#1
1. What should I practice and learn to be able to improvise or at least write good solos? I've practiced and learned the important scales. I haven't tried to yet, don't really need to either, but after listening to the B.B. King Anthology it inspired me. I mean, I don't know if there's a technical term for it, but where you play a lick, and play a similar one after but end it differently so it sounds...complementary to the other one (not sure how to put it).

2. Modes; phrygian; okay so I know phrygian has a b2, b3, b6, and b7. What about phrygian dominant? Isn't it the same but with a natural 3? So why is it dominant? I tried figuring it out but to no avail. I like the sound of it, I was messing around with it in F#, found out the step pattern from reading the intro by Wolf Marshall to the tab book for Metallica's AJFA.
Originally Posted by SkyValley
yeah im a virgin but im also pretty good at things like ping-pong and drawing pictures of people playing water polo so it balances out
#2
for the 2nd question, a dominant chord, IE, in the key of C, G7, which would be the functioning V7 chord of C major, is voiced based on the mixolydian mode, and is built like this: 1 3 5 b7

so if we look at the formula for a normal phrygian chord, its 1 b3 5 b7
raise the third, to make it a dominant chord
1 3 5 b7

and you have phrygian dominant

thats why you call it that, however thats not why the way it is, its the 5th mode of harmonic minor
Quote by beadhangingOne
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#3
AHA! I see. Thanks alot. I'll have to take note of that.

Wait, does the V chord have to have the b7 to be considered dominant, because wouldn't it be considered dominant anyway since it's the V, dominant, of the scale?
Originally Posted by SkyValley
yeah im a virgin but im also pretty good at things like ping-pong and drawing pictures of people playing water polo so it balances out
Last edited by Baasoromyuu at Nov 18, 2007,
#4
well a dominant chord is defined by the qualities of 1 3 5 and b7, if it were a cadence such as:
V-I
compared to
V7-Ima7

i would just call the first one a V chord, not a dominant chord, because theres no 7th played

and to be able to improv?
well ive been diggin into it a lot lately, and i'd say the best way to get better at it is to just do it, the more i do it the more i start using several techniques and getting more a flow to my improv, and the more i improv the more i see ways that i can learn something, ie, ive been using diads or triads with improv and thats just something i noticed as i improved, well why arent i using more notes that one at a time, so i just worked through the modes i primarily use until it was burned in my brain what each chord quality was, granted ive only done that with like 3 modes, but now i use diads and triads without thinking, and can make them fit into the improv

get a pedal of some sort that can loop stuff, i have digital delay and i just loop simple progressions, whether it be with root changes, or II-V-I progressions, i can hear how things function so much easier
Quote by beadhangingOne
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#5
^Just remember that the word dominant by itself can describe a lot of different things. It's true that a chord with the degrees 1 3 5 b7 without any harmonic context could accurately be called a dominant chord, but I think it's more accurate to call it a dominant 7th chord.

The reason I'm telling you this is because in your example, both the V and the V7 chords moving to I are dominant in function, though one is a major triad and the other is a dominant 7th chord. In you example, the V and the V7 chords are both leading you back to tonic which is a dominant function.

The point is, a V chord within a key will be your dominant chord even if it's not a dominant 7th chord, but a V triad taken out of context would not be considered dominant.
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Last edited by rageandlove04 at Nov 19, 2007,
#6
Quote by Baasoromyuu
I mean, I don't know if there's a technical term for it, but where you play a lick, and play a similar one after but end it differently so it sounds...complementary to the other one (not sure how to put it).


It's called melody writing, and this is a common technique and has been used since the baroque era, and probably earlier. The musician creates a melody that ends in an imperfect cadence, often I V, and then repeats the melody ending in a perfect cadence (V I) and sometimes changing the notes before the cadence to make it sound more 'complete.'
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#7
Ahh, so that's it, I've read about the few different cadences, but I haven't taken the time to apply them to anything. Thanks everyone.
Originally Posted by SkyValley
yeah im a virgin but im also pretty good at things like ping-pong and drawing pictures of people playing water polo so it balances out
#8
For some really good ideas for soloing watch Marty Friedman's 'Melodic Control' on Google Videos. He describes what is going on in his head while soloing. Basically its about following the chords and target notes.
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#9
Quote by Muphin
It's called melody writing, and this is a common technique and has been used since the baroque era, and probably earlier. The musician creates a melody that ends in an imperfect cadence, often I V, and then repeats the melody ending in a perfect cadence (V I) and sometimes changing the notes before the cadence to make it sound more 'complete.'


Does that go along with periodicity (antecedent phrase + consequent phrase = period)? I'm not sure if it's the same thing or something different altogether.
...to give your love no matter what is what she said...
#11
Quote by rageandlove04
Does that go along with periodicity (antecedent phrase + consequent phrase = period)? I'm not sure if it's the same thing or something different altogether.


Some have called it 'question and answer.'
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