#1
So I'm looking at chords and all of them have all these "b" and "bm" and "bmaj7" and "7" after the basic chord. What do these mean and is there any standard meaning that'll help me understand them better?
#3
saying this might not make sense but:

they're different variations of chords on the bass note (in this case it's 'b')
b by itself would make a major chord...it usually sounds bright and happy
bm would make a minor chord...they're darker and more moody
the '7' is just another variation on top of the major or minor...it makes the chord sound more bluesy or jazzy
#4
Quote by johnny butt
saying this might not make sense but:

they're different variations of chords on the bass note (in this case it's 'b')
b by itself would make a major chord...it usually sounds bright and happy
bm would make a minor chord...they're darker and more moody
the '7' is just another variation on top of the major or minor...it makes the chord sound more bluesy or jazzy

I think he means "b" and "bm" as in flat and flat minor.

So if you have a Ab it is an A flat chord
Ab7 is a chord where the 7th note of the A scale is included

etc...
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#5
nope, an Ab7 is an Ab chord with the 7th note of the Ab major scale.
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#6
Quote by a17
I think he means "b" and "bm" as in flat and flat minor.

So if you have a Ab it is an A flat chord
Ab7 is a chord where the 7th note of the A scale is included

etc...

whoops!
#7
b means the chord is dropped a half step - i.e. Ab is one half step or one fret lower than A. You'll also find notes with #, which means the chord is raised a half step. This only applies if the b/# is right after the note name though (C, D, E, F, G, A or B). If it's anywhere else in the chord name, it's referring to one of the notes in the chord that's dropped or raised by a half step, but you won't really encounter that much.

Maj7 means the chord includes a major 7th note - which is the note one fret down from the root note, only usually one or two octaves up. If the chord is a "7", it means it has a minor 7th, which is two frets below the root note, but again, usually one or two octaves up.
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#9
They help you make music because you accompany those types of chords to your type of music.

If you were composing a jazz song you would use a lot of 7 and maj7 chords acompanied with a lead guitar consisting of notes from modes based off of jazz its one of em I can't remember the name
#10
Quote by steven seagull
nope, an Ab7 is an Ab chord with the 7th note of the Ab major scale.



Actually, it'd be the flatted 7th of the Ab major scale since it's a dominant seventh chord, it would use the 7th degree unflattened if it were an Ab maj7 chord