#1
...with only your 2 god given hands, and nuthin else.

Here are a few things I've come up with. Over the past week I've been trying to make the notes sound like they're "crying", or emulating other emotions so that each note has character (in the literal sense). Here're some techniques I've developed.


-quarter note pre-bends that "unbend" immediately gives a whining/sighing feel

-alternating vibrato depth and speed can give character

-a hammer-on that goes right into a slide works well

-without a pick, pulling the string up real high and letting go makes it slam into the fretboard. Controling this technique is tough, but sounds good

-doing a slide and playing a note on the next highest string that's up a 3rd-5th, soon followed by a bend, that note order just sounds good to me


What've you got to help your tone?
#2
does this include a whammy bar?
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#3
if you are looking for a crying tone there is always claptons which is rythym pickup with the tone all the way done. I know that is more in a setting sort of sense but I believe just rolling down the tone on any pickup can really give you a sad solemn sort of sound
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#4
Satriani's bends and vibratos are great. I can never get my guitar to keep them going for so long though.
#5
What about legato versus eco. versus alternate versus hybrid?
#6
Quote by J.A.M
What about legato versus eco. versus alternate versus hybrid?

why versus? they go along well enough, and combining them multiplies your possibilities by a lot of times
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#7
Yes, they do. But what I meant to say was that you could use any of these techniques to achieve a different tone.
#8
would you mind putting up some sound clips of the examples given? i would like to hear what they sound like.
#9
I've never understood the picking styles, could someone explain them? I just did what felt most natural, and that gets me along fast enough. Do the different styles give different tones?

Also, I'm looking more at ways to make the string sound different. Like open and fretted notes, slamming the string so it smacks the fretboard, harmonics, legato and picking and finger picking, slides and bends, palm muting, strumming the strings while muting them (for that "chuck" sound), different gauge strings, different picks, slide guitar, vibrato, vibrato behind the nut, vibrato arm, sliding your finger on the string w/o fretting it... those are just the basics. I'm curious of fun ways of incorporating those techiniques like the pre-bends I love so very much, or hammering into a slide.

Any ideas?
#10
I'm a big fan of harmonics + whammy bar. One of the easiest tricks is to depress the bar a little, sound the harmonic, then release the bar slowly. Of course, there are lots of possibilities.

I think a lot of players are overusing the whammy bar, not in that they're using it too much, but it seems like they think they are obliged to always do really radical moves just because a locking trem enables them to do so. A little goes a long way, in my opinion. With some subtle whammy use you can get some nice moaning, atmospheric sounds.
#11
without a pick, pulling the string up real high and letting go makes it slam into the fretboard. Controling this technique is tough, but sounds good


That's called popping a string. It's basically a bass technique,
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#12
That's called popping a string. It's basically a bass technique,


only if you use a finger, with the thumb it's called slapping. I tend to think slapping is a little richer. Either way, though, they never sound as good on a guitar as on bass. There is also another finger strumming technique from flamenco called rasgueado.

And if you're going to experiment with picking techniques, the one that will get the most "unique" sound will by hybrid picking. Hard as hell, though compared to anything else.
Last edited by capiCrimm at Nov 19, 2007,
#13
I messed around with fingerstyle electric blues. It's tough to do, but "slap" techniques, multiple-string phrasing (and string skipping) all become accessible.

Also, tapping high up while phrasing down low is readily achievable.

The overall difficulty of the technique is limiting in itself, but if you're looking for something different it's worth trying. It might make a good alternative to the "same old" blue solo.
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#14
Listen to Albert King for an excellent example of a crying guitar, and also snapping the strings
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#15
To get the guitar to 'cry', i normally just do a volume swell (with the volume knob on the guitar) . Roll off the volume with your picking hand, hammer-on to a note with your fretting hand, then as you swell the volume, bend the note up.
#16
Quote by damiensiew
To get the guitar to 'cry', i normally just do a volume swell (with the volume knob on the guitar) . Roll off the volume with your picking hand, hammer-on to a note with your fretting hand, then as you swell the volume, bend the note up.


yea ive been trying to do this more too and be able to pick and swell at the same time. you cant really alternate the picking but you can do downstrokes. its kind of tough at first but im getting better at it.
#17
I use a volume pedal for that, it really makes a difference. Start by picking the note with the volume pedal completely off, then step on it to gradually bring the volume up. The trick is to eliminate the pick attack. A lot of the time I slowly bend the note up in pitch also, then right at the end of it drop it back and cut the volume. Works great, and harmonics can be used too, but unless you press the string behind the nut or use a whammy bar you can't change the pitch. I use both. I also use an analog delay pedal for a light one slapback echo, that helps especially with making a crying sound.

I normally use the neck pickup, neck or middle on a strat. Bridge pickup will do it, but with a much brighter tone, the bassier sound of neck and middle pickups works much better.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Nov 22, 2007,
#18
Scraping the edge of the pick along a string for a split second before actually picking a note can give this great sense of 'holding back' that particular note, like a sense of hesitancy. Listen to Snow Bound by Arch Enemy
#19
These are excellent, but you all forget the basic experimentation with tone!

Satriani talked about in one of his lessons about his experimentation with tone, which is really key. Where you pick in relation to the pickups matters a hell of a lot, which is why it is important to not anchor! Learn to play close to your fretting fingers then go back to right next to the pickup or by the bridge. Then try all the inbetween stuff!
#20
^ Good point, I didn't think of it either. I have always done that, since I noticed many years ago the sound of an acoustic changes depending on where I pick in relation to the sound hole, so I tried it on electric and sure enough, it makes a big difference. I pick everywhere from the end of the fretboard, on top of the last few frets to an inch from the bridge, depending on the sound and tone I'm after. Same for fingerpicking. For a lot of rhythm parts I like to strum at the end of the fretboard or on top of it for the mellow, fuller sound I can get. If I'm after a ZZ Top style high gain distortion with plenty bite, I pick close to the bridge.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#21
Quote by CanasClone
These are excellent, but you all forget the basic experimentation with tone!

Satriani talked about in one of his lessons about his experimentation with tone, which is really key. Where you pick in relation to the pickups matters a hell of a lot, which is why it is important to not anchor! Learn to play close to your fretting fingers then go back to right next to the pickup or by the bridge. Then try all the inbetween stuff!


yea i do that a lot too. when i play faster stuff though i usually pick around the middle pickup. the tension is tigher so its a little easier to pick faster. but im usually moving around with the pick to change the tone.