a metronome. I just set the metronome to the speed that I could do the the fastest knowing there was no chance I would make a mistake then increased BPM slowly. I practiced that about 30 minutes to 1 hour a day for a month and got a lot faster.
#4
Quote by drag_the_waters
What's the best way to go about learning how to play with speed. I know everyone's gonna say, Use A Metronome. And I am, but i'm looking for somethin more detailed.
Like, how long do I stay on each bpm?
And, how many notes per beat?
What should I be practicing?
Is there a correct way to practice?
Also, what would be a good practice schedule? I don't have a job so I have plenty of time to practice. 5-7 hours a day. Any help would be apprecitated, thanks.
I also want to learn the theory behind it so that i'm not just sitting there playing scales up and down without any improv. I want to be able to move between scales during solos. You know like, start in Dorian and then go into the minor pentatonic, fluentley. What's the best way to go about learning all this?


So your just looking how to get better in general? Alternate picking is a great start. I have some video's I made. Dont know how good they are, but the things I show in them helped me get better dramatically.

http://www.youtube.com/feltgrape
Quote by BigFatSandwich
it took you 15 consecutive hours of practice to realize that playing guitar makes you better at playing guitar. congratulations.


Quote by snowbert
SMOKE UN-DER WATER!!!


#5
Quote by SOAD_freak777
The way I increased my speed was doing chromatic exercises with all alternate picking using a metronome. I just set the metronome to the speed that I could do the the fastest knowing there was no chance I would make a mistake then increased BPM slowly. I practiced that about 30 minutes to 1 hour a day for a month and got a lot faster.



Do the chromatic scale exercises or face locking up and lack of mobility... This was a serious obstacle for me to overcome when I was learning to shred 3 years ago. Also when you get the change learn every position of every mode of the major scale and be able to play them up and down the neck.

As far as scales are concerned realize that you can learn each and every scale in ever position in every mode. You should do this if you can. The reason why people tell you to be able to play the major scale in every position for every mode up and down the neck is because it is the most common but if you need to expand more power to you.
Last edited by silentdud at Nov 22, 2007,
#6
Since you have a lot of time to practice, I would say pick and easy scale like A major for example and use the metronome set at about 70 BPM. Start off playing the scale as quarter notes. Once you can do it without and difficulty, the move up to eighth notes, then triplets, then sixteenth notes, then sixteenth note triplets, and finally thirty-second notes (you can go higher if you want but just something simple like a major scale is ridiculous at 70 BPM as sixty-fourth notes). Once you get used to that, you could increase the speed.

For being able to switch between scales, you should just get used to how each scale sounds and how scales go together. There are many similarities in scales so instead of looking for what's the same, just find and memorize the differences. For example, if you switch from major to minor, major is whole step, whole step, half step, whole, whole, whole, half. Minor is whole, whole, half, whole, whole, half, whole. All you really have to know is the difference at the end and then just play each over and over so you can get used to how they sound and feel.
#7
start slow then gradually speed up. just now i'm seeing the fruits of my labor doing chromatics for the past 3 weeks.
#8
The secret of Satriani, Vai, and Malmsteen? Free-basing kidney stones. That's how you get to the next level.

Seriously though, practice slow, and, equally important, practice repetitions. I think lots of people make the mistake that if they practice a scale slowly it's just fine, practicing a scale over and over is just as important.

I personally break scales up into two and three string runs to work on getting that fluid sound. I spend probably a solid hour working scales.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#9
What really makes guitaring sound good is putting in some pinched harmonics.
#10
Quote by T-Kid
What really makes guitaring sound good is putting in some pinched harmonics.


Good point. Look at where putting in pinch harmonics got Zakk Wylde.
Livin' Easy, Livin' Free
#12
scales...scales...scales...oh and more scales!

learn all the scales, play them up and down, then mix them up, then just play scale notes.

do a lot of chromatics

up and down, backwards and forwards, mix them up, do different patterns to increase your speed and agility.

practice legato, and rolls.